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Buicks to disappear?

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Mis-leading headline.  The article says only that the badges that say "BUICK" will be dropped for 2019.

 

Like many other cars, Buick will rely to a greater extent on its logo for identification, beginning with the 2019 models.  If you look at Chevrolet, Mercedes-Benz, Audi, etc., you will see that this is common practice in the industry.

 

The article does not imply that Buick as an automotive brand will disappear.

 

 

 

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I think they all should have their name in big block letters on all four sides so I can tell them apart....................Bob

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A very in-depth commentary on "Seeking Alpha" website.  Sales numbers, USA and China.  Also indicates where the growth is in the brand and how the "sedans" are not "sales leaders".  As long as China Buicks are selling in large numbers in China, there will be "a Buick".

 

The issue of using nameplates, logos, and alpha-numeric model designations seems to be somewhat cyclical, except for Mercedes.  Seems to depend upon "the latest" thoughts on that issue.  OR if one brand changes to something and it works for them, others surely follow.  By observation, the longest-running USA brand model designations were "names" of special places, not alpha-numeric combinations.

 

NTX5467

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15 hours ago, Centurion said:

Like many other cars, Buick will rely to a greater extent on its logo for identification, beginning with the 2019 models.  If you look at Chevrolet, Mercedes-Benz, Audi, etc., you will see that this is common practice in the industry.

 

Agreed.  We should keep in mind that the market is world wide. 

So, brand names are often meaningless in other countries; especially those countries that do not use our lettering system.

Edited by Mark Shaw (see edit history)

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Is there anything specific to Buick besides the name? Corporate platforms, corporate engines, corporate transmissions; what makes a current Buick a Buick?

 

Three weeks ago I tried out a gently used 2017 Cadillac XTS, which is a Buick Lacrosse, which is a Chevy Impala, which is closely tied to a Malibu. I had read a lot of good reviews, but drove away without looking back.

The sad part is that I walked in really wanting it to be a car I would like. I think because of my car hobby I am too closely connected to standards of the past. I am looking for the $3,500 car of 1960, the $25,000 car of 1996, which works out to the $100,000 car of 2018. It don't work that way.

 

I, honestly, don't think there are any Buicks anymore. Which is fine with me. There are some nice choices in the hundred years of predecessors. And I know how to keep them going.

 

Bernie

 

 

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IF they aren't proud enough of their product to put the name on it, then, well...I could go on, but I won't.

This has to rank right up there with some of the stupidest decisions and moves Buick has ever made. The elimination of the LeSabre name and line of cars springs to mind--right when LeSabre had all sorts of awards and quality prizes, a sterling reputation and a loyal product following, and they eliminated it from the lineup in the early 2000s. Same type of bone-headed thinking behind this latest move...

 

Pete Phillips, BCA #7338

Edited by Pete Phillips (see edit history)
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Today's cars within given price brackets are pretty much all the same, little more than a commodity. Might as well buy them by color.........Bob

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I don't know  that the brand means much to us except it is on the "old" cars we love.

When was the last Buick made that might be collectable?   Many of you know I think it was the Reatta but the last one built was 27 year ago. 

Is there a collectable Buick in the past 27 years?  Will there ever be another?

I don't know who get the credit (Pete or the BCA office) but Buick is buying advertising space in the Bugle and I hope they can continue.

Are most of us still buying new Buicks as a knee jerk reaction because we own old Buicks.....if you didn't have an old Buick,  would you buy a new Buick?

 

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I don't think this is new, out and about today, saw many Chevrolet's with no name, maybe a truck but all the cars and SUVs did not say Chevrolet on them and this is where they were born, so read some more articles, the new generation can't read, they like "logos" LOL!!!!

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The cars on the dealer lots are mostly floor planned with interest paid monthly. The cars driving out with new owners are leaving in significant numbers as lease cars. "Real" purchases are being made on 2 and three year old off lease cars. Not many cars are being sold in the traditional way "sold" has been defined.

 

The fresh Asian market saved Buick shortly after Pontiac followed Olds into the hole. And the Asian market is finding cars built less than a boat ride away. Most nations the US considers as third world countries have successful business models based on buying capital assets and leasing their service; fewer actual owners. Pay computer kiosks are common in other countries, only in major airports in the US. But that $700 smartphone in your pocket may be due for a precedented change.

 

Buick buyers are tight with their money as a rule, not a good market. And the old guys are resistant to the leases.

 

And the generally have a superior temperament. The Baldridge awards, pollsters basically asked Buick owners how pleased they were with their purchase, pretty much asking the Buick buyer if he thought he made a smart decision. You might get a Ford or a Chrysler buyer to admit they made a mistake, but you are going to go a long way before a Buick owner says they did anything dumb. Of course they won the satisfaction award. Buick owners are satisfied with themselves. No kidding!

 

It is harder for me to buy a daily driver. I am a torque driver. I don't want some buzzing small engine that cranks out horsepower at speeds I thought turbochargers are supposed to run at. I want the engine longitudinal and the back wheels pushing. When I tried out that Cadillac a couple weeks ago the sales manager asked what they could do to make me want it. I said "Add mass." I don't want to drive a car where I can tell when each wheel thumps a tar strip and which wheel it was. I want power at the low end and I want to ride in my living room. "Sorry, Sir, we can't do that."

I have it and I know where I can get more. Be happy I, at least stopped in and tried out your little green eggs and ham car. Sam don't want it either.

 

I used to teach an apprenticeship program. I had a big focus on differentials and change of states. Anyone from my classes will tell you "Bernie said if it doesn't change it is dead. Change is how we recognize life.

 

The car business is changing.

Bernie

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, Pete Phillips said:

IF they aren't proud enough of their product to put the name on it, then, well...I could go on, but I won't.

This has to rank right up there with some of the stupidest decisions and moves Buick has ever made. The elimination of the LeSabre name and line of cars springs to mind--right when LeSabre had all sorts of awards and quality prizes, a sterling reputation and a loyal product following, and they eliminated it from the lineup in the early 2000s. Same type of bone-headed thinking behind this latest move...

 

Pete Phillips, BCA #7338

 

I understand the discussion on putting the name on the car, but if you are old enough to remember when Shell removed their name from the sign and only have the yellow shell on the sign.  Very highly identifiable.

 

Maybe this is just another experiment with the tri-shield to see what type of brand value the tri-shield has in the market place.  Only time will tell if this is a good move.  I am somewhat skeptical.

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I respectfully submit that many of the "marketing" orientations are advocated by people who have LITTLE real knowledge of effectively marking products in a compelling manner.  Remember when Cadillac went from "names" to "letters of the names"?  Eldorado Touring Coupe became the Cadillac ETC.  Somebody obviously signed-off on that!  DTS would have been "DeVille Touring Sedan".  Mercedes, BMW, and others have used alpha-numeric names as model designations for ages, BUT the progression of letters and numbers actually mean something of which model it is, which engine size, and "FI" or "Carb".  So it all makes some sense, that way, IF you care to understand it.  Kind of bland, in some cases.

 

The USA brands typically used names for their vehicles.  Names which alluded to vehicular properties . . . grace, elegance, luxury, toughness, speed, power, or some desirable geographic location.  Going far beyond "Special", "Deluxe", or "Custom".  If you cared, it could be a nice geography lesson!  And then there were the model designations which meant "hardtop", too.  And with all of the theatrics in the car commercials, those names had real capabilities for sounding spectacular AND aspirational.  A way of making them seem "exciting" and "something a customer would want to go see in person".  In that orientation, can you imagine some alpha-numeric designation generating that same level of excitement?  Just the names "Buick", "Chevrolet", "Pontiac", "Oldsmobile", and "Cadillac" had those theatrical qualities by themselves.

 

I suspect that one reason Buick sedans have not sold well is the price point they are at.  That's MY suspicion.  The high-selling Encore is a very nice vehicle at a good price point for what it is.  If it were not an SUV-type, it would be a tiny sedan that couldn't carry very much at all.  The Envision is a little larger and has an instrument panel design that is unlike other GM vehicles, which is GOOD!  The current Lacrosse is a very nice car, but looked bloated to me.  It looks better in some colors than others.

 

The "Lucerne" came about due to a request by the dealers that they wanted a name that was not the same as they'd had before.  A new model name that would draw people into the Buick showrooms to see "a new Buick", rather than a name they were familiar with.  Unfortunately, as good as the Lucerne might have been, it was as unremarkable as the name it was given, by my observation.  It was a "place-holder" of sorts.  I looked at that body for hours, off and on again, to see how it might be spiffed-up and made more distinctive to look at.  My orientation was that many of the great-looking cars of the '50s were just basic shapes, with chrome trim and two-tone colors which really made them look sharp.  Take the Buick grille, any VentiPorts, and the tri-shield away, and the Lucerne could have been pretty much anything, unfortunately.  Remembering one of the comments at the 75th Anniversary banquet in Flint . . . "You could tell a Buick two blocks away".  That sort of visual brand identity went away sometime in the 1980s.  Well before the "What car is that" Oldsmobile Intrigue came to be.

 

The marketing people always like to frame their "new" way to do things as "New, Different, and Better".  Got to keep the customer interested!  So they change something that probably shouldn't have been changed, but rather expanded and refined instead.  On the other hand, some "static" orientations can be bad for the product.  So there would need to be some newness along with some stable product orientations for best results.

 

Oldsmobile had a very recognizable "Rocket" logo.  Everybody knew what it was and what it was applied to.  But as the upcoming Aurora and other cars were on the drawing board.  Cars which would be very different from prior Oldsmobiles.  There seemed to be a need for a new logo to reflect the "newness" of these cars, after the disasterous "Not Your Father's Oldsmobile" ad campaign!  So they got a new logo that nobody knew what it was.  Didn't recognize it.  The cars could have have  been a Mazda for all anybody knew!  And THEN . . . the ONLY place the Intrigue name was was on the rh backup light lens!  Cast into it with no accent paint, just clear plastic!  Doomed to failure from the start, as if "by design" . . . although the car got very good reviews from the likes of Road & Track.  "Intrigued" by what that car is?  AND this was all during the "brand management" phase of GM's life, when they lost market share, made a little money with fewer products at about 20% market share (which Wall Street loved), but when market share went down a few more percentage points, then the financial people got scared.  Few other "properties" to sell-off to maintain dividends . . . and we know what happened later on.

 

Olds could have been saved and revitalized by changing the focus of it competing against Lexus and Infinity and looking more toward the Jag S-Type and Chrysler LHS instead.  Not very much additional investment as much of what might be changed would have cost pretty much the same as what it replaced.  BUT, by that time, there was no "will" inside GM to do that as they even ran off some loyal Olds customers with "no bench seat" in the Aurora, so the loyal Olds customers kept their trusty Delta 88s a few more years.

 

We tend to consider "Buick" to be a USA brand with the bulk of them being sold in the USA.  Yet the Chinese have a real affection for Buicks, as Buick was GM's "export" brand into China ages ago.  And more Buicks are still sold in China than in the USA, significantly so.  It was THIS that kept Buick alive, not that Buick was the founding brand of GM.

 

The fact that Pontiac was the choice of many to keep alive should have been a red flag of sorts for Buick marketing.  The other side of the deal is that all of the last Pontiacs didn't really have a "dual" product in GM-NA.  Buick was still considered a "grandparent car", as Pontiac was still perceived to be a more youthful brand, even after the Aztec.  Therefore, it was less "Invasive" to then-current GM operations to delete Pontiac and to keep Buick.  The statement that GM lost money on every Oldsmobile is suspect, as the Intrigue was built on the same line as the Pontiac Grand Prix.  After the Riviera went away, there was no companion product for the Aurora, although the Olds Alero was a Pontiac GrandAM under the skin.  The Olds Bravada became the Buick Rainier, to fill those gaps on the "TrailBlazer" assembly line.

 

I know that each product has a "life of the tooling" that dictates and is planned for in each new vehicle to be built.  I have observed that advertising can be diminished ("blah" sales brochures, too!) if the product will be ending and nor up for renewal.  This was highly evident in the final years of "Camaro and Firebird", until the groundswell of support for the Camaro happened.  Suddenly, Chevrolet started paying attention to what "the customers and enthusiasts" were saying, as Ford had done when it was leaked that the "next Mustang" was going to be on a Japanese platform (as it was too late to stop that vehicle from its new plant and production, it became the Ford Probe) and the Mustang spent several more years on the Fox platform with new "Mustang" styling, power, and excitement.  

 

The KEY Thing is to keep the product people aimed in the "right direction".  Those at Buick?  There's promise, but after the flat end of the Avenir and the "just after than" Buick cope on the Corvette platform, I don't know if THEY really know what they need to do.  At this time, they are riding the wave of SUV-type vehicles, it seems, which is not that bad of a place to be.  They might point to the very small percentage of "sedan" sales as a reason to not do any different sedans, but that small percentage of sedans might also be due to the fact that the current products aren't nearly as good in the USA and/or Buick orientations as they probably should be?

 

I'm not sure that GM has really "found its way", other than for Chevrolet, in general.  Many GMC SUVs seem to be emulating what some Oldsmobiles were in the past, by observation.  Buick hasn't really mounted a decent "charge" against Lexus in many years.  Cadillac?  "Audi-llac"?  GM can do the products, just getting the dang things sold!

 

NTX5467

 

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I would submit that one of the reasons for Pontiac's demise in sales is that the division/corp changed the names of the models at least I think five times in about 25 years.  As an example they went from a Pontiac Grand Am to a G6 and people walked away.

 

Here is a starter list of all of the names more recently and I am not sure it has all of them.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Pontiac_vehicles

 

And that was just Pontiac.  Remember when it appeared that every Oldsmobile had the name Cutlass attached to it?  And the examples can keep going on.  Total confusion on the sales floor.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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I was on business travel last week and somehow managed to receive a Chevy Impala with 300 miles on the clock from Avis.  I was pretty excited, as everything I had read said that these were likely the best full-size American car available today.  Well, that thing must have shut itself off and restarted at least 20 times between the airport and my hotel.  Hmmmmm, I guess it does that so that my next door neighbor can hit the remote start on his 2016 Silverado and let it idle in his driveway for 15 minutes every morning.  We call this 'progress'?  Change for the sake of change does not signify vitality -- rather, it may simply be the last gasp...

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4 hours ago, Barney Eaton said:

if you didn't have an old Buick,  would you buy a new Buick?

 

yes!

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8 hours ago, EmTee said:

I was on business travel last week and somehow managed to receive a Chevy Impala with 300 miles on the clock from Avis.  I was pretty excited, as everything I had read said that these were likely the best full-size American car available today.  Well, that thing must have shut itself off and restarted at least 20 times between the airport and my hotel.  Hmmmmm, I guess it does that so that my next door neighbor can hit the remote start on his 2016 Silverado and let it idle in his driveway for 15 minutes every morning.  We call this 'progress'?  Change for the sake of change does not signify vitality -- rather, it may simply be the last gasp...

 

One of the reasons for push button starts is because of the number of persons that put 5 POUNDS of stuff on their key rings and wear out the lock cylinder.  That is part of the reason for the GM recall of the ignition locks cylinders. Especially younger women.   I know because when I was a rep, I saw a lot of customer cars with that much stuff on the "key ring".

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)

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1 hour ago, Larry Schramm said:

That is part of the reason for the GM recall of the ignition locks cylinders.

 

Some say the lowest common denominator is a factor.

 

^^^^

comment for Bemon.

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Does anyone else find the new cars are less intuitive to drive?  I could get in most older cars and in a few seconds know what worked what.  Had a loaners DTS and a loaner MDX and  Loaner X3 recently hated them all.  Was happy to get the radio on and the heater to work.  The automatic speed cruise control makes me crazy.  For me there is a sweet spot that the cars are modern enough, ABS, Bluetooth, traction control but not all the automatic crap. I also hate the fact that doing your own oil changes is about as much as you can do without all kinds of special tools and equipment.  We've moved to electrical gremlins from mechanical ones.

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1 hour ago, 60FlatTop said:

 

Some say the lowest common denominator is a factor.

 

^^^^

comment for Bemon.

 

Genetic promotion vs/ competency - skill - experience based promotion.

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11 hours ago, NTX5467 said:

I respectfully submit that many of the "marketing" orientations are advocated by people who have LITTLE real knowledge of effectively marking products in a compelling manner.  Remember when Cadillac went from "names" to "letters of the names"?  Eldorado Touring Coupe became the Cadillac ETC.  Somebody obviously signed-off on that!  DTS would have been "DeVille Touring Sedan".  Mercedes, BMW, and others have used alpha-numeric names as model designations for ages, BUT the progression of letters and numbers actually mean something of which model it is, which engine size, and "FI" or "Carb".  So it all makes some sense, that way, IF you care to understand it.  Kind of bland, in some cases.

 

The USA brands typically used names for their vehicles.  Names which alluded to vehicular properties . . . grace, elegance, luxury, toughness, speed, power, or some desirable geographic location.  Going far beyond "Special", "Deluxe", or "Custom".  If you cared, it could be a nice geography lesson!  And then there were the model designations which meant "hardtop", too.  And with all of the theatrics in the car commercials, those names had real capabilities for sounding spectacular AND aspirational.  A way of making them seem "exciting" and "something a customer would want to go see in person".  In that orientation, can you imagine some alpha-numeric designation generating that same level of excitement?  Just the names "Buick", "Chevrolet", "Pontiac", "Oldsmobile", and "Cadillac" had those theatrical qualities by themselves.

 

I suspect that one reason Buick sedans have not sold well is the price point they are at.  That's MY suspicion.  The high-selling Encore is a very nice vehicle at a good price point for what it is.  If it were not an SUV-type, it would be a tiny sedan that couldn't carry very much at all.  The Envision is a little larger and has an instrument panel design that is unlike other GM vehicles, which is GOOD!  The current Lacrosse is a very nice car, but looked bloated to me.  It looks better in some colors than others.

 

The "Lucerne" came about due to a request by the dealers that they wanted a name that was not the same as they'd had before.  A new model name that would draw people into the Buick showrooms to see "a new Buick", rather than a name they were familiar with.  Unfortunately, as good as the Lucerne might have been, it was as unremarkable as the name it was given, by my observation.  It was a "place-holder" of sorts.  I looked at that body for hours, off and on again, to see how it might be spiffed-up and made more distinctive to look at.  My orientation was that many of the great-looking cars of the '50s were just basic shapes, with chrome trim and two-tone colors which really made them look sharp.  Take the Buick grille, any VentiPorts, and the tri-shield away, and the Lucerne could have been pretty much anything, unfortunately.  Remembering one of the comments at the 75th Anniversary banquet in Flint . . . "You could tell a Buick two blocks away".  That sort of visual brand identity went away sometime in the 1980s.  Well before the "What car is that" Oldsmobile Intrigue came to be.

 

The marketing people always like to frame their "new" way to do things as "New, Different, and Better".  Got to keep the customer interested!  So they change something that probably shouldn't have been changed, but rather expanded and refined instead.  On the other hand, some "static" orientations can be bad for the product.  So there would need to be some newness along with some stable product orientations for best results.

 

Oldsmobile had a very recognizable "Rocket" logo.  Everybody knew what it was and what it was applied to.  But as the upcoming Aurora and other cars were on the drawing board.  Cars which would be very different from prior Oldsmobiles.  There seemed to be a need for a new logo to reflect the "newness" of these cars, after the disasterous "Not Your Father's Oldsmobile" ad campaign!  So they got a new logo that nobody knew what it was.  Didn't recognize it.  The cars could have have  been a Mazda for all anybody knew!  And THEN . . . the ONLY place the Intrigue name was was on the rh backup light lens!  Cast into it with no accent paint, just clear plastic!  Doomed to failure from the start, as if "by design" . . . although the car got very good reviews from the likes of Road & Track.  "Intrigued" by what that car is?  AND this was all during the "brand management" phase of GM's life, when they lost market share, made a little money with fewer products at about 20% market share (which Wall Street loved), but when market share went down a few more percentage points, then the financial people got scared.  Few other "properties" to sell-off to maintain dividends . . . and we know what happened later on.

 

Olds could have been saved and revitalized by changing the focus of it competing against Lexus and Infinity and looking more toward the Jag S-Type and Chrysler LHS instead.  Not very much additional investment as much of what might be changed would have cost pretty much the same as what it replaced.  BUT, by that time, there was no "will" inside GM to do that as they even ran off some loyal Olds customers with "no bench seat" in the Aurora, so the loyal Olds customers kept their trusty Delta 88s a few more years.

 

We tend to consider "Buick" to be a USA brand with the bulk of them being sold in the USA.  Yet the Chinese have a real affection for Buicks, as Buick was GM's "export" brand into China ages ago.  And more Buicks are still sold in China than in the USA, significantly so.  It was THIS that kept Buick alive, not that Buick was the founding brand of GM.

 

The fact that Pontiac was the choice of many to keep alive should have been a red flag of sorts for Buick marketing.  The other side of the deal is that all of the last Pontiacs didn't really have a "dual" product in GM-NA.  Buick was still considered a "grandparent car", as Pontiac was still perceived to be a more youthful brand, even after the Aztec.  Therefore, it was less "Invasive" to then-current GM operations to delete Pontiac and to keep Buick.  The statement that GM lost money on every Oldsmobile is suspect, as the Intrigue was built on the same line as the Pontiac Grand Prix.  After the Riviera went away, there was no companion product for the Aurora, although the Olds Alero was a Pontiac GrandAM under the skin.  The Olds Bravada became the Buick Rainier, to fill those gaps on the "TrailBlazer" assembly line.

 

I know that each product has a "life of the tooling" that dictates and is planned for in each new vehicle to be built.  I have observed that advertising can be diminished ("blah" sales brochures, too!) if the product will be ending and nor up for renewal.  This was highly evident in the final years of "Camaro and Firebird", until the groundswell of support for the Camaro happened.  Suddenly, Chevrolet started paying attention to what "the customers and enthusiasts" were saying, as Ford had done when it was leaked that the "next Mustang" was going to be on a Japanese platform (as it was too late to stop that vehicle from its new plant and production, it became the Ford Probe) and the Mustang spent several more years on the Fox platform with new "Mustang" styling, power, and excitement.  

 

The KEY Thing is to keep the product people aimed in the "right direction".  Those at Buick?  There's promise, but after the flat end of the Avenir and the "just after than" Buick cope on the Corvette platform, I don't know if THEY really know what they need to do.  At this time, they are riding the wave of SUV-type vehicles, it seems, which is not that bad of a place to be.  They might point to the very small percentage of "sedan" sales as a reason to not do any different sedans, but that small percentage of sedans might also be due to the fact that the current products aren't nearly as good in the USA and/or Buick orientations as they probably should be?

 

I'm not sure that GM has really "found its way", other than for Chevrolet, in general.  Many GMC SUVs seem to be emulating what some Oldsmobiles were in the past, by observation.  Buick hasn't really mounted a decent "charge" against Lexus in many years.  Cadillac?  "Audi-llac"?  GM can do the products, just getting the dang things sold!

 

NTX5467

Boy, howdy! You hit the nail on they head. Beautifully articulated. First, I'll readily admit I'm like Sgt. Schultz on the old TV show "Hogan's Heroes,"  in that "I know nothing" about auto mechanics, but for some dumb inexplicable reason, I have always loved classic cars, especially Buicks. I guess because I grew up in early Sixties hearing "grown folks" say, "If you drove a Buick you were somebody." I had a late uncle who was a doctor and made house-calls and he drove a Buick. The local bank president drove a Buick, along with several other prominent businessmen in the small community where I lived. I was well schooled in the Buick mystic.  And, yes, you could tell what brand a car was from a mile away, especially depending on the grille work.  

 

Not long ago while sitting behind a Mercedes at a red-light did it dawn on me that car models had gone from using specific names to alpha-numeric identifications. Once I became cognizant of that change, I marveled at just how many car manufacturers have done away giving models names in favor alphanumeric designations. I don't know, saying a person owns an "M6" BMW--which I just saw in traffic two days ago--doesn't have the same ring as saying he/she owns a Riviera, LaSabre, or a Century. 

 

In my own extremely limited view, cars now look so similar as to be indistinguishable from one another, which is a shame in my humble opinion. My late father told he remembered the first time he ever saw a Packard. He said you just knew it was a Packard because of it's look (design). 

 

Thanks again for your very insightful article. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it and appreciated the time and effort it took to compose.

Kind regards,

Garrett Meadows

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20 hours ago, Pete Phillips said:

IF they aren't proud enough of their product to put the name on it, then, well...I could go on, but I won't.

This has to rank right up there with some of the stupidest decisions and moves Buick has ever made. The elimination of the LeSabre name and line of cars springs to mind--right when LeSabre had all sorts of awards and quality prizes, a sterling reputation and a loyal product following, and they eliminated it from the lineup in the early 2000s. Same type of bone-headed thinking behind this latest move...

 

Pete Phillips, BCA #7338

 

I agree completely, Pete.  

 

One of the auto industry analysts that I read weekly is Peter DeLorenzo, whose columns are posted at autoextremist.com.  DeLorenzo's father was one of Harlow Curtice's closest advisors, and he has a background in the advertising industry.  He is consistently critical of GM's failure to invest in the company's marketing function.  GM's refusal to hire a Chief Marketing Officer is viewed as a glaring omission by company management.

 

Product aside, I often think that the folks who have been entrusted with the Buick brand have absolutely no grasp of Buick's place in the market.  We know Buick to have a proud heritage, and I could only shake my head at the insulting "That's not a Buick" commercials of the recent past.  Is that how the marketing people think they can burnish Buick's brand image?  Buick deserves far better than it receives from GM's leadership.

Edited by Centurion (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, skateboardgumby said:

The "Lucerne" came about due to a request by the dealers that they wanted a name that was not the same as they'd had before.  A new model name that would draw people into the Buick showrooms to see "a new Buick", rather than a name they were familiar with.

 

And this sense of familiarity.

Lucuene750.JPG.1bdd730973704e52c9d1df21aa25ea4c.JPG

 

A couple of weeks ago I was looking at this exact comparison. I knew if I whistled a happy tune no one would suspect the wrong wheels were driving, but I went RWD instead.

And my Wife is a little tired of riding while she listens to me say "Now, why can't this be a Buick or a Cadillac." I don't want my Son's Buick.

Bernie

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8 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

I don't want my Son's Buick.

 

What about your father's Oldsmobile?  :huh:

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