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Dave B.

1934 Packard 1108 Dietrich Victoria project

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While paging through BarnFinds.com, I ran across this car listed as being for sale on ebay.

I searched the AACA site, but couldn't find any reference to it.

Looks to be a bit pricey, but who knows? Someone might strike a deal!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/253613026992?rmvSB=true

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I'm the guy on barn finds trying to explain to everyone that the car has new coachwork.    I guess  people think it is possible that something that would be a 7 figure project (to start) would just pop up on eBay.

 

image.png.e000ee263694c1e1c93827b14a4db42b.png

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Not that I doubt your experience with cars of this stature, have you actually seen it in person ? I know the chance of a genuine car like this being listed on ebay is slight to say the least, but we are dealing with a family member {daughter} that might have no connection with the regular Classic car world. Perhaps she has had good luck selling household items on ebay and thought why not try the car and see what happens. Stranger things have happened in the strange world of vintage cars.

  Is there any obvious signs that this is a replacement body apart from the curious marketing?  Many of us have not seen a car like this except in photo's  and lack your knowledge of what a genuine example should look like "in the metal". 

 Once again I am not doubting your verdict of real vs replacement however can you share the things about the car itself that don't ring true.

 

Greg in Canada

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Well, a lot of hints that it's not a factory nor period custom body.

 

Doors have no holes yet for outside door handles.  Door hinges look unfinished and not aligned.  New wood inside, with latch cobbled on, not fitted correctly.  Metal at top of doors, where it attaches to wood, odd projections for screws.  Unfinished cowl with no obvious provision for fitting a dash.  New wood buck for making a trunk, suggesting the "continuation" of making a body.

 

That's at first glance.

 

Could still be a handsome project, as long as one realizes what they're buying....

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Yes, Gordon's daily driver. I have always liked the style. Gurney Nutting did it best.

 

image.png.253934b72c916841c183852cbb630815.png

 

Lots of louvers. But it is a popular style. I even have notebooks from my school days with rear bodies ending perpendicular to the axle. Imagine those old coachbuilders getting their hands on just a few of the tools available to a hobbyist today.

 

The story on the old guy that left the topic car behind must be a good one. I like that kind of stuff.

Bernie

 

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I agree that all of the evidence points to a replica body. However a fellow old car guy that I knew locally was at about the same stage on the restoration of a early LaSalle roadster when he unfortunately passed away. The car was a genuine Roadster {possibly a Cabriolet, it was several years ago and my memory the exact body style  is slightly foggy} but when bought the body was badly rusted, from the wet PNW climate. He had a very skilled metal man remake nearly all the sheet metal essentially re- creating a new body. Could this car be a 95 % finished similar story ? 

How would the classic car world view a correctly re-bodied badly damaged Packard Victoria? Perhaps not as valuable as an original body car however I would think a lot more legitimate than a re-bodied lesser car.

 I am not saying this is the case with this car but how would you know for sure without further study of the car in question.

Greg in Canada

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There are no “missing” or “unknown” Packard Custom Dietrich cars left. Like Duesenberg, they have been tracked for MANY years, and several books have been published on them. If it were real, it would be worth 750k as it sits. And it would have sold in ten minutes. A real one can be purchased currently, at a multiple of the 750........several multiples. Just look in Edward Blend’s book, if you can find one....they sell for over one thousand dollars............yup, I have seen them bring that kind of money recently. I got mine for twenty bucks! 👍

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Thanks Ed !, That clears up any doubt. There are a few of us that find cars like this very interesting but have no first hand experience with them. Classic cars are something that I have an academic interest in, but like many of us no possible chance of owning. And custom body Classic's are obviously a significant step beyond standard production body Classics.

 The only Packard I will likely ever own is my 1918 series E  2 1/2 ton truck, basket case.  I like it a lot, however barely from the same planet as a Packard 12 car.

 

Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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It it were real the seller would be advertising it as such and the price would be several multiples of what he is asking and it would have sold instantly. 

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Ed which Blend book, curious as I have one, the auto, autobiography, a great read.  I am not looking to sell, but maybe i can call it an investmemt!  😆

 

Great to hear, BTW, you reading up on PACKARD!!! 😆

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)

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If it's "The Magnificent Packard12 of 1934" I have an autographed copy given to me by Ed. I suspected by the way it is written that it originally was written as a dissertation for a Master's or other degree. Ed confirmed my suspicions and admitted that it was not accepted as such.

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Also the car advertised has no cowl ventilators as originally built. Totally new body but nevertheless would make a beautiful, if fake, car. 

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