Roger Frazee

Heirloom Tools

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After keeping it in a drawer for many years, I finally got the chance to use my grandfather's gasket cutter.  It worked like a charm and it took me back to the days when he and I would make wooden toys in his garage.  He used the gasket cutter to make wooden wheels for our hand-carved cars.  Who knew it would actually make gaskets too?

 

Has anyone else used a gasket cutter like this?

IMG_5870.JPG

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That is a nice one. I see it has the usual square tapered shaft to use it in a brace. Have not seen one with the two knives. Dad had one with a single knife, otherwise identical. We used it to cut leather washers for pumps and the like. I think he also used it to cut neat holes in metal guttering, which I always assumed was what it was designed for.

 

Many times I wished I had one, when I didn't have the exact size hole punch. I keep an eye out, but have not found one for sale.

Edited by Bush Mechanic
clarification (see edit history)

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22 minutes ago, Bush Mechanic said:

That is a nice one. I see it has the usual square tapered shaft to use it in a brace. Have not seen one with the two knives. Dad had one with a single knife, otherwise identical. We used it to cut leather washers for pumps and the like. I think he also used it to cut neat holes in metal guttering, which I always assumed was what it was designed for.

 

Many times I wished I had one, when I didn't have the exact size hole punch. I keep an eye out, but have not found one for sale.

 

The $100.00 question is how many people know what a brace is?  I know because I use one to assemble and disassemble my 125 year old pool table when we move.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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1 minute ago, Larry Schramm said:

The $100.00 question is how many people know what a brace is? 

 

I know. I have one and actually use it on occasion. But I've never seen a gasket cutter like the one pictured. Pretty neat tool especially with the double blade......................Bob

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I have a LOT of heirloom tools...all over my shop and basement. Some were my dad's, some belonged to one or the other grandfather, some to my great grandfather, and some to his father. Plus I've bought quite a bit of old "junk tools" at sales, etc, for decades. I'll post some photos tomorrow. 

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No, but I would like to have one !  That cuts the OD and ID at one time.   I have a circle cutter that uses a razor blade that cuts the OD. If the ID is is only say 3/32 less it will screw it up every time.  Gauges use those fine-line gaskets

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I too have several braces, plus several sets of bits. I do have expandable buts for them.  But no gasket cutter like that!

 

You can tell my forefathers were into woodworking.;)

 

I also have a breast drill and a corner but brace. Surprising, the corner bit brace was still being made into the 80s.

 

I call these my "cordless" drills with lifetime batteries!:D

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We have a lot of my grandfathers old tools, and they're all high quality and made in Australia - his socket and ratchet set are much better than anything I've been able to buy

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I have a foot locker full of antique wood planes that were my wife's great grandfather's.  And several hand forged hammers and blacksmith tongs, ladles, etc. that were my great grandfather's. 

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I don't have one of these, but have several braces and numerous bits that were my grandfather's. ( I'm in my upper 60's).  I also have a handmade carpenters tool box that holds alot of tools that also belonged to my grandfather.  I remember that my dad taught me how to use a ball peen hammer to make gaskets.  Have done it numerous times.  Just gotta make sure the material doesn't move.

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My dad didn't have a lot of tools, he was mostly a bailing wire and pliers, duct tape kind of guy. He did have a vise grips that I have in my junkin bag that I take along to junk yards. He has passed on now and when I pull the vise grips out I say to myself "Dad is helping me today"

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9 hours ago, Larry Schramm said:

 

The $100.00 question is how many people know what a brace is?  I know because I use one to assemble and disassemble my 125 year old pool table when we move.

 

Brace and bit was on my tool list as required tools when I was accepted into the electrical  workers union apprenticeship program in the 70's

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1 hour ago, Dave Mellor NJ said:

I'll bet not many guys today have ever used a star drill.

 

You meant to say @$*&^^ star drill.... I hated those things. If you want to bring back some memories I have a set I will give you

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This is the tool for cutting round gaskets, never seen one before and I like it.

Gave my brace and bits to a neighbor and don't miss having it around. I still have a star drill and I've used it in the past 20 years, sometimes the old way is still the best way, but luckily not to often.

The tool I had and used until it wore so bad that it literally fell apart was a squeeze handle yankee screwdriver, anyone know where I could get another.

Edited by Digger914 (see edit history)

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19 hours ago, Roger Frazee said:

After keeping it in a drawer for many years, I finally got the chance to use my grandfather's gasket cutter.  It worked like a charm and it took me back to the days when he and I would make wooden toys in his garage.  He used the gasket cutter to make wooden wheels for our hand-carved cars.  Who knew it would actually make gaskets too?

 

Has anyone else used a gasket cutter like this?

IMG_5870.JPG

 

That's a unique tool Roger. I've never saw one like it. An old railroad machinist taught me how to use a small ball-peen hammer to cut gaskets. I'm sure your tool does a better job.

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Does anyone know where there is a double gasket cutter like that?  Either old or new.

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They even made their way Down Under.

I got it from my Dad maybe it was his Dads.

Started my carpenter apprenticeship in 1962 the only power tool was a small electric drill we had to share between 20 or so people.

I don't miss the hand tools one bit but I still have quite a few in the shed.

DSCN1306.JPG

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6 hours ago, Curti said:

Does anyone know where there is a double gasket cutter like that?  Either old or new.

There are a few on E-bay.  Prices are in the $40 range.

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Ya, I found some,   Has anyone ever used one of these in a drill press as opposed to a brace & bit?

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39EP63_AS01?$mdmain$

 

I've cut both aluminum and copper with this circle cutting bit, including making copper exhaust manifold gaskets by cutting the circular hole for the exhaust port then trimming the outside oval shape with metal shears and drilling holes for the manifold studs. I can say these out-of-balance bits need to be run at low rpm. I used a variable speed drill and squeezed the trigger only lightly.

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35 minutes ago, mike6024 said:

39EP63_AS01?$mdmain$

 

I've cut both aluminum and copper with this circle cutting bit, including making copper exhaust manifold gaskets by cutting the circular hole for the exhaust port then trimming the outside oval shape with metal shears and drilling holes for the manifold studs. I can say these out-of-balance bits need to be run at low rpm. I used a variable speed drill and squeezed the trigger only lightly.

I've cut a few hundred holes with one of these.

I just used it a couple of months ago to put some speakers in some plywood. 

I still have one nib in case I need one.

I put many dash gauges in boats with this.

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