Matt Harwood

Wheel cylinders for 1940 Plymouth P10 Special Deluxe Convertible

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I've spent the last two hours searching for wheel cylinders for this pretty little 1940 Plymouth convertible and I'm not having much luck. I did find Ply33's useful website information, but it seems that most of the cross-referenced part numbers are now obsolete. There are some on Ebay or Kanter but I don't think those are really the right ones--it seems to me that this car uses one type for the front and unique cylinders for reach rear wheel. I'm not positive, but that seems to be what I'm reading. 


Anyway, I can't seem to find any that are under $90 or so. I really only need the rears, but I'd buy all four if they were priced like regular wheel cylinders. The car has a bit of a mushy pedal that we can't cure and my mechanic thinks it's the rear wheel cylinders that seem to be weeping just a little.

 

Can anyone point me in the right direction or give me a cross-reference for a modern replacement? Heck, even just knowing the diameter would be extremely helpful. Any recommendations?

 

Thank you!

 

 

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Why not have them re-sleeved, I had my Desoto;s stepped rear cylinders sleeved with stainless steel and now will not have to touch them again.

You have the brake cylinder, saves grief of trying to find replacement.

Peter

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14 minutes ago, wangwilko said:

Why not have them re-sleeved, I had my Desoto;s stepped rear cylinders sleeved with stainless steel and now will not have to touch them again.

You have the brake cylinder, saves grief of trying to find replacement.

Peter

You can use Whitepost Restorations or Apple Hydraulics for the sleeving.

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I struck out finding reasonably-priced replacement cylinders and I might take you up on yours, Broker-len, but we're going to try rebuilding these first. We took them apart to get some measurements and they're quite clean inside so just a quick hone should clean them up enough to use. Rebuild kits are only $7 or so from NAPA so we're going to start there. I used the parts numbers from Ply33's website so hopefully those are accurate and we'll have good parts. This has been the most confusing parts hunt I've ever done simply because Plymouth seemed to use two different rear cylinders, which are, of course, different from the fronts, plus they changed halfway through production. So I hope I have the right parts. We'll find out.


Thanks for the feedback, hopefully this works. If not, we'll move on to Plan B. 

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I have obtained the rubber parts for my 1930 Dodge 8 by walking into a parts shop and asking for cups and boots by size. No part numbers required. If you hone the cylinders you may need oversize cups to seal properly.

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Looks like we're a go with rebuilding the cylinders. We had to get them from two different places, but the cylinders themselves were not pitted so we honed them and reassembled them with the new parts. The car has a nice firm pedal now and the braking is effective. Thanks for all the help, everyone!

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I have the 1940 - 1942 Plymouth Wheel Cylinders ----- BRAND NEW -----

and as I indicated to you on the Oldsmobile Forum --- I have some phenomenal items for your 1966 Mustang (OEM FOMOCO!!!!!!!!! too)

the 1953 Olds ++ NEW ++ CARTER ++ Carburetos -- I practically "threw it away" is gone........

you NEVER called --- it could have been yours..........

 

The magic phone number remains ------ 516 - 485 - 1935...... Craig ....... West Hempstead, Long Island, New York...........

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Then and Now Automotive / Antique Auto  Cellar 

447 Washington Street 

Weymouth,  Mass . 01288

 

Tom Hannaford 

M-F  8-5

Ph: 781-335-8860

 

Also an AAmco 1750 brake gage

 to help set shoe anchor pins correctly 

for best adjustment / performance....

 

Edited by 42319DB34
Add'l contact info added ... (see edit history)

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