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alsancle

Brewster Bodies on Non-RR Chassis

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We all know that Brewster of NY put some great bodies on the Springfield RR.  How about some Brewster bodies on other chassis?   I'm thinking the most prolific would be the town cars they put on Ford V8.   RM is selling this ridiculously cool convertible sedan next month:

 

https://www.rmsothebys.com/en/auctions/AZ18/Arizona/lots/r234-1934-brewster-ford-convertible-sedan/620802

 

 

The car shown here was one of just nine Brewster-Ford convertible sedans built, and is one of four known survivors. It was originally delivered by J.S. Inskip to Hazleton Mirkil Jr., a prominent second-generation attorney and aviator from Philadelphia, on 18 February 1935. Mr. Mirkil’s personal issues led to the car’s sale that June by New York dealer Robert Schoonmaker to Arthur Knorr for $2,500. The car remained with Knorr and later his estate until September of 1999, when the estate’s contents were finally sold at auction. There the Brewster-Ford was acquired by only its third owner, respected New Jersey collector Thomas Kerr.

Neil Atley purchased the car from Kerr in 2007, becoming the fourth owner. Well maintained, the car retains all of its original finishes, including the factory paint, leather and broadcloth interior, and convertible top (which is still tight on its frame), and even the original spares in the fenders, which show some evidence of having been used on the ground at various points in the 1940s and 1950s! Only the batteries and tires have been replaced. It was noted recently that the car runs and drives very well, with the solid feel that can only be found in a well-maintained original automobile.

BrewsterConvSedan.jpg

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
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I would not have imagined a Brewster convertible sedan. Looks good in green.

 

There are at least 4 Brewster-bodied Peerlesses -- a 1910 Mod. 27 Landaulet in the Key Museum in Izmir, Turkey(ex-James Melton, Henry Austin Clark, William Donze, and Jack Tallman); a 1910 Mod. 27 Roadster at the Heritage Museums & Gardens, Sandwich, MA; the Doris Duke, James Melton, Sam Scher 1910 Mod. 29 Victoria Landau that has gone through 3 or 4 auctions in the last decade(where it wound up escapes me); and the 1911 Mod. 29 Victoria Landau at The Henry Ford.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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Brewster construction was the best in the business. Brunn was a close second. It’s amazing how many custom builders work we not that great. Factory construction was also all over the map. The best factory work I have ever seen was by Pierce. There were many good factory built bodies on other cars also, but if you ever dig into some of the more obscure cars and their bodies, it’s amazing how poorly some of it was done. Recently I was working on a Fleetwood 16, and we were marveling at how many pieces of wood they had used. Most of the other builders used fewer pieces, the Fleetwood body was solid as a rock, and the doors and seams were still where the factory put them. Brewster bodies on non Rolls Royce chassis were rather common until 1924, then it seems the Springfield Rolls Royce plant was frustrated with the quaility control and timely delivery of other body companies, and they purchased a controlling interest in the company. Springfield Metal Body company made a bunch of RR and other car company bodies, but they were not the quaility of Brewster. The later Ford Brewester cars were well done, and simple to service, and are very good drivers. I have seen a handful of Buick’s with their coachwork on 1930’s chassis. This probably only occurred after Inskip bought them out, as I am sure the Springfield Rolls Royce Company wouldn’t have allowed them to put their bodies on other chassis until after they lost control of the body works. If you get a chance, take a look at some of the horse drawn carriages they made. Also very impressive. Ed

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

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On 12/9/2017 at 9:13 AM, edinmass said:

Brewster construction was the best in the business. Brunn was a close second. It’s amazing how many custom builders work we not that great. Factory construction was also all over the map. The best factory work I have ever seen was by Pierce. There were many good factory built bodies on other cars also, but if you ever dig into some of the more obscure cars and their bodies, it’s amazing how poorly some of it was done. Recently I was working on a Fleetwood 16, and we were marveling at how many pieces of wood they had used. Most of the other builders used fewer pieces, the Fleetwood body was solid as a rock, and the doors and seams were still where the factory put them. Brewster bodies on non Rolls Royce chassis were rather common until 1924, then it seems the Springfield Rolls Royce plant was frustrated with the quaility control and timely delivery of other body companies, and they purchased a controlling interest in the company. Springfield Metal Body company made a bunch of RR and other car company bodies, but they were not the quaility of Brewster. The later Ford Brewester cars were well done, and simple to service, and are very good drivers. I have seen a handful of Buick’s with their coachwork on 1930’s chassis. This probably only occurred after Inskip bought them out, as I am sure the Springfield Rolls Royce Company wouldn’t have allowed them to put their bodies on other chassis until after they lost control of the body works. If you get a chance, take a look at some of the horse drawn carriages they made. Also very impressive. Ed

When you close the door on a Brewster bodied car - it the a sound that makes your heart sing !  And, totally silent on the road - no squeaks, no rattles, and ..... Beautiful German Silver fittings, Mahogany trim, and ....

 

By the way:  I am restoring a Bohman & Schwartz bodied car - lots of wood (and it had a mix of oak, ash, and what I think is Apple) and incredibly intricate woodwork structure , ok fit but nothing to write home about, some incredibly high quality and some questionable construction techniques, appears to have had extra bracing added after built to strengthen it, and ... matched to great bronze casting work, stunning upholstery work, and ....   I often hear:  "You must love working on hand built car" and my reply is the quality is mostly in the paint, chrome, interior, and casting work.

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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In 1958 or so there was a Brewster-bodied roadster near Memphis, TN. As best i recall, it was mounted on a Ford chassis and running gear. Has this car ever shown up in the collector circles? Sorry, no photo was taken at the time.

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William Brewster´s 1928 Packard 4-43 Shortened Wheelbase Formal Sedan

ebay149213093896421.jpg

photo: Significant Cars of Indianapolis

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1910 Peerless Model 27 Landaulet, Body by Brewster. Ex-Melton, Clark, Donze, & Tallman. Now in the Key Museum. I have a letter Jack Tallman wrote me saying ¨...it is the ultimate Brass Car¨. The Key Museum is in Izmir, Turkey and has everything from a BMW Isetta to Auburn, a Wedgewood Blue Buick, Cadillac, De Dion Bouton, Lamborghini, Mercedes-Benz, Pierce-Arrow, and Rolls-Royce. 

4519065113_dc48832191_z.jpg

photo: flickriver and flickr

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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