CatBird

Advice for an open touring car 1929-1934?

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Want reliable and I like the open 7 passenger touring cars. I like the style up until 1935. Reliable, classic lines, 8 cyl is fine, rollup windows. I like the high-end marques.

What do you recommend?

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I don't know of many open 7-passenger touring cars that also have roll-up windows. You're talking oranges and grapefruits, so to speak. A convertible sedan will have roll-up windows but most are 5-passenger models, not 7. A 7-passenger touring car will not have windows, just side curtains. They look significantly different, even though both are 4-door convertibles, with the touring cars generally being more sporting and less formal-looking. Convertible sedans often have a more upright look simply because of the roll up windows--the angles have to be straighter to accommodate the flat glass.

 

Here's a 1934 Packard Eight convertible sedan:

 

poster.jpg

 

Here's a 1934 Packard Eight 7-passenger touring:

 

8742827-23-10.jpg&width=640&height=480&a

 

You can see the differences quite easily. One isn't better than the other, but the experience is different. For instance, I know of very few convertible sedan owners who actually put their tops down regularly because it's a big job. Phaeton tops go down more easily but don't seal up as well in inclement weather (although neither will be anything like a modern car).

 

At any rate, if you're looking for a big, high-end open car, you can't go wrong with any of the major marques, Cadillac, Packard, Lincoln, Marmon, etc. Bodies can be catalog bodies or customs, and prices are all over the map depending on how much car is under the body and just how custom the body is. There are those who will argue for their own personal favorites, but in that time period, all the high-end marques were exceptional cars. Find the one you like the best and that's the right one for you. I would encourage you to drive all your potentials as well, since they often do drive quite differently. Again, not better or worse, just different. But you will not regret any quality Full Classic open car of the early '30s, they're my personal favorites.

 

Have fun in the search!

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Bill,  a seven passenger touring car would NOT have windows. A convertible sedan would, but MOST convertiable sedans are close coupled and are 4/5 passengers. Currently the market on convertiable sedans is VERY soft, and seven passenger touring cars are not in high demand either. I would recommend buying something different than you already have to diversify the collection from a display and museum aspect. The later the year, the better the driver, but also you have fewer choices as most of the manufacturers were gone by 1934. That leaves Cadillac, Packard, Lincoln, and about five Pierce Arrows. I’m sure you know what I would recommend. Before you pull a trigger on any car, give me a ring and we can go over it. My best, Ed.

 

Hope to,see you at Amelia! 

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I would recommend the 33 Pierce RM is selling at Amelia.  Coachbuilt, big engine and comes from a good home.  I would link it but I’m sitting in an airport on my phone.

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8 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

8742827-23-10.jpg&width=640&height=480&a

 

 

The curse of the trimmer in me, I look at tops .... and this one is awful...the car would be a whole different beast with a nice top on it, that not only followed the correct side cut but also didn't look like a starved horse....love the car, hate the top....

 

As mentioned, 7 passenger touring cars usually are awkward looking with too much body...a 5 passenger touring seems to have much nicer and sportier lines...

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I agree , Trim. It has to have a correct top. I too praise or curse the top, and I'm not a trimmer. Hopefully that top guy is in prison today.

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Mea Culpa about the 7 pass touring. in my defense, I blurted out the initial request battling the flu and thinking this illness will EVER end? Haven't even had a cold in years. I have 

Rethinking the idea may be along a convertible sedan and I need to drive a few and see how well they drive. I have a 1933 Packard Victoria that is more difficult to steer, especially at low speeds as opposed to a 1935 Auburn Phaeton that feels like power steering. Possibly the Packard has a steering issue? Our 1937 Lincoln Model K, Willoughby Limo, is quite easy to drive. Not to big deal for me to drive either, but my wife loves to drive classics. She has a blast in the '35 Auburn, but the '33 Packard is a chore for her.

 

All my life I have had convertibles and even though rarely put down the top. Possibly should be looking at a sedan? Or a Limo? I like to take friends with me.

Edited by CatBird (see edit history)

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Your Packard may need a front end alignment. It is possible to make an old car steer easier by reducing the caster but you must install a steering damper to prevent shimmy.

 

It might be that there are some better buys in less popular makes like Studebaker President (pre 1934) and Nash Ambassador Eight.

 

image.png.88f0dc9183cbc4f8ae89cf263d444940.png

 

image.png.df31fd0cd01779e84c6bce091c201668.png

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

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The Auburn is a much lighter car so that could be part of it,  but the real issue is probably steering box, idler arm, drag link, etc, etc.   A dialed in steering system vs a worn one is night and day.

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21 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

Your Packard may need a front end alignment. It is possible to make an old car steer easier by reducing the caster but you must install a steering damper to prevent shimmy.

 

It might be that there are some better buys in less popular makes like Studebaker President (pre 1934) and Nash Ambassador Eight.

 

 

I think there is only one of those Studebakers and 3 or 4  of the Nash so they will be tough to find.  The last Nash Ambassador convertible sedan sold for some really good money.

 

Here is the Pierce I was referring too.

 

https://www.rmsothebys.com/en/auctions/AM18/Amelia-Island/lots/r0012-1933-pierce-arrow-twelve-convertible-sedan-by-lebaron/602460

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33PierceV12Lebaron.jpg

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)

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Rusty,

 

Got a chuckle out of the sample, 1932 Studebaker that you indicated might be a better buy. That car is one of two extent, and has just won it's class at Pebble Beach. Plus I doubt that the owner would sell, anyway. If the gentleman inquiring about a convertible sedan, with "reliable classic lines," and "high end  marques,", would be willing to define his terms. All the big Studebaker Presidents 1928-33 (less the 1933 Model 82) and the larger Nash offerings are CCCA "full Classics." They are also are more rare, then a similar Pierce, Packard or Cadillac. One of the smaller offerings of these companies, might be less expensive, if one can be found.

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You cannot go wrong with a 1929 - 1934 Packard. Ours is a relatively affordable model, a 1930 Model 733 Dual windshield 7-passenger Touring:

1930 PACKARD LEFT-FRONT.jpg

1930 Packard at Oak Alley Plantation - right 4-9-2013.png

1930 Packard at Oak Alley Plantation - driver side.JPG

011a35393217a0b42f73e697fbabe61f8d4740efba.jpg

0163047799607e3fa045363dc3008c47452d9e1c7a.jpg

01549461d46644e7f887f42f650ef9a018c1515170.jpg

01a5c6ceb82d02971a1745e22dd45be88aa4b5989a.jpg

1930 Packard at louisville 75th Anniversary Meet 008.jpg

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Great car, of course, Marty, but he wants roll up windows...which is a whole different genre than our little phaetons!  He wants, respectively, a pane in the glass.  Crud, in one of the pictures I even seem to be missing both windshields!

IMG_5550.JPG

IMG_5549.JPG

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42 minutes ago, trimacar said:

Great car, of course, Marty, but he wants roll up windows...which is a whole different genre than our little phaetons!  He wants, respectively, a pane in the glass.  Crud, in one of the pictures I even seem to be missing both windshields!

 

 

Seems he needs to make a choice:

Either Roll-Up Windows,

or

7-Passenger

 

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46 minutes ago, trimacar said:

Great car, of course, Marty, but he wants roll up windows...which is a whole different genre than our little phaetons!  He wants, respectively, a pane in the glass.  Crud, in one of the pictures I even seem to be missing both windshields!

 

 

Seems he needs to make a choice:

Either Roll-Up Windows,

or

7-Passenger

 

And David, you know that Dale & I have loved your Pierce-Arrow ever since you took us for a drive following a Mardi Gras Parade that very cool night so many years ago, shortly after it came to live with you here in Louisiana ;-)

 

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)

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On ‎2‎/‎17‎/‎2018 at 12:59 PM, Rusty_OToole said:

image.png.df31fd0cd01779e84c6bce091c201668.png

 

Forgive my saying it but this car would........ahem.........take some getting used to, Todd C

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Thanks, guys, turning over some ideas, but most of my mind is on getting my garage and display barn. But it is getting ready to just get it built. The wrinkle is in getting the right people to install and concrete pads. A 100x80 and another 30x60

 

I have three touring cars and freeze my tail off in the winter. I like the space in a 7-pass, but the side curtains are a pain. Maybe look for something else So I'd like something that has four-wheel brakes, a heater, some kind of enclosed space, something easier to drive in my 1916 Pierce, but I really LOVE this car! 

I like the high-end cars, maybe a Cord? Duesenberg? Packards are very good. Maybe a Studebaker Presidential? I like cars with a story. Even just a good story.

 

I love my 1933 Packard Victoria and it does well with the above. I probably should redo the final drive as it feels like it is screaming at 60mph.

 

Not too hot for Fords, Chevies, that ilk.  

I am selling off my real estate portfolio and buying cars. Having fun. Why the hell not? Have worked hard all my life, time to play.

 

I love the amazing technology in the grand old cars. The '16 Pierce is a masterpiece of tech! 

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Bill and Anne,

   An interesting quest you´re on....if for no other reason than the nice graphics of all manner of motorcars being suggested. I´m not either of you, though neither are any of the other posters here, but listen to the Assistant Curator of Vision & Discernment for your collection, please(me, for five minutes). If I really had that job, I would say go to Hemmings online and print out all 328 cars for sale which are Packards. If you can´t find the right car there......something´s wrong. Have the curator convert them into something like playing cards - 3 x 5 cards will do - then stack them w/ the undesirables on the bottom and the desirables on top. Grab the top 33 cars and pick one from there. Done.

   You just did 1880s-style data processing, and you would have some pretty cool cars in your new mix, I trust. Personally, I like the 1924 626 Single Six Roadster in CA, and the 1928 443 Murphy Convertible Sedan in MO; but you may like the red 1938 Super 8 1605 Convertible Sedan in MI, the Carlton Carriage Coachbuilt 1936 120 Coupe de Ville in Virginia Water, U.K.(for the life of me can´t figure out if it seats 2 or 5), or the 1934 1100 Victoria Convertible in Nebraska(needs a lot of work - - - but a finished one would be good*).

 

  Yes -- there are other fine car builders** -- but Packards have numbers and quality -- so it´s a good statrt. I scrolled through all 328 cars, and saw that they weren´t all Packards. Hemmings Motor News had all the blurbs of cars for sale which used the word ¨Packard¨...so ads for Cords, Pierce-Arrows, and a few others got in, too.

 

.........Jeff

 

* There is a ´35 12 Convertible Victoria in OK(no photo) -- a ´35 1201 Eight in OH -- and a maroon ´40 Super 8 in NY.

** One can get a ´30 L-29 Convertible Sedan in MO for less than two Woodrow Wilsons.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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3 hours ago, mvmautorossa said:

Our 1930 Springfield Rolls-Royce Phantom I with Brewster Special Newmarket body is a seven passenger with roll-up windows.

 

Bob

 

 

S435MR AR8 (small) DSC_9559.jpg

 

In my opinion, there are a lot of Rolls Royce bodies that aren't attractive.  Your Springfield isn't one of them.  What a beautiful car.  Personally, I'd get rid of the baggy sidemount cover, but that's a minor nit pick....thanks for posting picture...

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I think most Brewster Springfield built RR tend to the attractive side of things, but the Newmarket is a very attractive convertible sedan.  On the tire cover,  I never liked cloth, so for me I would go without.

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