Restorer32

You know you've been playing with old cars a long time when...

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3 hours ago, trimacar said:

Here's how I find the part I need..........turn up the volume and see if you recognize the sound...

February 2018 020.MOV

 

AH! In my home growing up, it was the dreaded dishpan. Dad would need a nut, or bolt, or something and we'd be sent to the "dreaded dishpan" to search just like your movie illustrates! The experience has had me more than once make a trip to the hardware store only to find what I needed in my own junk box later -- just didn't want to search!

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The old cars that you now have weren't old when you got them, just everyday drivers.  And all of their contemporaries seem to have vanished, making yours a rarity in your area.

 

Common service practices that you learned back in the day are now incredible, nearly fictional, stories when told to younger service techs.  Think relining brake shoes, polarizing generators, rebushing distributors, rebuilding fuel pumps, reaming kingpins, rodding out radiators, adjusting voltage regulators, etc.

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I hate to say it but the hobby has totally changed around. At one time when I got into this hobby back in the 70s it was young guys driving antique cars. Now today it is antique guys driving younger cars.

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That's right!  When we started touring, there were plenty of pre WWII cars, now many guys bring the newest car allowed.    In the beginning the cars were all older than the drivers.  Now, almost all the drivers are older than their cars. 

Edited by Paul Dobbin (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, Paul Dobbin said:

....now many guys bring the newest car allowed. 

Agreed, it's difficult for me to apply any of the terms like classic, vintage, antique, etc. to any car from the 80's or 90's with plastic bumpers.

I hold fast to the idea that if it is new enough for me to have bought since I was old enough to drive, it probably shouldn't qualify. :lol:

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I was helping at an event and overheard a member saying he was going to sell his old car and buy another one. But the next one had to have an air con and power windows.

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You know you've been playing with old cars a long time when....you remember going through Harrah's FULL collection when you were 15 years old in 1967....

 

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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I realize how long it's been when I talk about the "common" cars around town when I was young that folks these days have no idea what I mean.  And, the folks that ask me who made my Studebaker and Austin... Oh well, I don't recognize the jelly beans that most folks drive today, so I guess we're even.

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I think the realization that I'm a modern day dinosaur comes for me regularly when I go into my local parts store and ask the young girl at the counter for valve cover gaskets/ fuel pump/ valve seals/ intake set/ or any number of other (formerly) common items for a small block Chevrolet, and she gets that "deer in the headlights" look while nervously glancing back and forth from me to her computer screen and says "A small what?" :(

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...so many left over bolts, parts, carcasses of derelict stuff left over from rescuing the "good Stuff"   that I had to have an auction to down size. 

......Ahhhh, the days of putting a coil, points, condenser and charging the magnet on a Magneto.

.....Carburetors were made of brass and many had cork floats.

.....Most of my fondest friends, those I learned from, and customers are no longer with us. Dandy Dave!   

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)

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Just now, Dandy Dave said:

...so many left over bolts,

Dandy Dave!   

   Dave, we call those optional parts, because there are always leftover parts after any repair.

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3 hours ago, GregLaR said:

Agreed, it's difficult for me to apply any of the terms like classic, vintage, antique, etc. to any car from the 80's or 90's with plastic bumpers.

I hold fast to the idea that if it is new enough for me to have bought since I was old enough to drive, it probably shouldn't qualify. :lol:

I have a hard time calling a car antique that has any more electrification than a magneto.

 

Greg in Canada

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....when you look in a book from 1968 that shows yourself as a 7 or 8 year old (photo taken about 1959...book by Wherry: Automobiles of the World) watching old cars at Greenfield Village. I am on the far right standing next to my brother. We are wearing suspenders which I may have to start wearing again....

1.jpg

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You know you've been playing with old cars a long time when?  The white wall tires you bought for your project, have to be replaced due to age, and have never turned a mile. (has not happened to me, but I have seen that one) 

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3 hours ago, 1912Staver said:

Agreed, it's difficult for me to apply any of the terms like classic, vintage, antique, etc. to any car from the 80's or 90's with plastic bumpers

 

Errr, my '70 has a non-ferrous bumper.

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You know more people that have passed on than you meet at Hershey every year. Their memory is why you continue to attend the Swap Meet. Bob 

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14 minutes ago, Restorer32 said:

If you remember when red oxide primer was $11/gallon and black lacquer was $22/gallon.

Or have a very good paint job done at a restoration shop for under $5,000.

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8 minutes ago, Joe in Canada said:

Or have a very good paint job done at a restoration shop for under $5,000.

My 1931 Chevrolet was, in 1966, 15 coats of "hand rubbed" lacquer, complete paint job cost $200.  Spray on 3 coats, sand off 2 coats, repeat 5 times.  I know, because I had a friend at the time who did the painting, and I did the sanding along with him.  No paint booth, that was an advantage of lacquer, it dried so quickly nothing stuck to it.  Oh, and I was 15 years old, restoring my first car at my father's expense.  We ended up with a total of $550 in the car, including engine work, upholstery, paint...no chrome, that was an extravagance reserved for other people, so the best used chrome was put on car....note that front bumper is painted, and back then, no one cared....by the way, in the frame picture, those are new old stock fenders, you could find stuff like that in the 60's, when the car was only 30 years old....

scan0005.jpg

scan0002.jpg

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You watched the door open on the side of the Passport truck and there it was, the World Record setting Most Expensive Car Sold at Auction at $65,000!

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