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I need a new Speedo cable for my 63, was looking at rock auto and was wondering if it was the right length and if anyone has experience with them? Also what lube do you all use? I pulled mine out and it was really dark, looked like grease but that seems a bit thick. Please be specific with the lube part, really want to get that part right. 

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Is the old one broken or just gummed up?  If it's just gummy, use some brake kleen to remove the old grease, then use powered graphite to lube it once everything is clean. Meazure your old one and call Rock Auto to find the length of tbe new one.  You can probably use one thats a little longer without a problem.

 

Ed

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)

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26 minutes ago, offdensen said:

Old one is broken. And graphite, like for door locks? They have stuff like this at the ace hardware down the street from me. https://m.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=53384466

 

Comes in a tube, or spray can. 

Powered usually comes in a tube like antibiotic cream.  You squeeze it and it puffs out of the tube.  When you get the new one pull the cable from the sheath and see how or if it's lived.   If not, "puff" some powder into the sheath then reinsert the cable. You want to use a dry lubricant.  If you use a wet one, it will gather dust and dirt and eventually gum up again.

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)

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Do I only puff into the sheath, and not the cable itself before reinsertion? I would imagine I just use half the tube on one opening then the other half on the other opening, since it really isn't a big tube. Can it be overlubed? 

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If you try to coat the cable, you'll have almost all of the powder on the garage floor.  Squirt some in the sheath, and insert the cable. Pull the cable back out and see if there are any uncoated places. Repeat.  Slide the cable in and out until everything glides easily.  I would imagine that you can get too much in the sheath.

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)
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In my shop I've always used a tube of engine assembly grease to grease the cables after cleaning them thoroughly. Never had to go back in

and fix it again ever. My  GTO speedo cable was lubed this way 40 years ago....still works great with no noise. The original lube failed at 8 years

of age. Engine assembly lube is available at any auto parts store.....it has moly- graphite in it.

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I have a large NOS tube of genuine AC Speedometer Cable Grease from the 1960's. It is a cream-colored grease product, not quite as thick as the engine assembly lube Seafoam65 has used successfully. John

Edited by Jolly_John (see edit history)

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@Jolly_John

Curious if the tube says what the lube is made of? Obviously that stuff works, or else our rivs wouldn't have working speedos from the get go. I will try the graphite first since i already have it and see how it works. Getting the cable in the mail today. 

Edited by offdensen (see edit history)

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7 minutes ago, offdensen said:

@Jolly_John

Curious if the tube says what the lube is made of? Obviously that stuff works, or else our rivs wouldn't have working speedos from the get go. I will try the graphite first since i already have it and see how it works. Getting the cable in the mail today. 

Well over the past 50+ years, we've learned that eventually the original lube will gum up.  The good thing about it is that we'll probably not be around when these cars are 100 years old so we'll never see it gum up again.

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Interesting thread as my speedo dances around, especially when the car is first driven.

 

What/how is the best way to change out the cable?  I have a new cable, but not the casing.  Can/should I take it off the transmission, pull the cable out, lube the new one going back it?  Or, do I need to get behind the dash and take it off at the speedometer?

 

Advice is always welcome.  Sun is shining here, roads are dry, and I think all my lights are working.  Riv will get a run this morning.

 

 

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5 hours ago, Zimm63 said:

Interesting thread as my speedo dances around, especially when the car is first driven.

 

What/how is the best way to change out the cable?  I have a new cable, but not the casing.  Can/should I take it off the transmission, pull the cable out, lube the new one going back it?  Or, do I need to get behind the dash and take it off at the speedometer?

 

Advice is always welcome.  Sun is shining here, roads are dry, and I think all my lights are working.  Riv will get a run this morning.

 

 

What you're describing is at least worth a try.

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On ‎2‎/‎16‎/‎2018 at 9:36 AM, offdensen said:

@Jolly_John

Curious if the tube says what the lube is made of? Obviously that stuff works, or else our rivs wouldn't have working speedos from the get go. I will try the graphite first since i already have it and see how it works. Getting the cable in the mail today. 

 

There's no mention on the tube or the box, as to what kind of grease is inside this NOS tube of genuine AC Speedometer Lube. I don't know if it was some kind of proprietary AC formula or not. I recently removed the metal screw-on cap to see what the grease was like. It appears to be in good condition (no oil separation or hardening), even thought I'm pretty sure this is a 1960's-vintage product. John

Edited by Jolly_John (see edit history)

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11 hours ago, Zimm63 said:

Interesting thread as my speedo dances around, especially when the car is first driven.

 

What/how is the best way to change out the cable?  I have a new cable, but not the casing.  Can/should I take it off the transmission, pull the cable out, lube the new one going back it?  Or, do I need to get behind the dash and take it off at the speedometer?

 

Advice is always welcome.  Sun is shining here, roads are dry, and I think all my lights are working.  Riv will get a run this morning.

 

 

 

Pull the cable, hold one end between your thumb and index finger, then roll it back and forth.  If it "flops", it's kinked -- and that kink will make the speedometer bounce.  Good cable or not, lube it up and reinstall.

 

A bouncing speedo is a minor annoyance by itself, but it's a real PITA if you're trying to use cruise control.

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On 2/17/2018 at 4:42 PM, telriv said:

I ALWAYS use Kendall Super Blue. Maintains consistency, NEVER hardens, 10 yrs. from now will be the same. Been using for 25+ yrs.

Tom, Red Riviera Bob,here with a question regarding a 63 Buick Riviera leaking black fluid on the driver side floor mat.

would you speculate how I might stop the leakage. The speedometer cable is quiet, but about 5% fast.

Any ideas on how to stop the leak?

thank you

Bob Burnopp ( aka Red Riviera Bob)

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20 hours ago, Red Riviera Bob said:

Tom, Red Riviera Bob,here with a question regarding a 63 Buick Riviera leaking black fluid on the driver side floor mat.

would you speculate how I might stop the leakage. The speedometer cable is quiet, but about 5% fast.

Any ideas on how to stop the leak?

thank you

Bob Burnopp ( aka Red Riviera Bob)

Have you been able to identify what kind of "fluid" it is?  That would help.  

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There are only two fluids I know of that can leak from the dash. (1) Oil Gage pipe leaking from a mechanical Gage. and (2) The speedo cable and I think that is where it is coming from. The gear in the transmission is allowing the fluid to travel up the cable. If you look at the cable you can see that the cable is made by twisting the metal. This is done to pull some fluid up from the trans to keep the cable lubed ( the idea wasn't a very good one) I would suggest to change the cable and case and the seal in the gear housing. You can get a new cable and case (that way you get the correct length) . Buying just the cable can give you problems with getting it right because the tip that goes into the speedo head has to be crimped and all to often doesn't hold. If you want to just change the cable it has to come out from the speedo head not from the trans.

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Speedo works again. Cable seems to move pretty freely but is really fast. Might need a different gear head with more teeth. Anyone have an equation or something for figuring this out? I'm working with 18 teeth and the Speedo reads 45mph at 40mph, but 80mph at 65mph. I brought it up to 80mph and the gauge read 120mph. As much as I'd like to scare passengers with my innacurate gauge I would prefer a accurate reading. 

 

On the topic of leaking from behind the dash, I would imagine that graphite powder can't leak, so that might be a good upside to using it. 

 

Edited by offdensen (see edit history)

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I had to do this about a month ago for the Turbo 350 in a friends 54 Chevy. There are two gears. The smaller drive gear where the cable hooks in and the larger driven gear in the transmission. We ended up changing the driven gear inside the transmission from nine tooth to an eight to make his read correctly. But of course, this was not the original transmission to the car. Here is the formula. You have to know rear axle ratio (or at least close), tire diameter, gear teeth and RPM at 60 MPH. Not sure about the Dynaflow, but in 350s and 400s, gears are colored. Each gear, drive and driven, have their own color based on number of teeth. See what is available and substitute into the formula until you find something close. Check Ebay for gear availability and number of teeth. You may not get it exact, but you can get really close.

http://www.monstertransmission.com/Speedometer-Gear-Calculator_ep_122-1.html

Edited by steelman (see edit history)

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Here is another one that is easier to use, but you must know the number of teeth on the driven gear inside the transmission. Again, these are colored, so remove the drive gear and look in the hole with a flashlight to see the color of the driven gear. Once you know the color, you can determine how many teeth are on that gear and use this formula.

http://www.moveras.com/Support/Tools/SpeedometerDriveGearCalculator.aspx

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