PreWarQc

Pre war cars insane prices

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Hi everybody. I've always wanted a pre war automobile but was always pushed back by the high prices. I never questionned those prices before because the market usually decides what the prices should be. However, I noticed in the past 3-5 years, that there is obviously a lot less people who are willing to buy those cars and they stay for a much longer time on the market and a lot of them are never sold. What disappoints me is the fact that instead of lowering their prices, most owners prefer to keep their car and let it deteriorate... I know it's none of my buisness what you decide to do with your own property however, antique cars are more than just property in the cultural sense and this kind of behavior is killing the futur existence of pre war cars for humanity to enjoy. I've seen a lot of pre war cars that are semi abandonned and waste away, they stop being maintained, driven and exposed to young people who would potentially be interested in learning about them, and maybe buying one. ''Young'' guys like me who would like to enjoy those cars are rare but there are a few of us and we are willing to buy them, but only at a realistic price. I have a bit of money but I am also aware that paying 20k for something that will be worth 5k (maybe less) in the next 10 year makes no sense. I know for a fact that the current generation (X's, Millenials...) will produce few humans that have the interest or hability to work with these machines. I am sadden to see a lot of cars rust away or good car being neglected. I've been looking at the Pre war car market for at least 10 years now and I tought price would have come down slowly, I never expected this!

8000$ for a REO with no wheels, no top, extremly rusted and has not started since the 50's. 1929 Essex more rust than metal for 5000$. Ford model T for 20 000$... 5000$ for a model A that is in storage since the 40's. Guys who hoard (as in the illness) pre war cars only to let them sit in an old barn rothing away with no exposure to young people... and those kind of guys complaining about young people not being interested in past.

Why deprive the people who should take the torch of being the keepers of those cars just because you don't get a fixed price you have in your head or because you need to hoard those cars until death comes and by then the only buyer is going to be the local recycling facility. Appart from Deusenbergs, Pierce Arrows etc... the market is bound to crash when most of the older generation will need to sell for all sorts of reason but by then, very few guys will be willing to buy and most of people like me who would of bought those cars will have moved on to others passions. I needed to vent! Please don't take offence. Thank you.

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If you really want a prewar car they are out there. I have a decent 1942 Chevrolet sedan I can let you have reasonable. You need to watch your chances to find one you can afford, that is not too far gone.

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What kind of prewar vehicles are you looking for ???  Where are you searching for cars ?

 

First - the "dreamers" with the $5 to 10K pile of rust have always been there. If you are looking in the "sweet spot" (I classify that as 1932 to 1936 or so) than you will have a tougher time than if you expand your search forward to '37 to '42 or backwards into the nickel era cars which to my way of thinking are underpriced for the quality and design. You do have to deal with modern fuel problems (easily solved with an electric pump) and some metallurgical problems where poor material were used but these aren't beyond the skill set of anyone familiar with old cars. Good driver quality Model "A" Tudors are still in the $10 to $12 range tops and I mean decent ones - not someone's old bondo buggy. Even roadsters are generally around the $20K mark for a nice one (sales, not always asking price)..Model T's are even cheaper if you look at a later one,

 

Scour Craigslist, Facebook, Ebay, Hemmings, and the other ads. But don't overlook the importance of joining a local region or club. Many of the best buys are never advertised. Go to the Cruise nights and talk to people, go to the local shows and talk to people with cars like those you are interested in - many people only bring one of many cars they own and they may be thinking about parting with one if the right opportunity shows up. I bought a rough Model "A" coupe when I was 11 years old for $50. The meter reader noticed it and got to talking to my mother and told her he had a 1931 Sport Coupe he wanted $100 for. It was in rough but usable shape - it ran, it drove, it passed inspection.. A few days later the milkman knocked on the door and asked my mom if either car was for sale. We sold the coupe for the $50 I had invested. The more people who know you are looking for a car the quicker you will find one. They are out there..

 

 

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I really suggest you check out the ads on the 36-38 Buick Club website. You will find several bargains on it. There are also some that I think are overpriced. The newer ads are on the top, so if it is near the bottom, there is a reason it has not sold, maybe it is overpriced. There is at least one advertised car that while very rare, has what I think is a totally unreasonable price. Most of the ads are in the ballpark of the car's actual value.

 

http://www.3638buickclub.org/advertisements.html 

 

If you do some research, you will find good pre-war cars that are reasonably priced. You simply have to look in the right place.

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I have witnessed the price of many pre war cars dropping over the past five years. Member Trimacar has a 1911 Hupp that is presentable and running for sale this week for 10,500 asking. I purchased a fantastic 1915 T for the same money three years ago. A good Pierce series 80/81 that is ready to tour was available at Hershey this year for 16,500 there are plenty of beginner car available if one looks. I usually look at twenty cars before ai fine one I am willing to purchase........it’s  just work to keep you nose to the grindstone to get what you want. The cars are out there.......how many clubs do you belong to.......join ten or fifteen and keep looking, you’ll find something reasonably quick. Ed

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I'll sell you this handsome 1929 Pontiac Big Six 2-door sedan for $14,000. Right now, ready to go. I just drove it today. I'd invest in a new set of tires, but otherwise it's an older restoration that's still quite tidy.

 

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I will also sell you this mostly original 1940 Ford sedan with Columbia 2-speed rear end and a freshly rebuilt flathead with a Mercury crank inside for $17,000. Proven tour car, same owner for the last 45 years. I have also driven this one quite a bit and it works quite well. Cruises easily at 60 MPH. $17,000.

 

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Both cars are in Cleveland, Ohio and I can help you get them into Canada.

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There are always reasons that one can come up with not to enjoy life.

 

It's too expensive.  It's too far away.  I have no place to put it.  I'm not sure my wife would like it.  I don't want to lose money on it.

 

All foolishness.  If you want to have fun, see things you can't see otherwise, meet people you wouldn't meet otherwise, and just plain enjoy the pride of ownership, buy a car you like and ship it or finance it or rent storage or talk your wife into it.

 

Excuses.  I'm getting sick of them.  Just get out there and have fun...the hobby has made my life so much richer for over 50 years, and one can start now, or keep up the excuses....

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Check Kijiji too.In the Ontario classic car section there is an older restoration 1931 Model A Ford rumble seat coupe for $10,000.It's in the Ottawa area.There has been a 1929 big series McLaughlin-Buick on there for quite a while for $17000.There's a sweet 1934 Plymouth Deluxe sedan for the same money.Those are all in Canadian dollars.Good luck.

Jim

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35 minutes ago, vermontboy said:

But don't overlook the importance of joining a local region or club. Many of the best buys are never advertised. Go to the Cruise nights and talk to people, go to the local shows and talk to people with cars like those you are interested in - many people only bring one of many cars they own and they may be thinking about parting with one if the right opportunity shows up. I bought a rough Model "A" coupe when I was 11 years old for $50. The meter reader noticed it and got to talking to my mother and told her he had a 1931 Sport Coupe he wanted $100 for. It was in rough but usable shape - it ran, it drove, it passed inspection.. A few days later the milkman knocked on the door and asked my mom if either car was for sale. We sold the coupe for the $50 I had invested. The more people who know you are looking for a car the quicker you will find one. They are out there..

 

 

 

You're right, this I have neglected to do... local clubs, thanks!

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24 minutes ago, MCHinson said:

I really suggest you check out the ads on the 36-38 Buick Club website. You will find several bargains on it. There are also some that I think are overpriced. The newer ads are on the top, so if it is near the bottom, there is a reason it has not sold, maybe it is overpriced. There is at least one advertised car that while very rare, has what I think is a totally unreasonable price. Most of the ads are in the ballpark of the car's actual value.

 

http://www.3638buickclub.org/advertisements.html 

 

If you do some research, you will find good pre-war cars that are reasonably priced. You simply have to look in the right place.

 

Thank you for the link... those are increadible machines. Buick's are over my budget for now, but maybe someday.

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29 minutes ago, MCHinson said:

I really suggest you check out the ads on the 36-38 Buick Club website. You will find several bargains on it. There are also some that I think are overpriced. The newer ads are on the top, so if it is near the bottom, there is a reason it has not sold, maybe it is overpriced. There is at least one advertised car that while very rare, has what I think is a totally unreasonable price. Most of the ads are in the ballpark of the car's actual value.

 

http://www.3638buickclub.org/advertisements.html 

 

If you do some research, you will find good pre-war cars that are reasonably priced. You simply have to look in the right place.

 

Jumpin' Jebus, there are some bargains on there!

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What is your budget? That 1937 Century for $12,000 is a deal. It needs some work, but not that much. With a bit of work, it will be worth about twice the asking price. The 1937 Limited is reasonably priced. 

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20 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

I'll sell you this handsome 1929 Pontiac Big Six 2-door sedan for $14,000. Right now, ready to go. I just drove it today. I'd invest in a new set of tires, but otherwise it's an older restoration that's still quite tidy.

 

I will also sell you this mostly original 1940 Ford sedan with Columbia 2-speed rear end and a freshly rebuilt flathead with a Mercury crank inside for $17,000. Proven tour car, same owner for the last 45 years. I have also driven this one quite a bit and it works quite well. Cruises easily at 60 MPH. $17,000.

 

Both cars are in Cleveland, Ohio and I can help you get them into Canada.

 

Superbe! Really nice cars... But the exchange rate makes it impossible for now.

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I have a guy who is really trying to buy my 1937 Century in spite of the fact that I told him I don't want to sell it. I quoted him a crazy price and he is still wanting to come see it. If I sell it, I will probably either buy that Limited or else the 1937 Century from California and pay to have it shipped across the country to me here in NC. I can't believe nobody has bought that Century. The Limited is a very recent ad. It is only for sale due to the owner's death.

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18 minutes ago, trimacar said:

There are always reasons that one can come up with not to enjoy life.

 

It's too expensive.  It's too far away.  I have no place to put it.  I'm not sure my wife would like it.  I don't want to lose money on it.

 

All foolishness.  If you want to have fun, see things you can't see otherwise, meet people you wouldn't meet otherwise, and just plain enjoy the pride of ownership, buy a car you like and ship it or finance it or rent storage or talk your wife into it.

 

Excuses.  I'm getting sick of them.  Just get out there and have fun...the hobby has made my life so much richer for over 50 years, and one can start now, or keep up the excuses....

 

With all respect, I'm not in the lucky position of being able to spend money without considering consequences. Most people like me in the upper middle class need to reach a balance between mortgage, the kids education, travel, good food on the table and hobbies. I am honestly happy people like you can afford to buy many antique cars but in my case, and most guys my age with a bit of money, buying something as a hobby cannot get in the way of more important things.

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17 minutes ago, MCHinson said:

What is your budget? That 1937 Century for $12,000 is a deal. It needs some work, but not that much. With a bit of work, it will be worth about twice the asking price. The 1937 Limited is reasonably priced. 

 

It's a good price, I agree, one of the best bang for buck i've seen... but I'm in Montreal (transport + exchange rate = not a good deal.)

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31 minutes ago, J.H.Boland said:

Check Kijiji too.In the Ontario classic car section there is an older restoration 1931 Model A Ford rumble seat coupe for $10,000.It's in the Ottawa area.There has been a 1929 big series McLaughlin-Buick on there for quite a while for $17000.There's a sweet 1934 Plymouth Deluxe sedan for the same money.Those are all in Canadian dollars.Good luck.

Jim

 

3 minutes ago, PreWarQc said:

 

It's a good price, I agree, one of the best bang for buck i've seen... but I'm in Montreal (transport + exchange rate = not a good deal.)

 

Then check out J.H. Boland's Canadian suggestions. If money is the issue, then avoid the currency exchange hurdle by looking locally. You should join local antique car clubs in your area and you will probably find folks who can give you advice on cars to buy locally. There are many cars that get sold to fellow local club members without ever being advertised elsewhere. 

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I happened to see an episode of Barrett-Jackson during the weekend, which I think dated from 2016. I always expect Barrett-Jackson prices to be high, but there were three good looking Ford Model A coupes that went for between $14K and $22K. Makes some of the prices being asked here in NZ for Model As look expensive.

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I think people put too much stock in asking prices.  Selling a car is hard and the realized price to the seller after commissions, expenses, etc. is much less than what it would seem.

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It's possible it's already sold, or bogus, but I picked up an obscure collector car sales publication yesterday, with an ad for a 1937 Lincoln Zephyr Coupe in ON. No photo, no mention of engine, claims it is complete and not rusty. $2,500. Maybe it has dogs living in it, or the ad's just there as a joke. It was in Classic Car Round-Up Magazine out of Jane Lew, WV.  I used to get their Truck Round-Up mag 15 years ago, but they are both hard to get out west.   

 

P.S.: If you don't seriously consider that Roaring Twenties Pontiac in Cleveland, you should check if you have a pulse.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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2 hours ago, trimacar said:

 

 

Excuses.  I'm getting sick of them.  Just get out there and have fun...the hobby has made my life so much richer for over 50 years, and one can start now, or keep up the excuses....

 

Wow, what a terrific and welcoming response this is. :huh:

 

Here is a young fellow posing a very real question and he's up against a very real barrier of the high cost involved to get into this hobby. 

I'm certain you're an older guy now who's made a bunch of money in this game so it's probably easy to blow off a potential new/young hobbiest with comments like the one you posted, but don't forget, back in the 60's when you got into this hobby it was a LOT more affordable. There were no Barrett Jackson type shows driving the prices into the stratosphere.

I have read, over and over on this forum, posts asking how we're going to get younger people interested and involved. Maybe reaching out and offering helpful advice instead of an admonishment for not having deep pockets would be a good place to start. 

Kudos to those who did offer affordable leads to our new friend.

 

PreWarQc, follow the advice of the helpful members here, check regularly on the "Cars For Sale" forum here. Many will post links to very affordable craigslist ads that pop up every few weeks. The right one will come along. In the mean time, post here with questions when you find a potential candidate. You can get a lot of good (and free) advice on which models to follow and which to steer clear of, value, condition, etc.

Good Luck with your search!

Greg

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I'm not trying to be too critical, but I have not seen PreWarQc respond to the questions about what he's really locking for. Pre-war  covers a lot of ground. Are you talking about late 30's fat fendered, late 20's-30's Classic era, 20's or earlier non Classic, or even earlier? What do you consider affordable? In the fifty years that I have been collecting cars, I have never seen the supply better, or the the prices more affordable then they are now. Are you looking for a turn-key or will you accept some level of a project?

 

It shouldn't come as a surprise that we old timers were young once too. We had to go through the same balancing act, that you are faced with today. I don't remember complaining about people who were unwilling to part with their cars, and at a price that I wanted to pay for them. Whatever that price may be, in your case. Normally I would suggest patience, but in your case you have waited for ten years and still not been able to find what you want. I think that it might be time for some soul searching. This may not be a question of current owners and the market, but one of your ability to make a decision. The world is yours to make a choice from an amazing selection of cars available today, then it's a matter of determining what you can afford and  getting to where you need to be, to get it into your garage. Have you considered financing? Credit is still very affordable and available. That's the way I bought my first Classic Pierce Arrow, some forty two years ago, when credit was much less affordable then it is today. I personally have always thought that it is strange that a person who will finance a $40K pickup, may never consider financing a $20K collector car.

 

I doubt that many of us old timers worried about what the market would be in ten years, or about the exchange rate of currency, when we started in the hobby. Most of us have had to pass on a car because we just couldn't get to where we needed to be. It also shouldn't come as a shock that no mater how old some of us get, that we still have our unfulfilled dreams.  

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6 hours ago, jeff_a said:

It's possible it's already sold, or bogus, but I picked up an obscure collector car sales publication yesterday, with an ad for a 1937 Lincoln Zephyr Coupe in ON. No photo, no mention of engine, claims it is complete and not rusty. $2,500. Maybe it has dogs living in it, or the ad's just there as a joke. It was in Classic Car Round-Up Magazine out of Jane Lew, WV.  I used to get their Truck Round-Up mag 15 years ago, but they are both hard to get out west.   

 

I'm pretty sure its missing a 0. They have a website?

 

6 hours ago, jeff_a said:

P.S.: If you don't seriously consider that Roaring Twenties Pontiac in Cleveland, you should check if you have a pulse.

 

Agreed, I do sometimes see good deals in the states but I sadly have to add 30% to the asking price plus shipping; I'm in Canada.

 

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