Restorer32

You know you've been playing with old cars a long time when...

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Jeff

 

 

Right on target..thanks for bringing a smile .

 

As I remember, my dad's  tire shop in West York had a much smaller collection of parts, but a lot of old tubes and valves.

 

Phil

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Back when you could actually sell junk tubes for money Dad would sent a trailer load to Akron once a year.  I remember them being worth .05/lb delivered to Goodrich in Akron.  My job was to cut out the brass valve stems. When we had a barrel full we would burn the rubber off them and sell the brass for scrap.

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...when 1992 vehicles are accepted into the AACA. I see car's of this vintage parked in every "assisted living" facility in town. 

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[You know you've been playing with old cars a long time when...]

 

The mechanic who I use has been in the trade since he was a kid and worked at his Uncle's gas station / shop. Uncle Frank retired and sold the business to his nephew with all the contents. When I brought the Special over to have the brakes bleed and set up he mentioned he had an adaptor they used to screw into the master cylinder allowing a pressurised tank of brake fluid to assist for a one man bleeding operation.

With a bit of scrounging around he produced it and with a quick touch on a wire wheel to clean the threads, away he went bleeding the system.

He remembered using it on the local paper delivery Dodge Trucks since Uncle Frank had the maintenance contract back then.

Also went there recently to see if he had the fat long stem valves for my rims and came up with five new in a shelf.

Not many business around here can do this for you today.

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My hardware collection is smaller but very similar. I used to keep all the leftover fasteners from cars I stripped and I never throw out any good nut, bolt, screw or washer, not to mention cage nuts, body shims, etc. Most are in about 6 old two-pound coffee cans plus two or three of those plastic pull-out drawer units. I also inherited all my Dad's old fasteners (and tools). For the longest time the only organization of this mess was a separate can for metric stuff but about four years ago I finally separated all the coffee can contents and labeled them so I no longer have to dump out three cans full and sift through to find what I need....

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I realized I had to many left over car parts around the barn when my two grandsons age 10 & 11 last spring. When asked if it was ok and if I would  help them put together a car from the extra parts I had around. True story and by son just stood there and smiled.

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)
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a) am a Scot

b ) "You know you've been playing with old cars a long time when..."  every time you clean out the garage it's like Christmas, last time I found a transmission.

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2 hours ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

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The OP was talking about indications that you have been in this hobby for a long time.  Your example, while funny, isn't true.  Your illustration is what can happen overnight.

 

 

 

Comment made in keeping with your humor, which I appreciate.

Edited by kgreen (see edit history)
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DEI

 

I plan to build something like this to supply fluid to my 1932 Desoto..actually a long pipe with a threaded end will suffice during the procedure.

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I have a collection of hardware like that but sorted into both prewar and post war tubs. The modern stuff is in #10 cans.  About every 5 years or so I take it all outside and blow the dust out.

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2 hours ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

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Very true!!! Even being in this Antique car forum is costing me money. Last week I bought a 1912 Ford T touring that a fellow blogger posted in the topic (OK You Old Timers! What were Project Cars like in 1975?  and I did thank him and the wife wants to talk to him also.

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4 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

Your misc nut and bolt bin looks like this...and this...and this.

nuts and bolts 2.jpg

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This is the stuff my nightmares are filled with. Bins and bins of new parts also. Mostly gone now thanks to @JACK M‘s help finding scrappers and the shop sale.

 

Looks like I get to clear out my Oregon home next, that I have lived in since 1995. Much less accumulation in the garage, although my ex did leave quite a collection of nuts and bolts and assorted stuff from his construction business. 🤦‍♀️  

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I gave up on lightweight plastic containers like the split one in your post. I now use 20 Litre oil buckets. At work we used a dozen or more a month and most just ended up in the trash. So I wash one out every now and then and take it home. They last for at least 10 years or more before splitting. And the lids snap back on to keep the dust out

 

Greg in Canada

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You know you've been playing with old cars a long time when the car/truck/ute you bought new to bring home parts for your latest project is itself now a 40 year old collector car.It qualified for historic vehicle plates while I was still working at the place I bought it.I knew then that it was time to retire ! Photo shows my brand new '78 GMC Caballero.

Slides from carousels 3 002.JPG

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The garage my Dad owns was his dads before him (started late 20, early 30s) and about 20 yrs ago my Dad gave me a box full of nuts & bolts all for Model T's from when my Grandfather ran the Garage. It sure has come in handy as I have 5 Model T's now, and I still have lots of nuts and bolts and other misc parts left over. You can go in the old stock room and there are all kids of hidden gyms from the 40s, 50s and 60s. We came across a brass windshield frame for an 10/11 Model T about 10 yrs ago, Dad who had ran the  body shop since the early 70s never even knew it was there. It was something he figures my grandfather stashed away in the 30s.

 

Jeff  

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Heck I can't even remember what I stashed thutty yar ago.

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What's strange is I can go thru those bins and identify most of the obscure parts. Wheel bolts from an '08 Pullman, high nuts from a '17 Bell,  broken accelerator rod from a Packard...ahhhh...memories.

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5 hours ago, padgett said:

every time you clean out the garage it's like Christmas, last time I found a transmission.

 

I resemble that remark... :lol:

IMG_2706.thumb.JPG.a648f88606133933e569e38c3d4c9bdb.JPG

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You know you've been playing with old cars a long time when...

When you were the youngest guy in the local club when you joined 45 years ago, and you still are!

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You know you've been playing with old cars a long time when...

 

...photos of AACA tours you attended as a child show "modern transportation cars" in the background...the newest of which have been eligible for display at Hershey for about 35 years now! That's my dad, sitting on the milk crate. I was probably standing next to my Mom while she took the photo. 

 

scan0058.jpg

Edited by lump (see edit history)
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