Gdeleonpj

1972 Dodge Dart Wiring

Recommended Posts

1972 dodge dart swinger

 

 

[Background: im not much of a gear head but I'm slowly learning more and more each day I study and work on cars but I'm trying to figure out the best route for my project car my father passed to me.

  Been working a lot and haven't been able to touch it but the only thing keeping it from running is the wiring harness inside and out. (It shorted and my father took it out without much though after) I've tried to locate a diagram and rewire it with another harness I pulled from a picking pool.]

  Essentially the question I'm trying to get an answer from someone more experienced than I; should I continue to mess with the harness I have and Jerry ring it or is there like an aftermarket kit that would work?  If so can you provide details.

(Obviously I should find oem harness but I haven't came across one yet)

(Also I know I should probably leave this to someone who already knows electrical work but that defeats the purpose of me learning)

20180315_105753.jpg

Snapchat-31835058.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if it ran with that rat nest save yourself a ton of money chasing your tail.IF it ran before and everything works you would do well to just neaten it up with some tape  time consuming but less time than tearing it out

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out Rhode Island wiring. They might have the Harness. The will send a diagram with it and if you have any questions they will help. If not there are mopar suppliers that have them. What you have is a fire waiting to happen. Be safe .  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

Cut it all out throw it away or scrap it for the copper value, Buy a new wiring kit with instructions, the fire you save will be yours. Bob 

And make sure you have a good fire extinguisher or 2 in the car.

I doubt if any of that wiring mess is original.

Was the car a V8 when made, or a was did have a 225ci slant 6?

 

(When I travelled in USA-Canada in 1980-81 I bought a brown 1972 Dodge Dart)

Edited by 1939_Buick (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, 1939_Buick said:

And make sure you have a good fire extinguisher or 2 in the car.

I doubt if any of that wiring mess is original.

Was the car a V8 when made, or a was did have a 225ci slant 6?

 

(When I travelled in USA-Canada in 1980-81 I bought a brown 1972 Dodge Dart)

Nah it's not original. The mess you see is a harness I took from a scrap car. The v8 340 engine came from a  fury sport i believe

(The harness is half assed because like I said; novice at all this..but it won't work without rigging) I'm probably going to try and go through rhode island

 

Edited by Gdeleonpj (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gdeleonpj,

                       First let me say welcome aboard!

Small block '72 Dart......nice!  That's a pretty cool car to be passed to you. None of the systems are too difficult on that platform, so this should be a fairly easy car for you to "makes your bones" with, even if you're a beginner.

I have done extensive automotive wiring. I like it and find it's usually a lot simpler than it first looks (like arithmetic, it's either right or wrong and you know immediately). As you can see by the posts you've already received here, there are two camps of thought; toss the old harness and start new or repair the one you have. From the picture you posted all I see is an unwrapped harness which can look a little intimidating at first. If all those wires were wrapped it wouldn't function any better than it does right now but it wouldn't look so bad either.

If this were my car, I'm certain I'd have it running in no time. Here is where I'd start; go to eBay and purchase this year/model specific wiring diagram (I've added the link below). It's only $17.95.  The picture is generic, but it gives you the basic idea. I buy this exact one for EVERY vintage car I get and it is the BEST investment I can make for under $20. It is large, 11" X 17", laminated so you can have it under the hood without ruining it and it is super easy to read as all the wires are the exact same colors as the harness in your car. There are only a few circuits under your hood. Pick any one to start with and just follow each wire from one end to the other, component to component. It's easier than you think.

I have also bought complete harnesses when need be, usually on my real vintage stuff that has old cloth covered wire. But for a car from the 70's it will be A LOT MORE WORK to replace the entire harness and certainly a lot more money. The replacement harness for my '38 coupe was almost $1,000 from Rhode Island. Very nice, expensive, but I had no choice.

You can find tons of free advice here from some real knowledgeable guys and it's free. Make sure you scroll down a little ways and put a post on the Dodge forum here as well. It will tend to stay a little longer as this General Discussion forum moves reasonably quick and your post may get lost after a couple of days.

Good luck with the great new project and keep us up to date!

Best, Greg

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1972-72-Dodge-Dart-Plymouth-Duster-Full-Color-Laminated-Wiring-Diagram-11-X-17/362345434543?epid=21006212384&hash=item545d788daf:g:HGMAAOSwNphWXarb

 

wire.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd add two thoughts:

1) Rewire it as it was originally for the V8 without the MSD ignition system or any other add on equipment.  Then add back by wiring to an already completed system, the MSD and other stuff.  The reason for this is that the original wiring diagram won't include any alterations.  Get it right to that point then get a hold of the MSD wiring instructions which work from an original harness layout, which you will then have.  Other added equipment such as an electric fuel pump or electric choke, if present are also installed based on a original layout.

 

2) Find another car similar to yours at a car show and photograph the underhood wiring layout.  You can then see all the twists, turns and places for connections to the inner fenders and firewall, etc.

 

I'd start with a rewire, it will look better and be easier to diagnose any future problems.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't decide if the original post is a joke or if it's a serious question. I see a few wires that look like they are just placed on the engine with both ends not connected to anything. If you are serious then yes, I would completely rewire your engine compartment before a fire does it for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the AACA Discussion Forum. I have edited your title to be more specific about what you need help with. I have also moved it to the Dodge Forum where you will hopefully find some people with more Dodge specific experience.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it were me I would cruise the local 'you pull it' in hopes to find an original harness.

Its all plug and play. 

Problem is most have been played with.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would get wiring diagrams for 72 and 73. Mopar wiring harnesses of that period plug together at the firewall with the dreaded "bulkhead connector". In addition for the wiring diagrams, get the pinouts for the bulkhead connector for 72 and 73.

 

A 1973 engine harness may make more sense if all the circuits are the same at the bulkhead connector. Wiring was basically the same with minor changes for many years. Electronic voltage regulators (and an extra wire to the alternator) came in 70, and electronic ignition came in 73.

 

Now, about your alternator, How many amps is it? The double pulley implies 45 amp, but you sure cant depend on that. The three common types are 35 amp, 45 amp, and 60 amp. Mopars of the period that had 35 or 45 amp originally (basically all of them) ran the charging circuit through the bulkhead connector. Cars with a factory 60 amp alternator (police cars mostly) had a separate harness for the charging circuit going through the firewall with no connectors.

 

Trouble often arises because there are a lot of 60 amp alternators floating around these days.The bulkhead connector is barely adequate for a 45 amp alternator (it is fine for the first 30 years or so). The 60 amp alternator will melt it. If that is what you have, and you are going to keep it, you may need to run the charging circuit through the firewall separately. If you do that, there is a wire over at the bulkhead that will have to be connected. If you wind up at that spot, post back and maybe we can help.

 

Another reason I brought up the bulkhead connector is that it is likely if you buy a used harness, the charging circuit terminals may need to be replaced, so expect that.

 

Speaking of alternators, it looks like yours is missing a support bracket from that top bolt over to the water pump.

 

In the picture, I see the electronic regulator and electronic ignition. The 72 had the electronic regulator, but no electronic ignition. I brought up the possibility of a 73 engine harness because that would have the electronic ignition included. If the pinout at the firewall is the same, that would get electronic ignition in the main harness. If not, it is not too much trouble to add it. Chrysler had a conversion harness with their electronic ignition kits. It isn't much wire. If this is a street drivable car that idles relatively smooth, I would get rid of the extra ignition box (MSD?) and just use the Chrysler electronic. Use that module you have, or better yet get a Chrysler "Orange Box".

 

You may be able to get wiring diagrams at your local library. Ask for a Mitchell wiring diagram manual covering 72 and 73. They probably wont let you check it out, you will have to photocopy it there.

 

Welcome to the forum!

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've found that when doing wiring, having a wiring diagram is invaluable and secondly, using new wiring is just smart. Tracking electrical gremlins can be very frustrating, so why not maximize your chances for success with fresh wiring? Using a used harness or cobbling one together from pieces can lead to all kinds of mischief. Give yourself the best chance to succeed by using a new wiring harness that's either designed for the car or at least one of those aftermarket systems with 10- or 15 circuits, a new fuse box, and coded wires. Don't try to cut and splice what you have or a junkyard piece. The money you spend up front will be more than rewarded by fewer hours of troubleshooting and headaches later. How much is your time worth?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now