Dan283

1940 buick special starter wiring.

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Hello everyone !  Im new to this site. Was wondering if someone out there can help me out. I just purchased a 1940 buick special 2 door buisness coupe. The previous owner had taken the car completely apart. His plans was to chop the top and hot rod it. Its a very complete car so I decided to keep it original. With that in mind I am trying to check the motor out. And check compression and so on. I'm trying to get the starter to turn over. So I can see what I'm working with here.  I have the starter removed from car. The bindix kicks out but start won't spin. I'm jumping one terminal off the positive. And the other off the ground on the solenoid. Am I doing something wrong here ? Are does this mean my starter is junk ? Any help is greatly appreciated. 

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When the solenoid pulls in, it knocks a copper disc back against the two big copper bolts, shorting the one bolt that is connected to the battery cable to the other bolt that is connected to the starter windings. That makes the starter motor run.

 

If you have a battery connected to the starter (positive and ground), and you put 6v on one terminal of the little relay,and ground on the other, the relay kicks in, triggering the solenoid, which kicks the copper disc against the bolts, and the starter should run. It sounds like this is exactly what you are doing.

 

I would bet one or both of those copper bolts are burned up.

 

It is extremely unlikely the starter is shot. It just may need a little attention.

 

Just for grins, try connecting 6v directly  (heavy cable) to the other copper bolt. Starter motor (only) should run. Be careful, its gonna kick.

 

Here is a thread with some info about how the starter circuit works. There might be some minor differences due to year, but not that much. Buick kept autostart until 1960.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)

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Thanks ! Great advice ! Really do appreciate it..She turned right over. Now if I can just find the parts to fix it. Lol seems like finding parts for this car is a mission. Have been lucky on finding some parts. Any suggestions on where to get a starter rebuild kit for this thing ? Once again I appreciate the help. 

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Was it the copper bolts? Not making contact? In some of these copper bolt setups it is possible to turn the bolt around and use the other side of the head. Have you looked in there yet?

 

Sometimes you find out that was already done back in the day and there is nothing left.

 

I don't know where to send you for parts. Someone around here will know.

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Welcome to Straight 8 world :)

 

You will get more general information if you post down in http://forums.aaca.org/forum/60-buick-pre-war/

We speak Buick

 

Your engine may be later than 1940 (by the dip stick position)

 

+++++++++++++++

Download the 1942 Buick shop manual. All of it section by section. The pdf link does not work.

It is very comprehensive and has information that can be used with all straight 8’s.

It has more information than was included in older “Shop Manuals” before 1942-41

 

http://www.oldcarmanualproject.com/manuals/Buick/1942/Shop Manual/

Edited by 1939_Buick (see edit history)
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Dan, welcome!   My first Buick, back in 1953,  was a 1940 four door Special.  

 

  Good advice from both of the above guys.

 

  You do not say where you are, so a little difficult to say where to get parts. But we WANT to help. Parts are plentiful. 

 

  Ben

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Here's the very best advice you will get concerning your starter and your entire car project. The very first thing to buy is a shop manual. You are shooting in the dark with out one and are as likely to screw something up as fix it. I'd also suggest posting this and future questions to the Buick pre- war section. The Buick forum is a most watched and helpful here................Bob

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There probably isnt a starter rebuild "kit" but they arent complicated and any starter/generator rebuilder should be able to handle it with no problems. I have two good ones locally and they arent expensive. Having a pro do it so he can test it and make sure its right will make your life easier. Theres even a guy on these forums who apparently does a very nice job.

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Thanks for the welcome everyone... I took the starter apart gave it a good cleaning. Now its working like a new one! Must of been caused by dirty connections. Getting a shop manual is going to be my next move. The whole car is going to need rewired. And I only found a couple of places that sell the wiring harness for 750 and up. Think I will take the time and make my own. I plan on keeping it 6 volt. Want to keep it 100% stock if possible. Thanks very much for the help everyone. 

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The 1940 Shop manual is poor on details. The 1942 is far more comprehsive and detailed.  Generally not a lot changes year to year on the mechanical electrical side. But the part numbers can change.

 

You can also download (free) the 1952 Shop manual here (may have to register)

https://www.teambuick.com/reference/index.php

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Thanks for the link. Was getting ready to fire it up today. So I drained oil but only so much came out. So decided it would be a wise idea to take the pan off to see if there was any gunk. Boy am I glad I dropped the pan ! Lol The oil looked like mud ! The bottom end looks good and tight tho. Going to go ahead and check all my clearence's while I'm in there. If this motor needs to much work I do have another straight 8. Not sure the size or year tho. Here is the numbers on the pad in front of distributor. Motor in the car number is  43886553.. And other engine number is 43607832..Cant seem to find sites with info on these numbers. Any suggestions ? Please and thanks. Just bare with me while I get the hang of using this site. Its a little difficult when using a cell phone. Lol

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Think these are the actual casting numbers. Thinking the one in the car is original. But not sure ? Its casting number 1311572. And the other engine is 1303969

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https://www.teambuick.com/reference/ident_engine_til_52.php

 

4 3886553

4 = 40 series

3886553 = 1940

 

4 3607832

4 = 40 series

3607832 = 1939

 

1940 is a better engine, as it has a bigger oil pump. 

1939 heads do not have a stud at no. 8 cylinder (fire wall)

 

Casting numbers are usually not the same as part numbers in the Master Chassis Parts book

The only casting number that is the part number that I have noticed are the manifolds. But may be others

 

 

http://forums.aaca.org/topic/192534-request-year-info/

 

http://forums.aaca.org/topic/252522-1939-buick-engine-casting-number/

 

http://forums.aaca.org/topic/194922-buick-straight-eight-casting-number/

 

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Thank you very much for the information ! Do appreciate it ! The motor appeared to be original. But wasn't sure.. So I'm betting it probably is original to the car since its a 1940. I did notice the other engine didn't have that extra stud on the back. Very good info ! Nice to have some light shed on my questions. So I'm guessing it would be the 248 motor and not the 263. 

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10 minutes ago, Dan283 said:

Thank you very much for the information ! Do appreciate it ! The motor appeared to be original. But wasn't sure.. So I'm betting it probably is original to the car since its a 1940. I did notice the other engine didn't have that extra stud on the back. Very good info ! Nice to have some light shed on my questions. So I'm guessing it would be the 248 motor and not the 263. 

 

  Correct, Dan, a 248..  First 263 was 1950.

 

  Ben

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Thanks Ben ! That's what I thought but wasn't sure. These old buick's are all new territory for me. Lol the oldest vehicle I have every owned was a 1949 chevy truck. But have had a few 57 chevy in the past. I'm really more of a tri five guy. Know a whole lot about them. But this old buick is pretty cool and defiantly going to be a keeper. 

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4 hours ago, Dan283 said:

The motor appeared to be original. But wasn't sure.. So I'm betting it probably is original to the car since its a 1940. I did notice the other engine didn't have that extra stud on the back. Very good info ! Nice to have some light shed on my questions. So I'm guessing it would be the 248 motor and not the 263. 

OK. So the '39 still has the original head. 1939 is the only year this was done.

The parts and accessories on these 1938/39-1950 engines are often swapped around.

But can be small differences. Such as the flywheel teeth on a 1939 are not the same as 1940.  1939's have a lot of 1 year only parts

 

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12 hours ago, Dan283 said:

Thanks Ben ! That's what I thought but wasn't sure. These old buick's are all new territory for me. Lol the oldest vehicle I have every owned was a 1949 chevy truck. But have had a few 57 chevy in the past. I'm really more of a tri five guy. Know a whole lot about them. But this old buick is pretty cool and defiantly going to be a keeper. 

 

 Careful!  It just may run the little brothers off.

 

  Ben

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19 hours ago, 1939_Buick said:

OK. So the '39 still has the original head. 1939 is the only year this was done.

The parts and accessories on these 1938/39-1950 engines are often swapped around.

But can be small differences. Such as the flywheel teeth on a 1939 are not the same as 1940.  1939's have a lot of 1 year only parts

 

Thanks. Don't think I really have much use for the 39 engine then. Going to just fix original engine . I will be putting the 39 motor up for sale. I did start it up on the ground for a few mins. Sounds good. And does appear to been rebuild at one time. Looks like a pretty clean engine ! Any idea's on the value on it would be ? Oil looks good and clean too. 

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Would not even think about selling the '39 engine until your car is going. Many late 30's/40 Buicks have engine from other years. Would bolt in.

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I Think I'm going to take your advice on this.. The more I got looking around for these engines. The more I realized they are not so easy to find. Still going to stick with my original engine. But would be good insurance to keep this one as a backup spare. 

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