nzcarnerd

Mystery sedan and roadster.

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Another one from the HAMB. Roadster - maybe Nash? The sedan - maybe 1930 Studebaker?  Original pic first.

Hamb p 5083 b.jpg

Hamb p 5083 b - Copy (2).jpg

Hamb p 5083 b - Copy (3).jpg

Hamb p 5083 b - Copy (4).jpg

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Thinking Convertible Coupe rather than Roadster, different bumperettes may be a clue to year/make/model. Bumperette's on original photo remind me of 1929 Willy's Knight, i.e. 2 painted pipes.

Edited by Gunsmoke (see edit history)

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4 minutes ago, Gunsmoke said:

Thinking Convertible Coupe rather than Roadster, different bumperettes may be a clue to year/make/model.

Yes, may be a cabriolet/convertible coupe. Here is a Special Six cabriolet with those bumpers....

 

4 minutes ago, Gunsmoke said:

 

 

1926 Nash Special Six.jpg

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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I didn't think Stude offered wood wheels after 26. Are these photos of American built cars, or are they Australian?

 

Frank

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Wood wheels were standard on Studebaker thru 1928, 1929-30 wire wheels became standard with wood wheels optional.

Not an Australian picture, steering wheel is on the left.

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2 hours ago, Layden B said:

Wood wheels were standard on Studebaker thru 1928, 1929-30 wire wheels became standard with wood wheels optional.

Not an Australian picture, steering wheel is on the left.

 

In the 1929-31 era wire wheels were only standard on the higher specification Royal and State models, the lower prices models had woods as standard.

 

If it was in a right hand drive country the cars would be parked at the opposite angle to the street.

 

This is Eketahuna, in the Wairarapa district, north of Wellington, New Zealand, in the late 1940s. New cars were in very short supply so most people drove their pre war models. Even today the average age of the NZ car fleet is 14 years, but that is slowly decreasing as new car sales have been very strong in the last few years.

 

Eketahuna, Wairarapa, ca 26 May 1978 (1024x576).jpg

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On 20/02/2018 at 12:45 PM, nzcarnerd said:

Even today the average age of the NZ car fleet is 14 years, but that is slowly decreasing as new car sales have been very strong in the last few years.

 

Maybe not quite. This graph is from the latest www.transport.govt.nz report on vehicle fleet statistics. The increasing age is mainly because of the increasing average age of the used imported vehicles (mainly from Japan). There is a low rate of scrappage.

http://www.transport.govt.nz/assets/Uploads/Research/Documents/Fleet-reports/Quarterly-Fleet-Report-2017Q3-web.pdf

 

image.thumb.png.7b7bb4c3312e924ec2c148f7ccdde627.png

 

I notice a few mud-wall tires on those '40s vehicles but not many white walls! Probably not so many sealed roads in that area.

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5 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

Maybe not quite. This graph is from the latest www.transport.govt.nz report on vehicle fleet statistics. The increasing age is mainly because of the increasing average age of the used imported vehicles (mainly from Japan). There is a low rate of scrappage.

http://www.transport.govt.nz/assets/Uploads/Research/Documents/Fleet-reports/Quarterly-Fleet-Report-2017Q3-web.pdf

 

image.thumb.png.7b7bb4c3312e924ec2c148f7ccdde627.png

 

I notice a few mud-wall tires on those '40s vehicles but not many white walls! Probably not so many sealed roads in that area.

 

Actually I am not surprised it has remained at 14 years. Modern cars last well. Another reason is that some cars arrive in from Japan with very low mileages (or kilometres if you prefer). My go to work car is a 2004 Toyota which I bought in February 2013 at 20,000 km (about 12,000 miles). It now has 68,000 km on it - barely run in. An oil and filter change every year, an air filter every second and that is about it. It has had front pads and front tyres, and a battery. Cheap to run - 45 mpg Imperial on a run, about 34 around town. Our 1987 Toyota Crown went over 300,000 km on its original clutch. The original engine is out for a rebuild at the moment at 386,000 km. The valve gear was worn out. It was decided to upgrade it with a twin cam, 24 valve head. With all new internals we should get another 380,000 km out of it.

 

As I noted before new cars sales are strong but there are plenty of people keeping the older ones going - it is usually rust which causes their demise.

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In the Ekatahuna photo there are at least 2 post war cars.  There is an Austin Devon (1947-52) behind the homebuilt "pickup" in front of the WCPA store and across the street behind the prewar .Morris 8 is a 1948-51 Vauxhall.  

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8 hours ago, dictator27 said:

In the Ekatahuna photo there are at least 2 post war cars.  There is an Austin Devon (1947-52) behind the homebuilt "pickup" in front of the WCPA store and across the street behind the prewar .Morris 8 is a 1948-51 Vauxhall.  

 

The car behind the 'homebuilt pickup' is a Morris 10 - probably just pre war.  Facing us above the '37 or '38 Chev is an Austin 8 which is likely to be post war.   There are lots of anecdotes about the lengths people went to, in order to obtain a new car. There were restrictions on imports right through to the 1970s.

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2 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

There are lots of anecdotes about the lengths people went to, in order to obtain a new car.

 

Here is one. In the '90s, my neighbour still had her 1965 Holden as her everyday car. She bought it new. She was Hungarian with overseas funds so could buy a car. About $1100 I think it cost. She had hardly driven it home when she was rung by someone offering at least $1400 for the car. One needed overseas funds to buy a car, so many farmers bought new cars - they had their meat and wool cheques in overseas funds.

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7 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

 

Here is one. In the '90s, my neighbour still had her 1965 Holden as her everyday car. She bought it new. She was Hungarian with overseas funds so could buy a car. About $1100 I think it cost. She had hardly driven it home when she was rung by someone offering at least $1400 for the car. One needed overseas funds to buy a car, so many farmers bought new cars - they had their meat and wool cheques in overseas funds.

 

I presume you mean pounds sterling rather than dollars.

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17 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

The car behind the 'homebuilt pickup' is a Morris 10 - probably just pre war. 

Jeez😗  I owned a 1946 Morris 10 and didn't recognize It!

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