Tom Laferriere

1935 Lincoln K - Series 541 Sedan

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1935 Lincoln K Series 541 Sedan

Chassis no. K4223
Motor no. K4223

 

150 bhp, 414 cu. in. L-head V-12, three-speed manual transmission, front and rear semi-elliptic leaf springs with full floating rear axle, and Bendix four-wheel power-assisted drum brakes. Wheelbase: 136 in.

 

In 1935 Lincoln moved the coachwork on its 145-inch and 136-inch chassis forward by several inches, offering an improved ride and lower center of gravity. The Series 541 represented the shorter 136-inch wheelbase and as such was used for two-door and close-coupled four-door bodies like this lovely sedan.

 

Only 170 examples of this two-window, five-passenger Style 543 were produced. According to a copy of its Lincoln Automobile Record supplied by The Benson Ford Research Center, this car chassis K4223 was shipped Feb 18, 1935 and was originally finished in Paris Grey. It’s history is quite interesting, having always been a well-kept Massachusetts car from new and owing to its thoughtful caretakers even retains all of its original interior.

 

Fortunately, its story can be told thanks to an original Massachusetts vehicle registration document which identifies an E. Pardee from the affluent beach community of Harwich Port, Cape Cod. Genealogical research reveals this owner to be Edith Pardee, a lady whose father was a notable coal baron from Hazleton, Pennsylvania and also one of the founders of Lafayette College. Miss Pardee visited Hazleton often so it is likely that many miles were accrued on trips between the Cape and Eastern Pennsylvania. In 1946 Miss Pardee passed at the age of 83 and her Lincoln, barely a decade old, likely remained locally for some time thereafter.

 

In the 1950s or 1960s it was acquired by Daniel Baird Wesson II, great-grandson of the inventor and firearms manufacturer of Smith & Wesson fame. Under Wesson’s ownership it was reportedly stored in a warehouse behind the Roosevelt Avenue S&W factory in Springfield where Wesson family members kept personal property. After leaving S&W in 1963, he founded his namesake Dan Wesson Arms in 1968. Around this time it was acquired by well-known parts purveyor Nelson B. Pease of Palmer, who collected the car from Wesson at the warehouse.

 

Pease sold it to John Brill of Westfield. Under Brill’s ownership the car was cosmetically restored in its current shade of Ascot Maroon and it remained with his family for the ensuing five decades. Amazingly the interior remains 100% original, owing to the good care and service it received under a small number of conscientious owners. The odometer records 76,000 original miles, and the car has recently been cosmetically detailed as well as having received a basic mechanical service and inspection.  Starts easily, runs great, drives nicely.

 

The sale of this car is accompanied by copies of its delivery documentation, early registration record, biographical information on the Pardee family, as well as a photo from the 1960s showing its excellent condition at the time. Mrs. Pardee’s Lincoln represents exceptional value as a multi-cylinder CCCA Full Classic and would be a wonderful entry-level tour car. 

 

Located in Smithfield, RI and the price is $39,500 for a quick sale.  Full photos here:  http://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1935-lincoln-k-541-sedan

 

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Edited by Tom Laferriere
Grammar and edits (see edit history)
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When you think of what a 32 33 or 34 flathead in good shape costs why  wouldn't you buy this!  The paint color might have a limited appeal. I will never understand peoples taste in choosing the best color for a car. Dark green or a cobalt blue? and black is always good. Back then there were many choices.

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What,You will have over 20 grand,and more in a model a.I have done one.Now,you get a great car,full classicYou can drive,i am all in.Not a better turn key out there,wish we had room

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35 minutes ago, cahartley said:

ENTRY level?....... :blink:

 

Go find a cheaper 1930s 12-cylinder Full Classic. I'll wait.

 

And a club sedan no less!

 

This car is a win. If you want a big Classic, you won't find more car for your money than this. If I didn't just buy two cars to keep for myself, I'd would have already given Tom a deposit on this one.

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3 hours ago, Lawrence Helfand said:

When you think of what a 32 33 or 34 flathead in good shape costs why  wouldn't you buy this!  The paint color might have a limited appeal. I will never understand peoples taste in choosing the best color for a car. Dark green or a cobalt blue? and black is always good. Back then there were many choices.

Personally,  i think this is the best color for this car. If only I had both the money and space for this one...

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I like it.  Problem is I spent all my money to build the space to keep a car or small fleet of them,  now I have no money to actually buy any to put in the space. :(

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With an original interior like THAT , you can forget about what color the car is. Just hanging out in it , parked in the garage or in motion , sitting front seat or back ..........................         - CC

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You will easily spend the difference plus in those 2 cars prices putting the 39 in the shape this 35 is in and I believe the 35 is a more desirable car to start with.  Plus this one is ready to go now,  not in a couple of years. 

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On 3/14/2018 at 8:18 PM, Matt Harwood said:

 

Go find a cheaper 1930s 12-cylinder Full Classic. I'll wait.

 

And a club sedan no less!

 

This car is a win. If you want a big Classic, you won't find more car for your money than this. If I didn't just buy two cars to keep for myself, I'd would have already given Tom a deposit on this one.

 

The ad SAYS: "multi-cylinder CCCA Full Classic and would be a wonderful entry-level tour car" period....NOT V12 or ANYTHING else.

 

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I'm often amused that in CCCA-speak, "multi-cylinder" means "more than 8 cylinders" rather than in normal English "more than one..."

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When I think of entry level Full Classics, the Cadillac 60 Special and other Cadillacs as well as the Lincoln Continental come to mind.  Maybe a few Sr. Packards.  This car is unique in that it is a little less common, in a way.  The other cars mentioned are nice, and actually cars we are thinking about.  But, when one looks at CCCA tour coverage, 50% or more of the cars are what I listed.  The rest are usually higher end Packard, A CD cars, PA, cars out of my price range anyway.   This one is a little unusual and fits somewhere in between, which is why it's interesting, as well as condition and a fair price, typical for Tom.  Yes, it's priced a bit more than some other "entry" Classics but very modest in terms of CCCA cars. I think that's what he is saying.  ☺

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Nice car, at a CCCA event this car would stand out, as mentioned there are some "common" cars that seem to show up in abundance at CCCA meets.  And, by common, I mean relatively speaking in the world of Full Classics.

 

This is an attractive car at a fair price and would give someone a lot of fun.  Can't imagine it won't sell in a timely manner, if I have my double negative correct.....

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  Yes, the car is wonderful, just the type of cars that I like, plus the color combo is great. However, it's going to be a hard sell, even at that fair asking price. Very few people are buying anymore. At least on this site. I do not like to say this but it's true and I know a number of you agree 100% because we already spoke in person. This site is more for just talking and admiring which is fine. It's not a site to sell cars. Ebay, Craigslist or an Auction House will work. Can anyone here honestly say they sold a car directly through the AACA forums?

Edited by RICHELIEUMOTORCAR (see edit history)
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Well, I  met Tom here who has become a good friend, we bought, traded and I have consigned after but the forum was the catalyst. 

 

We haved a project car listed here and a couple other sites right now.  12 or so inquiries, 2 serious, 1 from here still in play,  1 from elsewhere.   10 email, phone number collectors, same as any where else I think...

 

I think others have bought and sold here also. 

 

Still the best place to meet and network with other hobbyists.

 

 ☺

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
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