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ID old truck. Bought old photo album... more pix coming

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Hello gang. I went to an estate sale recently, with the relatives conducting the sale. I couldn't believe they wanted to sell old photo albums full of family pictures, but that's their business, not mine. Anyway, I bought one album because it had several cool old photos of cars and/or other vintage vehicles. Tonight I'll post an image of a very old truck that I thought was very cool.

 

Anyone have any idea about the make/year/model of this old solid-rubber-tire stake bed truck? 

 

Truck VERY old unknown Elgin Illinois.jpg

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Wow, this is one of VERY few times I've seen this group of sharp car collectors stumped on an old vehicle. This must be a really tough one. 

I note that the radiator shell shape reminds me of Model T Ford, but looks too large for this to be a TT. Seems to be chain drive...at least that small wheel in front of the rear wheel looks like a sprocket to me. Other ideas at all? 

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OK.  I'll bite.:) Definitely not a TT. Not a Mack either although it is chain drive and the brake appears to be in the housing in front of the rear wheel which is typical of Mack.  Haven't found anything yet with that radiator shape.

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There were probably nearly as many different truck makers as car makers in that early era - and there were hundreds of makes of cars. Most truck of that time had a cast radiator top tank with the maker's name cast into it. This one is unusual in not having that feature. The location Elgin, Illinois might be a start in searching for the make, as like cars some makes only sold in the local area. I would guess the date at WW1 era.

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Initially agreed with nzcarnerd about WW1 era, but on taking another look I think this truck may date from the early '20's.  It has electric lights.  Even in the  early/middle '20's many trucks still only had kerosene lamps because they were slow - maybe 20 mph tops - and seldom driven at night.  

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You could be right. Of course the truck may have been updated with later parts so we will probably never be certain. Some models had long production runs - the Mack AC for example.

 

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