automaschinewerks

28 studebaker dictator finally came home

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Losing your mind is a requirement for restoring these old cars. What parent ever understands the next generation?  Your dad just hasn’t been bitten by the bug, so you have to get him involved in the rebuild. 

Looking forward to the build thread pics. Have fun 

Dave S 

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Are both cars the same model? They look like second series GEs. Even if they  re the same you may find detail differences in them. The parts car looks to have the under dash parking brake. I think third series models was the first with the floor lever brake.

 

The serial number on the plate attached to the left chassis rail behind the front wheel will tell you more.

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nz, neither the good frame or the parts frame had the serial number plate, I should message white glove and see if there were any stude plates left, all I have is the body number on both the good car and the parts cowl.

dave s. I was just joking, dad wants to stop around and pick up an old truck and car to fix up when he slows down.  right now when he leaves on a trip he'll stay out for 5,6,7 weeks before he gets a load to come back to Ontario.

On ‎11‎/‎25‎/‎2017 at 2:35 PM, nzcarnerd said:

Are both cars the same model? They look like second series GEs. Even if they  re the same you may find detail differences in them. The parts car looks to have the under dash parking brake. I think third series models was the first with the floor lever brake.

 

The serial number on the plate attached to the left chassis rail behind the front wheel will tell you more.

also the parts cowl has chrome trim mounted cowl lamps, not the little ones right near the windshield base. does that tell me something about the series?

On ‎11‎/‎25‎/‎2017 at 12:30 PM, SC38DLS said:

Losing your mind is a requirement for restoring these old cars. What parent ever understands the next generation?  Your dad just hasn’t been bitten by the bug, so you have to get him involved in the rebuild. 

Looking forward to the build thread pics. Have fun 

Dave S 

 

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6 hours ago, automaschinewerks said:

nz, neither the good frame or the parts frame had the serial number plate, I should message white glove and see if there were any stude plates left, all I have is the body number on both the good car and the parts cowl.

dave s. I was just joking, dad wants to stop around and pick up an old truck and car to fix up when he slows down.  right now when he leaves on a trip he'll stay out for 5,6,7 weeks before he gets a load to come back to Ontario.

also the parts cowl has chrome trim mounted cowl lamps, not the little ones right near the windshield base. does that tell me something about the series?

 

The car with the later style cowl lamps will be later production but with out the serial number it won't be easy. If you have the engines there will be casting dates.  The first letter denotes the year.

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Actually the larger chrome running lights were introduced on the Royal (higher optioned) model ge dictators while the standard models were still using the acorn style running lights. If the  parts car is a type 2 sedan but has the chrome larger running lights it is a royal model. I will attach an image showing the type 2 sedans regular and royal from the 1928 Studebaker sales brochure.dictatortypes007.thumb.jpg.26d8bb8ff5ca9e9b2ba0885bf109e35a.jpg

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here are some pics of the engine,  a not so good pic of the engine and spare on the skid for a before pic,  and a few pics after  a few hard rounds with oven cleaner and brushes,  painted and in the test stand, and with trans mounted

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harry, the test stand lets me spin the engine once I get the bottom end assembled with oil pan, filled with oil and filter.  I can then spin engine and check oil pressure.  then I install head(s), spin some more and check compression.   spin for awhile and I get an idea of oil leaks (or hopefully lack thereof!).  because oil pressure is primed and lifters filled on newer engines, I can set rockers, install valve covers and engine is ready to drop in.  my former boss' father made this stand in the late forties when he was rebuilding a lot of Babbitt engines.  it originally is for running in the Babbitt bearings, but every engine we rebuilt goes on this stand to test oil pressure, compression, leaks, noise, etc.  in books like dykes automobile encyclopedia, where they show sample floor plans for your shop, it shows in the overhaul section a 'burnishing-in stand', and that was for running in the new Babbitt.

I put the dictator engine on because it was out of car when I bought the project.  I wanted to clean the oil pan, put in fresh oil and spin it to check oil pressure and compression, to decide whether I was pulling it apart before I put it in the car.  doing the test stand thing without running it under its own power, is easier to listen for foreign noises that shouldn't be there before I go too far with it and wreck something.

other than that big speech, the idea behind using the test stand is because I have it, I guess.

thanks for the question - terry

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That engine spin stand is pretty neat Terry. I'm impressed that you go to those lengths on the engines your shop builds - you don't find that type of dedication to doing things right too much these days.

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On ‎1‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 7:02 AM, automaschinewerks said:

harry, the test stand lets me spin the engine once I get the bottom end assembled with oil pan, filled with oil and filter.  I can then spin engine and check oil pressure.  then I install head(s), spin some more and check compression.   spin for awhile and I get an idea of oil leaks (or hopefully lack thereof!).  because oil pressure is primed and lifters filled on newer engines, I can set rockers, install valve covers and engine is ready to drop in.  my former boss' father made this stand in the late forties when he was rebuilding a lot of Babbitt engines.  it originally is for running in the Babbitt bearings, but every engine we rebuilt goes on this stand to test oil pressure, compression, leaks, noise, etc.  in books like dykes automobile encyclopedia, where they show sample floor plans for your shop, it shows in the overhaul section a 'burnishing-in stand', and that was for running in the new Babbitt.

I put the dictator engine on because it was out of car when I bought the project.  I wanted to clean the oil pan, put in fresh oil and spin it to check oil pressure and compression, to decide whether I was pulling it apart before I put it in the car.  doing the test stand thing without running it under its own power, is easier to listen for foreign noises that shouldn't be there before I go too far with it and wreck something.

other than that big speech, the idea behind using the test stand is because I have it, I guess.

thanks for the question - terry

Looking Good, Terry.

 

1927 Studebaker Babbitt  pictures.

 

1939 Nash Rods.

 

1923 Aluminum Air Cooled Franklin Rods, and Mains.

 

1928 Chevy  Mains.

 

 

 

 

1927 Studabaker 6 005.jpg

1927 Studabaker 6 006.jpg

1927 Studabaker 6 008.jpg

1927 Studabaker 6 010.jpg

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1927 Studabaker 6 016.jpg

1927 Studabaker 6 017.jpg

1927 Studabaker 6 018.jpg

1927 Studabaker 6 019.jpg

Nash Rods, 1939 001.jpg

Nash Rods, 1939 002.jpg

Nash Rods, 1939 003.jpg

Nash Rods, 1939 005.jpg

Nash Rods, 1939 006.jpg

Nash Rods, 1939 010.jpg

1923 Aluminum Rods, and Mains, out of an Air Cooled Franklin Car 002.jpg

1923 Aluminum Rods, and Mains, out of an Air Cooled Franklin Car 008.jpg

1923 Aluminum Rods, and Mains, out of an Air Cooled Franklin Car 010.jpg

1923 Aluminum Rods, and Mains, out of an Air Cooled Franklin Car 018.jpg

1923 Aluminum Rods, and Mains, out of an Air Cooled Franklin Car 022.jpg

1923 Aluminum Rods, and Mains, out of an Air Cooled Franklin Car 024.jpg

1923 Aluminum Rods, and Mains, out of an Air Cooled Franklin Car 025.jpg

1927 Aluminum Rods, and Mains, Franklin 002.jpg

1927 Aluminum Rods, and Mains, Franklin 005.jpg

1927 Aluminum Rods, and Mains, Franklin 009.jpg

1927 Aluminum Rods, and Mains, Franklin 010.jpg

1923 Aluminum Mains out of a Air Cooled Franklin Car No 2 001 - Copy.jpg

1923 Aluminum Mains out of a Air Cooled Franklin Car No 2 002 - Copy.jpg

1923 Aluminum Mains out of a Air Cooled Franklin Car No 2 003 - Copy.jpg

1923 Aluminum Mains out of a Air Cooled Franklin Car No 2 004.jpg

Chev. Four Inserts 001.jpg

Chev. Four Inserts 003.jpg

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