auburnseeker

First time I've seen that phrase in a for sale ad

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I just found this ad on Craigslist of course.  

 

I've never heard anyone use this term "on road until several years ago"

Almost the same as ran when new isn't it? 

It would help if they took the tarp off for the photo as well. 

https://newjersey.craigslist.org/cto/d/1949-dodge-coronet-coupe/6600526337.html

 

78 k, flat 6, on road until several years ago, will need battery/tune-up/etc. Good tires, some spare parts. Won't take much to drive to first show. Great entry level rat rod. I need to sell to fund another project. Paperwork from NY to request title in NJ.
Best reasonable offer.

 

 I wonder if the other project is under the tarp in the back ground. 

00N0N_aCOKjHZll0p_600x450.jpg

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I’m not sure how much extra the tree dirt adds to the value either.  Amazing how poorly presented car ads can be.  It’s not like Craigslist charges by the word or picture.

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What does "Paperwork from NY to request title in NJ.", mean?  Does that mean that it has no title, but maybe the buyer could get one in N.J.?

 

Cheers,

Grog

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It probably means he purchased it from someone in NY and filled out paperwork to title in NJ but never officially finished the transaction with the state. Just a guess. 

Dave S 

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2 hours ago, Tinindian said:

It certainly is NOT a flat 6.

Should be a flat 6, meaning flathead straight 6, as Dodge didn't have a flat 8 at the time. Too early for a hemi. 

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Wikipedia confirms 1949 Dodge had the flat 6, not a flat 8. Chrysler had the flat 8, last year for that is 1950.

 

Not that Wikipedia is the absolute answer to automotive questions, but it is reasonably right.😉

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26 minutes ago, Frank DuVal said:

Wikipedia confirms 1949 Dodge had the flat 6, not a flat 8. Chrysler had the flat 8, last year for that is 1950.

 

Not that Wikipedia is the absolute answer to automotive questions, but it is reasonably right.😉

Flat refers to a "pancake" configuration like Subaru uses and Corvair and VW used to use.  An L-head engine is often/generally referred to as a flat head.

A direct cut and paste from Wikipedia says "A flat-six or horizontally opposed-six is a flat engine with six cylinders arranged horizontally in two banks of three cylinders on each side of a central crankcase. This should not be confused with the Opposed-piston engine. The pistons are mounted to the crankshaft such that opposing pistons move back and forth in opposite directions at the same time"

engine type.jpg

pancake.jpg

Edited by Tinindian (see edit history)
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Ha! As a multiple Corvair owner and rebuilder, I know what a flat 6 is, but I translate quick from flat to flat head for all those references to regular inline engines.

 

You win, Tinindian, that Dodge probably does NOT have a Corvair engine in it!😁

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FWIW, New York didn't issue titles until the 1973 model year.  Older vehicles have a 'transferable registration' that can be signed-over to the next owner.  New Jersey, on the other hand, titles all vehicles regardless of age.   Sometimes the NJ Motor Vehicle Commission can be hard to deal with when it comes to out-of-state paperwork.....I've experienced it first-hand!

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Being from back in the day when flathead 6 engines were plentiful, before the overhead valve engines came into our lives, the phrase "flat 6 " was known to all of us, back then.

 

The younger folks out there do not necessarily know the phrases we accepted so well.

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I have not seen any factory information that ever called an L-head engine a flat engine.  A flat engine is an engine with horizontally opposed pistons or an engine like the Commer Ts3 Diesel  engine in which the pancake design had the six pistons facing one another in three cylinders.

Common misusage does not make it correct.

smallts3_2[1].gif

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9 hours ago, TerryB said:

I’m not sure how much extra the tree dirt adds to the value either.  Amazing how poorly presented car ads can be.  It’s not like Craigslist charges by the word or picture.

These days you're just supposed to fork over your hard earned cash with the most minimal effort from the seller possible presenting their vehicle... Its easier for them that way.

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3 hours ago, bobg1951chevy said:

Being from back in the day when flathead 6 engines were plentiful, before the overhead valve engines came into our lives, the phrase "flat 6 " was known to all of us, back then.

 

The younger folks out there do not necessarily know the phrases we accepted so well.

"Flat" may be regional.  In Califunny during the late '50s and early '60s, the only "flat" engines were VW, Porsche, and Corvair, but we had a lot of flatHEADS.

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Same in WA (70s, 80s). If someone said "flat 6" I would be looking for the Corvair (or the Tucker).

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12 hours ago, Tinindian said:

I have not seen any factory information that ever called an L-head engine a flat engine.  A flat engine is an engine with horizontally opposed pistons or an engine like the Commer Ts3 Diesel  engine in which the pancake design had the six pistons facing one another in three cylinders.

Common misusage does not make it correct.

smallts3_2[1].gif

I believe some Hall-Scott and A.E.C inline 6-cylinder engines were 'laid flat' in transit buses.  As well, some Toyota vans (Previa) also have an inline four laid at nearly 0° under the floor.

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)

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1 hour ago, 8E45E said:

I believe some Hall-Scott and A.E.C inline 6-cylinder engines were 'laid flat' in transit buses.  As well, some Toyota vans (Sienna) also have an inline four laid at nearly 0° under the floor.

 

Craig

The only photos I can find of the not lamented Toyota Sienna mini van four cylinder engine seem to show a rather conventional  layout Is this what you were talking about?

 

IMG_20130402_223059_846.jpg

Edited by plymouthcranbrook (see edit history)

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 Clear title?

 If the NY paperwork is not made out to the buyer that is going to be requesting the title, lots of luck.

 

 Can you say Title Skipping?

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Flat 6 is slang here in the Northeast and well known.  Obviously a car guy with a half a brain would realize that flathead 6 was referred to.  I guess the PC crowd is offended again.  Geeze. 

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Not all "flat" engines are opposed.  Over the years, I've encountered a few "flat" inline engines in industrial or marine settings.  The one I remember best was the "Inclined" GM 6-71 diesel used in marine applications.  As I remember, we called them "lay-down Jimmies", and were not perfectly flat, but were "inclined" 70° - 80° from the vertical.  "Flat" GM 6-110 diesels were also used in some self-propelled rail cars known as "Buddliners" which used two of the 6-110 diesel engines.

 

"Flat" reciprocating aircraft engines are termed "opposed" and use the letter "O" to designate the type. 

 

The first "flat" horizontally-opposed engines were called "boxer" engines.

 

This is all starting to make my head hurt, so I'll just continued calling horizontally-opposed reciprocating engines, "flat engines".

 

Attached (I hope) is a photo of a brochure for the "flat" GM diesels.

 

Cheers,

Grog

 

6-71 Inclined diesel engine.png

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Maybe the Toyota vans of the 80s, before Previn and Sienna. But who could tell from the picture? See interesting article:

 

http://www.curbsideclassic.com/curbside-classics-asian/cars-of-a-lifetime-1987-toyota-4x4-van-you-just-cant-kill-it-no-matter-how-hard-a-certain-somebody-tries/

 

Also, the Nissan Van of the same time peroid is the only vehicle sold in the US that had a recall of all units sold, bought them back from the owners and destroyed.

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1 hour ago, Frank DuVal said:

Maybe the Toyota vans of the 80s, before Previn and Sienna. But who could tell from the picture? See interesting article:

 

http://www.curbsideclassic.com/curbside-classics-asian/cars-of-a-lifetime-1987-toyota-4x4-van-you-just-cant-kill-it-no-matter-how-hard-a-certain-somebody-tries/

 

Also, the Nissan Van of the same time peroid is the only vehicle sold in the US that had a recall of all units sold, bought them back from the owners and destroyed.

 

The Previa has the "flat" engine under the van. That earlier Toyota (and the recalled Nissan) do not have flat engines, They are both laid out like a Dodge A-100, with the engine between the front seats.

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