David Fertig

1950 Chevy distributor

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I just started working on a '50 Chevy and found that at some point, someone put a '55-62 distributor on it.  

 

Would there have been a reason for this?

 

And of course I already bought a cap for a '50.  Sigh.... 

 

So, should I just get a cap for a '55-62, or should I buy a '50 distributor?  I assume the points and condenser would be the same.

 

Thanks!

KIMG2674.JPG

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These are the numbers for the 1950 and 1955 235 engines:

 

1950 >>> CARDONE 301608 {#1110090, 1110092, 1112353, 1112358, 1112362, 1112363

1955 >>> CARDONE 301609 {#1112388, 1112389, 1112392, 1112396, 1112400, 1112403, 1112407, 1112411, 1112414

 

Nobody will know and they got updated for a reason.

I'd stick with the later one.

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I would check to see if it is a '50 engine. Swaps to the larger 235 were common back in the day. And the distributor might have come along with the newer engine.😉

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Well, here is some more info:

 

Block stamping is HAM504121 which looks to be a 1950 Towanda, NY. regular engine.

 

Head is cast 3835913 GM22 which looks to be 1954-55?

 

Distributor is Delco model 1112403 which looks to be 1955-62.

 

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Most likely someone swapped in a used distributor to replace a worn or damaged original, back when it was just another used car. If you are a fanatic you could track down an original 1950 distributor, NOS point, etc. If you just want a good running car take the cap back, exchange it for the one that fits the distributor, and in future just buy the points etc that fit. Functionally I don't think there is any difference although if there is the Chev fans will no doubt chime in.

 

This reminds me of a friend of mine who bought a 1962 Pontiac 4 door hardtop for $50 bucks broken down by the side of the road. It was a Canadian Pontiac with the 261 six. He went home, grabbed a distributor out of a defunct 1954 Chev he had, put it in the Pontiac and drove it home. He kept the car as every day transportation for a couple of years. This was about 1971. When he sold the Pontiac it still had the Chev distributor in it.

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Only slightly off topic.  This is the easy way to identify a 261 engine.  These bars are not on the smaller Chevrolet engine.

engine 261 id.jpg

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You should get yourself a note book that will stay in the car.  Every time you find a number like on the distributor put it in the book.  If you remove a bearing or a seal write the number down for reference.  Any time you are working on the car record any and all serial numbers and casting numbers.  Please refer to each type of number correctly.  It is real hard to help someone who gives you a casting number rather than stamped number.  When you have no specific history of the car you have no idea of what has been replaced with what.  Any time yu order something use the reference number from the part you are working on, not the year or make/model of the car.

Good luck and happy hobbying with your car.

Edited by Tinindian (see edit history)
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Thanks for all the info.  Yes, good advice on the notebook.  I bought this car from a friend who bought it from a guy who said he had it running and driving recently and that he (I believe this is what he said) was the original owner.

 

However...

 

The plugs were so crusty and the points were shot - it wouldn't even fire with a squirt in the carb.  And the fuel pump does not.

 

So...  A few more parts then originally thought.  But at least there is a new poly tank in the car.

 

Little floor pan work and it'll be a cool car to spin around town.

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cahartley - some cars more then others.  I had a '31 Chevy 5-window that I would turn the key and go.  It didn't like sitting in traffic, but I'd drive that one anywhere.  And we just finished a '48 Fleetline that I hope to drive a bunch.  But I also have a '33 Chevy that I am not sure what is going to fall off, seize up, pop out, or stop working next.

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