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emjay

Studebakers, never to late to learn.

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I've been noticing the early Studebakers (and some later ones) that show up in the general discussions and now I think dad (born 1911) was keeping secrets from us.  They had some very interesting and unique designs which would appeal to the non-main stream types that our family is .  He was a big Model T Ford man and may have been trying to avoid temptation but might explain why his first brand new car was a 1960 6 cylinder Lark wagon with an automatic.  I learned several years ago that Studebaker had some great V8s into the fifties but you had to be patient with that Lark since it took a couple seconds for the torque converter to start moving the car.  I just wanted to comment that I'm starting to admire Studebakers in a whole new light. 

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Welcome to Studebaker clan.

I fell in love with Studebaker in 1953 when I first saw a 

new Starliner in Amsterdam where I was born.

Robert Kapteyn

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23 hours ago, emjay said:

I've been noticing the early Studebakers (and some later ones) that show up in the general discussions and now I think dad (born 1911) was keeping secrets from us.  They had some very interesting and unique designs which would appeal to the non-main stream types that our family is .  He was a big Model T Ford man and may have been trying to avoid temptation but might explain why his first brand new car was a 1960 6 cylinder Lark wagon with an automatic.  I learned several years ago that Studebaker had some great V8s into the fifties but you had to be patient with that Lark since it took a couple seconds for the torque converter to start moving the car.  I just wanted to comment that I'm starting to admire Studebakers in a whole new light. 

They actually had great V-8's in to the sixties but, it's the general consensus in the Studebaker world that the 170 Champion Six is much preferred with a standard transmission, preferably with overdrive if it's to be used on the open road.

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We were a two Studebaker family for a while.  After the purchase of the Lark, a coworker of dad's traded in a 51 Starlight for a Morris Minor and dad bought it from the dealer has his go to work car which retired his 41 Chevy.  The he pull a few parts off the Champ at the end including the overdrive.  The front of the Lark is hanging on the wall as a souvenir.  I still have a few parts hanging around.

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Studebaker was a surviving independent, a rarity for sure. I could make and argument that it was the last of the independents, but regardless they had to be doing something right. In any era I could show you something that is so special that that you could not help but be impressed with. "Different my design" really did catch the character of the company's products. It was how they survived for over 100 years!  

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Different By Design.   Just a typo correction.😉

 

Studebaker made the change from horse drawn to horsepower!☺️

 

They had an overhead valve V-8 before Ford, Chevrolet, Pontiac, Packard or Buick. Same year as Chrysler. They teamed with Borg-Warner aka Detroit Gear to have an automatic in 1950, "Automatic Drive". Beat out Ford. 😊

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Personal observation from many decades in the car hobby and member of many clubs over those years.  I maintain membership in the Studebaker Drivers club though no longer having any Stude because it is the most outstanding publication of the best run club in the old car hobby!

 

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