Imperial62

64 Wildcat $7000 but....only 61K miles

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Let me tell you about this guy... I sent him a message, asking what he knew about the car. He came back to me with a question: "what do you need to know?" I responded, "it is a 50 year old car, how about everything you know about it?" 

He sends me a text that said: "I bought the car a little over two years ago, and when it is not raining or it is freezing, or snowing,  I drive it almost every day. It is a day driver in excellent condition." I asked for the valley pan cover numbers and he sent them to me. I then looked at the pictures closely and send him this text: "I noticed you have paper plates which expire Dec 2015, which tells me these pictures are from Sept 2015. Do you have any current pictures you can send me? I also noticed the rear tail light lenses are broken, there is one tail pipe instead of two, and your eBay listing, your engine bay picture, the right side of the engine is a different green than the left side. Did you buy it from a dealer? How is the headliner and how old are the tires, do you know?"

He comes back with this: "F@#$ you prick... Go find another car." I sent him a text back, "Classy, really classy, I see your parents raised you well... 

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1964-Buick-Other-Base-/273015756706?_trksid=p2047675.l2557&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&nma=true&si=LdJ8pGuYlMwqli8nqmocwVZ%2B4uE%3D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc

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Depends on how it is doing on eBay but there are 2 points  or 3. Texting and emailing is never as good as a conversation.  When you criticize the car in an email you have to show empathy or convey WHY you are being critical  

 

This guy has only owned the car 2 years. He probably does not know Wildcats had dual exhaust and one of the past owners likely went to single as an economy (cheaper) option.  

 

I think your questions are legitimate but it sounds like you bombarded him and he figured it was not worth it. 

 

The worst issue is remote location. I found it interesting that it garnered 39 bids and ended at a market correct $4600.  

 

 

 

Edited by Imperial62 (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, Imperial62 said:

Depends on how it is doing on eBay but there are 2 points  or 3. Texting and emailing is never as good as a conversation.  When you criticize the car in an email you have to show empathy or convey WHY you are being critical  

 

This guy has only owned the car 2 years. He probably does not know Wildcats had dual exhaust and one of the past owners likely went to single as an economy (cheaper) option.  

 

I think your your questions are legitimate but it sounds like you bombarded him and he figured it was not worth it 

I agree.  I DON'T agree with how he responded whatsoever, but at least a couple of those questions are ones best answered by yourself looking at the car, and can be frustrating when from the seller's end you are probably just someone else taking up time that isn't going to buy it.

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Ive sold some cars and you get guys who know way too much contacting you about them and it gets very frustrating. I was selling a used car my son-in-law bought and some guy wanted to know how often the oil was changed and when it had its last alignment. What???!?!? Who knows? It's a used car. It was a cheap car like this one.

 

Yes I get it but some guys just wont be happy with the car no matter what and asking all those questions is a good tipoff that they are complainers and nitpickers who never are happy with what they buy. I learned quick to politely turn them away (more politely than this guy thats for sure!!!). But yes you kind of earned it by asking passive/aggressive questions. Work up to it next time and built some rappore before you go all technical judging manual on them.

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Sorry, customer service sells.  No matter how aggressive or annoying the questions, a good salesman (or saleswoman) would not respond with profanity.  I've bought and sold plenty, and I get the annoyances of craigslist/ ebay, but I've never, and will never use such language with a potential customer, just poor etiquette. 

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The seller showed bad character by using

vulgar words like that.  After your 2nd or 3rd

round of penetrating questions, the seller 

should have said, "Just so there will be no

misunderstandings, I invite you to come and

see the car.  I don't have all the answers, but

I think if you come with reasonable expectations,

you'll like this original vehicle."

 

With such moderation, the two parties might have

made a deal, and maybe a new BCA member might

have signed up!

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11 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

The seller showed bad character by using

vulgar words like that.  After your 2nd or 3rd

round of penetrating questions, the seller 

should have said, "Just so there will be no

misunderstandings, I invite you to come and

see the car.  I don't have all the answers, but

I think if you come with reasonable expectations,

you'll like this original vehicle."

 

With such moderation, the two parties might have

made a deal, and maybe a new BCA member might

have signed up!

 

Buyers dont have reasonable expectations. Not anymore. not after watching the auctions on tv and all these shows. They show up to look at this car and get angry that they cant eat off the bottom of the car. For most buyers a car is either perfect or trash. They dont understand a nice clean car that can be driven but has rust on the bottom or on the engine and wear on the paint. That bit of knowledge and acceptance is disappearing from our hobby.

Edited by billorn (see edit history)

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A person that posts 2 year old pictures shows intent. Billings from Boise is two flights, BOI SLC and SLC BIL. Bill, iI bet you would be singing a different song if you spent a day to get there, or dove for 11 hrs to find a car full of dings and faded paint from parking outside, as he put it.  If you don't ask, you will never learn the truth with these guys... They can sell you the moon and the stars on the phone and when you get there, your jaw drops to the ground... Or you might have all the time in the world, as most old folks do and don't care taking 11 hrs road trips for no good reason, but I am not you. I couldn't care less about his response, because it was a text and reading "prick" to me means nothing. Now if he had said it to my face in person, he would have looked funny, trying to pick up his teeth with broken fingers.

I just thought it was funny this ad posted here and thought to let someone know of my experience with him. Lesson learned...

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I agree that there is no situation that warrants the response received here.

 

As a seller that posts on eBay and Craigslist, you need to understand that potential buyers that are long distance need a little extra work. Especially eBay where the car is almost always purchased without close in person inspection.

 

The money doesn't just fall in your lap when selling a car. That is why I don't understand someone posting a Craigslist ad and only posting a picture of two and not the 20 something aloud. Same on Ebay.

Edited by parkertom (see edit history)
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OK Buick People: Get this car to between 3-3500 and the drama goes away quickly, a new owner has a cool  'ol Bu and end of story.  Mitch

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While I would never, ever respond in such a manner, I have certainly explained to one or two people that I'm not interested in selling a car to them. Sometimes the deals just smell bad. An accusatory tone, nit-picking details that aren't really reasonably and commonly known, and other clues often tip me off that the guy making the inquiry is going to waste a lot of my time, demand a substantial discount for the "flaws," and that once he gets the car he will find more which, of course, will also be my problem and my responsibility. My response in these situations is usually, "I'm sorry, I don't think this is a good match. Best of luck in your search!" Some guys take it well, but most respond with similar profanity to that provided by the seller up above. They are unkind and vicious more often than not, as a matter of fact. I understand that car dealers are easy punching bags, but most guys don't take it well when people selling things don't dance when they say, "Dance!"

 

So I don't like what happened up above, but I get it. There are better responses but there are also better ways to approach the seller rather than simply kicking in the door and implying that the seller is pulling a fast one. That's exactly what happened to generate that unkind response--most people, me included, aren't experts on every detail of every car ever made. Expecting a seller to know details that you know isn't always reasonable. Some guys just own old cars without researching whether they used a yellow throttle spring on Tuesdays and a green one on Wednesdays and correcting that particular defect. Some guys just find an old car and enjoy it for a while, then sell it without knowing anything beyond where to pour the gas into it. Keeping that in mind when you open a dialogue can make things go more smoothly.

 

Some guys' money just isn't green enough and you've all met such people. It's not unique to the car world.

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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7 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

...most people, me included, aren't experts on every detail of every car ever made. Expecting a seller to know details that you know isn't always reasonable. Some guys just own old cars without researching whether they used a yellow throttle spring on Tuesdays and a green one on Wednesdays and correcting that particular defect.

 

Concur.  Some folks approach a transaction with a confrontational mindset, and their first salvo is not to acquire information, but to show that they know more than you.  You can generally tell within a couple of exchanges if that's what you're dealing with (repeated requests for specific pictures, questions about trivial aspects, focus on imperfections, etc.).  While the wording of my response to such a person would be considerably more diplomatic than the example above, the meaning would be the same.

 

And no, many don't take it well when you summarily end negotiations. :D

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