TerryB

Did You Ever Own.....

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You're close, Greg.  The Minor did have torsion bar front suspension, but it was Jowett that gave Chrysler the idea.  The Javelin had torsion bars at all four corners.  The original straight Chrysler torsion bar suspension is almost a carbon copy of the Javelin's front suspension.  Technically, the Javelin is a very interesting car in a number of areas.

 

Terry

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Although I grew up on the East coast of Canada, when I was a teenager I was into British cars. My first car was a 62 Consul 315 ( Capri ). I also had a 58 Wolseley, 61 and 64 Rover 3 litres. Austins were a popular car here, Hillmans, Vauxhall. but there is one still here that has evaded me and is unusual. It is a Daimler Dart.

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36 minutes ago, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

 

 Thought you were an old codger.  These were your OLD cars?    Now I really feel old.  Thanks a lot.:lol:

 

  Ben

I said I was old, I didn't say I was ancient!

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I had an old SAAB 2 stroke and yes, few gas attendants were willing to put a quart of oil into the gas tank prior to filling up. Other oddball family owned daily drivers included Morris Minor, Fiat TV-1000 Spider conv, Austin 850, MG 1100. Also a LeCar which is a little later than the parameters but was a true oddball nonetheless. Perhaps motorcycles don't count but I had a Bultaco 175cc street bike I rode daily, weather permitting.

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Dad had a couple Ford Cortinas in the early 70s - a wagon and a sedan. Not his typical vehicle which would normally have been something BIG, but they fit the budget at the time. Both served him well. I really liked the wagon, but he sold it shortly before I got my license.

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How about a '59 Deutsch-Bonnet  Panhard?  I was the proud owner of one which originally came with an air cooled, 2 opposed cylinder engine, fwd, covered headlights in the fenders as in the E Type Jaguar, and a fiberglass body.  Sadly,   just a conversation piece, if only the engine had come along with mine.  JokingMVC-126S.JPG.8cfc56f933eb80044d0c7cee6ff577a4.JPGaside, they were very successful in their class at LeMans.
Then there was the Siata Berlinetta with aluminum body,  independent rear suspension, dual carburetors, and trunk lid hinged like a door.  Again, a non-driver   

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1959 Taunus,  wagon.  got it out of a junk yard in 1963 with 32,000 miles.  excellent shape except for the sugar in the gas tank that cooked in the carb.

Cleaned carb installed new gas filters every two weeks  for months and it cleaned it self up.

Even loaned it to friend at work, for  three months, who's   Ford convertible was  being repaired after a roll over.

Ended up selling it to a Dutch farmer near Saugatuck Michigan when pin in cam drive gear on distributor  broke.

It had about 45,000 on it then, and was a good little car for the money.

 

Never seen one since

 

 

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2 hours ago, dictator27 said:

Trivia question:  We all know about Chryslers torsion bar front suspension which they used from the middle 50's.  Which British car maker gave them the idea?

 

 

I believe 1912Staver is correct. The Morris Minor had very advanced handling for 1949, when it was released. We liked the torsion bar set-up, as the suspension was easy to lower at the front. At the back we sometimes used the oxy torch to heat the springs. (Seemed feasible at midnight, on the eve of race-day).

 

As it was, our's handled far better than the Ford Customlines, Desotos, Chevs, FX Holdens and other barges, around the dirt oval. We did OK, until the son of the local BMC dealer turned up with one of those new-fangled front drive Minis, complete with a chain and cog quick-rack steering set-up. That car was un-catchable. Just weaved in and out of the larger cars to the front, and disappeared!

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Sorry Dictator, I stand corrected. (I missed the second page of replies). 

 

I did admire those Jowett Jupiters, the sports version. We raced against one, using a hopped up MG Magnette sedan, and he was always quicker than us.

 

Mick.

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15 hours ago, J.H.Boland said:

I had a 1971 Renault 16TS that I bought new. It was powered by a 4 cylinder hemi,with four on the tree.It was a 4 door hatchback,and with the rear seat folded down and forward could carry quite a load.The quartz headlights could be adjusted up or down by a big knob under the dash,in case you had the back overloaded.The wheelbase was different on each side,as each rear wheel was mounted on independent axles,one ahead of the other.It was very comfortable and very quick.It's biggest problem was that it had no inner fenders and rusted out badly where the electrical junction box was located.It cost about as much as a new Impala at the time.

 

The TS was the top-of-the-line 16 which is why it cost as much as a new Impala back then.  There was the base 16, the 16TA, and the 16TS that year.  Yours would have had power windows, but only the fronts.

 

Craig

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16 hours ago, Pilgrim65 said:

Being from the UK 

humbers were quite common when I was a boy , some people called them ‘ poor mans rolls Royce ‘

remember they had lovely leather and beutiful wood veneers . Super snipes were top of range I think and were large cars by English standards and often were chosen as wedding cars and official cars for council and government top dogs. Class cars , but design wise not that attractive, I preferred the Alvis which was around at the same time , may have been dearer , but being still at school physical appearance was the primary factor  my favourite cars, usually sports cars Jaguar XK 120 and my all time favourite a  corvette!!

 

There were a few Super Snipes in the area of which I lived in Edmonton.  For a time, I owned BMC's closest competitor to the Rootes offering; a 1965 Vanden Plas 4-litre R.

 

Craig

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Had a Mazda RX7 with a Wankel Rotary engine once. A neighbor gave it to me when it started spitting antifreeze out of the exhaust. My first intention was to pull it apart and see what failed in it but a few years went by and I was moving so it ended up at my buddies salvage yard. Wasn't worth much back in the late 70's or early 80's. I remember the neighbor said it was really not that good on gas either. Also I remember a 1960's two cycle Peugeot that was in the neighborhood. Buzzed up the road and smoked like the dickens. Dandy Dave! 

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In the early '70s I drove a 1964 Taunus (not Taurus), which was a German Ford, a small 4 cylinder car.  I've also had some uncommon models of common makes such as a Fiat X19 (body by Bertone), a 1968 BMW 1800TI (a 4 cylinder, 2 carburetored 4 door sedan, I believe one won a class in the European Hill Climb Championship about 1966 or 7), a Fiat 750 (basically a 600 but with suspension and engine by Abarth), and a 1966 Datsun 1600 roadster.  None of these were very expensive, but offered good performance at reasonable prices.  I enjoyed them all.

 

Larry

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13 hours ago, vermontboy said:

I had an old SAAB 2 stroke and yes, few gas attendants were willing to put a quart of oil into the gas tank prior to filling up. Other oddball family owned daily drivers included Morris Minor, Fiat TV-1000 Spider conv, Austin 850, MG 1100. Also a LeCar which is a little later than the parameters but was a true oddball nonetheless. Perhaps motorcycles don't count but I had a Bultaco 175cc street bike I rode daily, weather permitting.

I had a Husqvarna when everyone else had Yamaha, and yes I was one of those gas jockey doubters about putting oil in the gas.

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Around the end of the 60's I owned a 1961 Volvo Pv544.  It had a 4 cyl. engine with twin carbs and a window shade on the radiator ( for more heat inside the car) Anyway I had a set of Chrysler chrome reverse tires and  wheels on it and one day while waiting for the light to change I was challenged to pull a hole-shot. Light changed and I nailed it I looked back and saw the whole intersection engulfed in smoke from the tires, I also saw a flash of a red light and sure enough here he came so I pulled over he got out of his car and said he has never seen such a little car go so fast. When I told him it was a 4cyl. he had to look under the hood. Then he offered to trade me a BMW motorcycle for it ( he wrote me up for reckless driving ) because I turned him down.  

Edited by retiredmechanic74 (see edit history)
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Friend of mine had a Morris Minor. Was slow enough that it did not matter if you could not read the speedo. Remember driving a Mini in boots and hitting all three pedals at the same time. After I lost the GS my daily driver for some time was an MG 1100 that moved around to different club members as needed. Learned to speed shift in a FIAT 1500 roadster, could just bat the shifter and was in the next gear. Later I had a more mainstream FIAT 124 Spyder with 1498cc Twin Cam. Delco fixed the electronics and had the most air vents I had ever seen. Another FIAT was a 850R Coupe I paid $150 for needing a clutch (easy). Would buzz you to death at highway speed. Then there was the BMW 2000A. Every time my wife got too close to a curb I had to replace/rework the AC pulley. No power steering made it my car after a while. And had a Renault Dauphine for a while that I misplaced in the Carolinas somewhere. Paid $100 and the block was slightly cracked so did not look very hard.

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I grew up in Upstate NY - there was a family in our town that had a Citroen DS - pretty uncommon for our region. Another family drove a Checker sedan as their everyday car. A gent I worked with had a Renault Delphene, (sp?).

 

We were a GM family so an AMC was pretty exotic for us!

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, 8E45E said:

There were a few Super Snipes in the area of which I lived in Edmonton.  For a time, I owned BMC's closest competitor to the Rootes offering; a 1965 Vanden Plas 4-litre R.

 

Craig

The Vanden plas  versions , of bmc cars were beautifully finished , your model was actually the car I hired for my first wedding in 1968 and friend used to give me a lift to work in a Vanden plas 1100 , class lift!!

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15 minutes ago, AC Fuhrman said:

I grew up in Upstate NY - there was a family in our town that had a Citroen DS - pretty uncommon for our region. Another family drove a Checker sedan as their everyday car. A gent I worked with had a Renault Delphene, (sp?).

 

We were a GM family so an AMC was pretty exotic for us!

 

 

 

Citroen DS 55 , one of my all time favourite cars , way ahead of its time thought it looked like a space ship 

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A great friend of mine had a Morris Minor that he fixed up while in high school.  Sadly he passed away in his mid 20s from cancer.  I used to help him with the car and cruise around with him in it.  In his memory I recently purchased this item from the AACA library.

RIP Sam.

 

IMG_1106.JPG

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I guess my Dad would qualify.  One of my first car memories, at around age 4 or 5, was his NSU Prinz - maybe a '62.  It was a two cylinder rear engine car that looked a bit like a 2/3 scale, first generation Corvair.

 

That would have been pretty unusual in the mid-Sixties.  Hats off to my Dad!

 

Jeff

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I had a friend back in the late 50'S who had an English Ford and it had a burnt piston in it. I helped him replace the rod and piston. He thought the old piston and rod was "cute" so he hung it upside down on his rearview mirror. Now every time he would shift into second gear he would smash his knuckles into it taking off skin each time. I told him to remove the piston, but he refused. I said your tearing up your knuckles!!!! He said Ya I know but when people see my hand they think I was in a fight. The only thing I could say was......idiot.  

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I drove a Jag XK 140 in college. Not very exotic now but it sure was back then, especially here in small town PA. Friend drove a Renault Dauphine (sp?) which I actually remember as a reliable little car. In the garage behind our college apartment was an abandoned Borgward. Unfortunately that was before my interest in cars blossomed.

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All of my cars were oddballs for the area. They were cheap because no one wanted them: a 59 Morris Minor  especially a  4 door, an under powered green 71 Merc. Capri, 4 cyl., a boxy 63 Rambler American.

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