auburnseeker

First time I've seen that phrase in a for sale ad

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5 hours ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

The only photos I can find of the not lamented Toyota Sienna mini van four cylinder engine seem to show a rather conventional  layout Is this what you were talking about?

 

 

Yep, Previa, before the Sienna. My error which I've corrected.

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)

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1 hour ago, Frank DuVal said:

Maybe the Toyota vans of the 80s, before Previn and Sienna. But who could tell from the picture? See interesting article:

 

http://www.curbsideclassic.com/curbside-classics-asian/cars-of-a-lifetime-1987-toyota-4x4-van-you-just-cant-kill-it-no-matter-how-hard-a-certain-somebody-tries/

 

Also, the Nissan Van of the same time peroid is the only vehicle sold in the US that had a recall of all units sold, bought them back from the owners and destroyed.

The same was almost true for the 1922 copper-cooled Chevrolet that was recalled by GM.  All were returned except for two owners adamantly refused to return theirs, and one still survives.

 

Craig

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First time I recall seeing "boxer" was related to the Ferrari Boxer. VW was a "flat four" and Corvair a "flat six". Ford had a "Flathead". My '59 had a DOHC cross flow head. And then there were Subarus.

 

Of course Hemis were for Chryslers and garbage trucks but have long outlived their usefulness (if it had four valve heads it would not be a Hemi). And then there was the '63 Chevvy "mystery engine" with porcupine heads, Round Port Pontiacs, and Tunnel Port Fords.

 

Maybe because grew up in Souf but do not recall in my yout a flathead being called anything but a flathead.

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It use to run, at least until it was in such bad shape that couldn't start any more.   Also know as it "was running when parked".  Means it has not run in years because nobody knew what was wrong with it.

Needs a little TLC means it needs everything.  What's a ton of scrap metal worth these days?
 

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12 hours ago, Paul Dobbin said:

It use to run, at least until it was in such bad shape that couldn't start any more.   Also know as it "was running when parked".  Means it has not run in years because nobody knew what was wrong with it.

Needs a little TLC means it needs everything.  What's a ton of scrap metal worth these days?
 

About $200 per ton around here, unless its in the shape of a car... then you can increase the price by thousands.

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But then there is NOS/NIB = didn't work so was put back on shelf.

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I have a different perspective on the "on the road until several years ago". I find it a refreshing attempt at honesty, the opposite of "I don't know how long it's been sitting" or "ran when parked". Assuming the seller is honest "on the road until several years ago" conveys some valuable info. Good to know that the car has not been sitting since the 1960s.  I have a 1955 vintage car that I know personally has not been driven or even started since 1969. Isn't that info that  buyer might want to know?

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On 5/27/2018 at 12:40 PM, auburnseeker said:

ve never heard anyone use this term "on road until several years ago

Tires only flat on one side. 

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"Engine disassembled for your inspection."  From a Hemmings ad 30 years ago.....

  • Haha 1

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On ‎5‎/‎28‎/‎2018 at 1:16 AM, Tinindian said:

I have not seen any factory information that ever called an L-head engine a flat engine.  A flat engine is an engine with horizontally opposed pistons or an engine like the Commer Ts3 Diesel  engine in which the pancake design had the six pistons facing one another in three cylinders.

Common misusage does not make it correct.

smallts3_2[1].gif

Misusage only to your way of thinking, Mr. Tinindian.

I do not believe anyone  stated that "flathead" or "flat 6 " was a term used by the factory.

At any rate, the terminology " flathead 6" or "flathead" or " flat 6" was around, long before the Corvair in 1960.

It's how that type of engine was known, back then.

The 216 and 235 Chevy 6 cylinder engines  were known as "stovebolts" ....... but no factory information validated that phrase either.

 

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If we ant to get picky every old car has a motor according to most people,  but that is alot worse than a flat 6 because most except the early electrics really have an engine.  Though there are publications from the 50's and earlier that were even called Motor news,  though the entire magazine didn't have one electric powered vehicle. 

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Auburn, Motor is still with us, I get it every month. It is aimed at service shops. Still a Hearst publication, since 1903.

 

Of course, now they DO discuss electric propulsion motors from time to time!

 

 

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