NCRiviera

Any reputable pot metal restorers out there?

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I am looking for a reputable person or company that can restore chromed pot metal trim parts (specifically 1968 Riviera tail light bezels). Someone who can remove the old chrome, remove the bubbles and pits, smooth the surfaces and re-chrome the parts. Job quality is important. 

Edited by NCRiviera (see edit history)

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I was given the name of a company that I was told did very good work.

 

JR Custom Plating

39374 Grand Ave

North Branch, MN 55056

Johnny 651-464-0761

 

I was told he would do the tail light bezels for my ’72 for right around $300 each. That included taking care of some pits and doing the chrome.

 

I have not tried them yet but the guy I got the info from is very particular, so I’m sure they do good work.

 

You might give them a call and see what they have to say?

 

Good luck with your search,

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Iverson Automotive - Minnetonka, MN . Advertises in Hemmins every month.  Not cheap but excellent work . Pot metal is specialty . 

KReed

ROA 14549

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R&D Finishing in Elizabethton, Tennessee just did some pot metal parts for me, kept the detail and a beautiful job.  The old adage you get what you pay for applies strongly to chrome plating....

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On ‎11‎/‎7‎/‎2017 at 11:51 PM, kreed said:

Iverson Automotive - Minnetonka, MN . Advertises in Hemmins every month.  Not cheap but excellent work . Pot metal is specialty . 

KReed

ROA 14549

Indeed, I'm going with Iverson for my console resto. this winter.

By the time you do all the silver fill and then copper fill yourself - you still need to do the chrome and although it might be fun it might not be worth the tooling/chem. cost.

Doubt I'll do 3 layers of chrome. $$$$

Great article here:

 

http://www.iversonautomotive.com/Services/Types/Potmetal

 

 

 

 

Edited by PWB (see edit history)

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For those of you who are a little more daring, here's a video featuring "Muggy weld" in which some pot metal restoration is shown.  You'd still need to have the plating done.  

 

https://www.muggyweld.com/video/repair-pot-metal-pitting/

 

This link shows other repairs to pot metal pieces

 

www.muggyweld.com/knowledge-center/#pot-metal

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10 hours ago, PWB said:

 

Interesting read for sure!

 

This is kind of unrelated but I thought I would post it anyway.

 

While I was there I went ahead and read a few of their other articles and found an interesting tid-bit, to me anyway, besides lots of info about their refinishing process.

 

Under their “Services” tab, hover on “Types”, click on “New Old Stock”.

 

I’ll quote some info from it that caught my eye …

 

For many car buffs, NOS (New Old Stock or New Original Stock) is the Holy Grail of auto trim. To those of this school of thought, I apologize for the following critical assessment. While it can be the finest solution to finding or replacing a part, extreme caution must be used. NOS parts are often factory seconds, and like all automotive parts, they are made by a range of suppliers. There is no guarantee that an NOS part will provide a proper fit, even if it is in its original packaging. As owner and operator of a stainless, aluminum, and pot metal restoration shop, I have a straightforward point to make: when restoring, use the part on your car whenever possible.

 

As a youngster, I visited the Ford plant to see how the 1957 line was built. When they worked on trim, a piece was selected from a bin, briefly examined, and attached to a fender or door. If the piece did not fit correctly or attach easily, it was tossed into a reject bin. There is your NOS part.

 

You can read the complete NOS explanation from Iverson Automotive here …

 

Iverson Automotive … New Old Stock (NOS)

 

Just thought I would share,

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When searching to have my original tail light bezels done, the platter advised me to try and get a better example or NOS, as repros were not available, and it was going to be expensive to have the original, pitted versions reworked and re-chromed. I was fortunate to track down one, left side, NOS at $50 US, and I settled for a pristine, 'USED version for the right side.

No matter whichever platter you may choose, it will be expensive because of all the prep work involved prior to chrome platting to restore your originals !

The design of the original '68/'69 bezels with all those raised flutes on the lower surface, also makes for a restoration nightmare !

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2 hours ago, Pat Curran said:

Not to mention the frost finish between the flutes!!

I believe the "frost" finish is easily obtained by masking off with two layers of metal foil tape and using plastic media blast.

 

We used it in the military. The foil tape holds up very well under lower PSI -  via hand blast.

 

I'll bet soda works just as well?

 

 

 

 

Edited by PWB (see edit history)

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3 hours ago, Pat Curran said:

Not to mention the frost finish between the flutes!!

 

That frosted finish look was simply painted on, with a matt finish paint Pat - aged, older bezels where the paint has worn off is smooth chrome like the rest of the bezel. 

Because I had one NOS, and one pristine original that was faded, and missing some paint between the flutes, I refinished both bezels, and colour matched them to the car for a mild custom look.

I could not match the colour on the NOS bezel, which was a matt, warm grey, so I used a matching cool, flat, medium gay which was closer to the car color.

They took about 2 hours each to prep and mask, and roughly 10 minutes with a rattle can to refinish !

Not exactly original, but hey, it's my car ! LOL :rolleyes:

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Am I correct or wrong in thinking that the '66 and '67 hood spears are the same except one year is "frosted" and the other year is plain?  

 

If anyone is in need of a "frosted" one, I have one that has no pits in it and the "frosting" is not impaired in any way.  BUT, it has two missing mounting studs. It's exceptional except for the missing studs.

 

If you're interested, let me know.

 

Ed

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3 hours ago, RivNut said:

Am I correct or wrong in thinking that the '66 and '67 hood spears are the same except one year is "frosted" and the other year is plain?  

 

If anyone is in need of a "frosted" one, I have one that has no pits in it and the "frosting" is not impaired in any way.  BUT, it has two missing mounting studs. It's exceptional except for the missing studs.

 

If you're interested, let me know.

 

Ed

The spear can be stud welded. A larger weld store may rent the stud gun. I'd practice on a beat up one to get the amperage right.

A ROA member had his '66 spear "re-frosted" at a chrome shop. It was not paint. Quite impressive seeing it in person.

My last two '67's had no frost. I wish they did. I'll do it if ever re-chromed. 

Something only a Riviera owner would appreciate.

The wife don't get it, even though she owns half?

 

Edited by PWB (see edit history)

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