Hubert_25-25

spark and throttle lever "friction shoes"

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The 1925 Buick parts book calls these "friction shoes".  These friction shoes that add a little friction to the spark and throttle levers.  Are these supposed to be installed dry or greased?  

 

Thank you,

Hugh

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IMHO   If they are called friction shoes I would think they should be installed dry.  We don't oil our brake shoes.

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I do not have an answer for you except to say you should experiment.  If dry, do they levers move freely without noise and keep the levers in place, then fine, dry.  if not and the levers are herky jerky then some lubrication, maybe anti-seize compound.  Good luck and let us know what you find out.  Gary

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The shoes are aluminum and the stationary hub is aluminum.  The surface of the shoe appears to have a little gauling, which is part of the reason for asking the question.  Gary is asking my question, as I would want it to be a smooth action, but from the looks of my friction shoes, some light sanding of the friction shoes may be in order.  I was not sure if I put grease on these if that would go to far the other way and they would not hold well.  There is a lot involved in rebuilding all the throttle and spark parts. and I don't have the engine in the car to test the operation either.    Hugh     

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On my '18 they appear to be a sort of Bakelite. If they get sticky, I rub a touch of Vaseline on the aluminum surface the run on.

I'd be surprised at aluminum because aluminum on aluminum is a bad wear combination - but I dont really know about the newer cars.

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I will need to look at these shoes in more detail.  I may have aluminum that is rubbed off from the stationary hub surface onto the friction surface so I thought they were aluminum.  I will report back after I have had a chance to look at my parts.  

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Ours were like Larry's. Some sort of layered fiber material.

Exposure to the elements had them mostly falling apart.

Had my favourite retired machinist turn a full circle of material out of plastic ( Delrin?) with inner step on the ID  and then I just cut out sections as needed. One circle will do about 2 cars. You'll see what I mean if you look at it!

With the plastic , I don't think you need any lubrication.

 

Brad

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Thanks to all for your advise.  I was able to clean these friction shoes up today.  They are some sort of fiberous material.  Today we would use a hard plastic.    They are solid material and not the same as aluminum to minimize gauling.  Mine still look good, and I plan to just clean things up and install them dry.   In typical Buick fashion, these dimensions are 1 year only (1925) and fit a Standard only.   1722933739_steeringsparkandthrottlefrictionshoesnippet.JPG.3dc7c0f2227199503d1c9d10d5fd4deb.JPGHugh

 

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