Recommended Posts

Interesting car I would loved to have had some years back. But now? I can't consider anything that needs that much work done (either restoration or proper preservation). 

And, considering that in recent years I have watched not one, but two, late '20s Packard sedans in similar original condition (running and driveable) eventually sell for under $10,000 each? Also a few mid '20s Cadillacs in nicer original condition that couldn't sell for around $20,000? The market just doesn't say those rough sedans are worth big bucks. I think it is sad. I love the sedans of that era, and like them in preserved as original condition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

Interesting car I would loved to have had some years back. But now? I can't consider anything that needs that much work done (either restoration or proper preservation). 

And, considering that in recent years I have watched not one, but two, late '20s Packard sedans in similar original condition (running and driveable) eventually sell for under $10,000 each? Also a few mid '20s Cadillacs in nicer original condition that couldn't sell for around $20,000? The market just doesn't say those rough sedans are worth big bucks. I think it is sad. I love the sedans of that era, and like them in preserved as original condition.

 

I paid less than the asking price for a 22 Cad 5 passenger coupe, which is a very practical rally car because it has a back seat and lockable storage 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Mark Wetherbee said:

... It’s a great start but on the pricey side for a big sedan IMHO.

 

I agree that the price is too high.

It's an interesting car, certainly, but it is a junior model,

and it needs "TLC."  "Tender loving care" means more like

thousands of dollars of work.

 

Within the last year there was a restored late 1920's

Locomobile sedan for sale with an asking price in the low $40,000's.

If that nice Locomobile would be worth somewhere in the $30's,

I think that this rough wouldn't even come close in value.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One more case where the owner equates rarity with value?

 

These are the types of cars I loved to see at car shows in the 1970's and even now have a great respect for, but the market has changed wildly since those times. The earlier sedans have taken the hardest hit with the exception of true Classic custom bodied automobiles and the more beautifully styled cars of the era (as opposed to the "big box" cars). Today there is more interest in the 1970's cars I rode to those shows in that the cars we were going to see at the time.

 

I'm pretty sure Mike is being funny about making an offer for 10k, but if that car needs a lot of wood work done you would be paying too much even at that. As a reference there is also a 31 LaSalle on eBay with bad wood, at least it would be full classic once you put a ton of money into it's salvation.

 

I know for a fact that the missing radiator emblem will cost you at least a few hundred dollars and with any "rare" car most parts are even worse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Too bad it´s on craigslist, but maybe it will help sell it. In thirty years, there won´t be any more cars like this popping up, and all there´ll be are post-World War Two Chevrolets and Fords. In my opinion, it has a lot more intrinsic value than all the Chevelles and Mustangs you can line up. They are asking a lot, but that´s just car-show-itis coming through a little. They do say best offer, it runs, and seems to be very complete. Looking at the Locomobile Society site, there are a whole 21 staight-8 Locomobiles of any type surviving. I´ve only seen one Locomobile before. It was a 1926 and nowhere near this big...possibly a Junior Six.

 

I wish they would make up their minds whether it´s a 1925, 1926, or 1929; and list it as a Locomobile, not Durant. The sellers may not be up on the make.

 

After viewing the Standard Catalog, it looks like it may have a 124¨ wheelbase, a 66 h.p. OHV engine, and be a 1926 Junior Eight Brougham costing $2,285 new in Bridgeport, CT. It matches a factory illustration on page 896.

 

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What you need to know is who this seller is and where he got it. Probably got it cheap from an estate sale and should be asking no more than 10% above what he paid for it. I get the sense the seller is a flipper.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of those Packards I mentioned. Made me want to cry. It had belonged to a friend of mine for about thirty or more years. He had several '20s Packards in very original condition and liked them very much. And he drove some of them quite a lot on club tours. He passed away about fifteen years ago, and most of his cars went scattering about. Some I knew where, most I didn't. About ten to twelve years after he had passed, this one showed up again. I don't know where it had been, but it was just about how it had been years earlier, and sold again (price not disclosed). Then it started making the rounds, "For Sale" websites all over the net.  Clearly, it had been acquired by someone looking to make a few dollars. I do not know what they paid for it, and to be totally blunt about it, I hope they lost their shirt. It began being offered at about $25,000, with a lot of fancy talk about how incredible and rare it was, and "you will never find a better one!" (Frankly, it wasn't THAT nice.). The usual quick buck gold-digger type of stuff. After awhile, it ended up on ebay. "Reserve not met" for about a year, as the reserve was dropped lower and lower. It was on and off, then on again ebay for about a year. Eventually, they put it up at No Reserve. The last time I saw it listed? The final ebay listing said "sold" for slightly under $10,000. I really wish I could have bid on it, and had a way to actually pay for it. I would have loved to have that car for that price.

 

I do not mind people making some money on cars like that. But I hate to see them pushed for three times their real worth with glowing descriptions playing loose with the facts. I fear that whoever bought it initially from my friend's estate probably lost money on it. That largely due the the economy and the markets for these wonderful cars isn't as good as it used to be. Someone else wanted to double their money on an investment they not only did not care about? But also did not understand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched with more interest than was warranted as this car was bid to $15590 on eBay and did not meet its reserve. I really think the seller should have taken that bid, but not being mine I have no say in the matter.

 

An interesting car but I still agree with most of the opinions above. 

 

Good of luck to the seller...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being a Junior 8 it must be earlier than 1929. A pity that the pic of the id plate is blurred.  Depending on the year the engine is less than 200 cid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rare and interesting does not translate into big dollars. Neat car.......with a bit of luck it will make it into a garage to preserve what is left of the factory finishes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It appears the incomplete and rusty parts car ad has a mistake in it.....it says 8500, I’m sure they meant $85.00  

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't help but say it; I think Locomobiles, even later model juniors, are just grand automobiles!   

I hope this one finds a good home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now THAT once beautiful old shell is a perfect Rat candidate ! Unlike the sad travesty of complete , solid , original , easily restorable open high period Full Classics* ,  being rodded , parts scattered to the vultures , this one , this dead Packard is the kind of carcass and bones which should get your generic 350/350  , and other modern components. Let it's angular form be seen cruising again thanks to the metal master's talented touch ! And : Long Live the Loco' !    - CC 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmmm?

The stickers in the rear window of the Locomobile would make me a little suspect of recent owners.

00j0j_7AmtzbwRHiO_1200x900.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/19/2018 at 4:18 PM, nzcarnerd said:

Being a Junior 8 it must be earlier than 1929. A pity that the pic of the id plate is blurred.  Depending on the year the engine is less than 200 cid.

I read on the AACA Locomobile Forum that this is a 1925 Locomobile.

 

NZ, I always enjoy reading your comments on antique cars and appreciate your grasp of the hundreds of makes and models out there. Could that sub-200 Cu. In. be true for the Locomobile Junior 8? I couldn't find it's displacement anywhere, but with 3 times the horsepower of a Ford and a sticker price north of $2,200 for this 124" w.b. Brougham Eight, I would have thought their OHV straight-8 to be in the 240-280 cubic inch range.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, jeff_a said:

I read on the AACA Locomobile Forum that this is a 1925 Locomobile.

 

NZ, I always enjoy reading your comments on antique cars and appreciate your grasp of the hundreds of makes and models out there. Could that sub-200 Cu. In. be true for the Locomobile Junior 8? I couldn't find it's displacement anywhere, but with 3 times the horsepower of a Ford and a sticker price north of $2,200 for this 1_ _" w.b. Brougham Eight I would have thought their OHV straight-8 to be in the 240-280 cubic inch range.

 

According to the list in my copy of The Specification Book for US cars, which I bought in the US in 1978, the overhead valve 1925 Locomobile Junior 8 has a bore and stroke of 2 13/16" x 4" for 181 cid - but that is incorrect as it calculates out to 198.8 cid. There was also a Junior 6 as well - but that was a side valve Continental 7U.

For 1926  the bore and stroke measurements are the same and the correct figure of 198.8 cid is given.

The same ohv engine was used in the 1927 Model 6-66.

From there on the lower price cars used a mix of side valve Lycoming and Continental engines.

From what I know of Locomobile they didn't make a lot of cars in those later years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now