sligermachine

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MY NEW TRUCK JUST SHOWED UP LONG RIDE TO GET IT HERE . 1939 FORD NOW TO MAKE A NICE WAY TO HAUL THE 1925 BUICK  . IF I COULD HAVE FOUND A BUICK TRUCK IT WOULD BE HERE . THANKS FRANK .

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On 11/6/2017 at 7:53 PM, sligermachine said:

just mad at my self for sale my 1929 ford truck I loved that thing 6 years to make 2 min. to sale 

That is why I just bought this new truck 1939 is new to me my last Ford truck I built was 6 years of free time ! I don't want to do over .I am looking forword to using this truck to pull my 1925 Buick to car shows I would like to drive it to some as well but the show in Colorado is a long drive for a car that is so hard to find parts for .On the other hand I can find a few spare parts for this truck and its V8 . It is a real clean 1939 rig . 

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So I disassembled all the wood frame to replace all the wood screws with the original painted hardware it is much to cheek fit with Phillips screws  with a power driver but the stander head ones have to be put in by hand to push hard  .at least at the end when it gets real hard. wile I was doing this the door openings changed shape just by 1/4 at the top so now I am backing up and moving some stuff at least I cough it before I nailed the body on but that is what part I am up too . My lift on the right side of my shop now has my other  sons rock crawler on it so all car projects had to be packed up and moved but it is a lot funner to have my kids work on there rock crawlers wile I slowly put my 1925 master roadster together --one inch at a time --kyle

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Edited by sligermachine (see edit history)
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The blue tape is to remind my self of what is next to do .I have learned to do this at my machine shop so I don't spend 10 or 20 min just looking at a part wondering where i left off .I would call it next action plan do what tape says to do . this trick saves me lots of time . --kyle

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5 hours ago, sligermachine said:

The blue tape is to remind my self of what is next to do .I have learned to do this at my machine shop so I don't spend 10 or 20 min just looking at a part wondering where i left off .I would call it next action plan do what tape says to do . this trick saves me lots of time . --kyle

 

Great idea. Thanks for sharing that tidbit. 

 

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well today I took   a little off the post and it looks like the door fits premo now time to nail the body to the wood frame . allmost time for paint and body so cool !!!! -kyle 

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This is the first time the doors are on their hinges and aligned  after all the wood is tight in place with tons of wood screws . I must have took this frame a part 6 times to keep changing the finale fit but I am happy with it both doors line up like rolling off the show room floor .Now I can appreciate a --PRE WAR --  Buick like no ones business .I am glad GOD blessed me with lots of patience.

  The top Irons are on to see how their going to fit . This 1925  MASTER ROADSTER  is going to have 2 tops hard top and soft top   

                                                                                                 ONE INCH AT A TIME     -kyle 

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Kyle:

 Found this on ebay. It does show a 1925 Master Roadster and what the top fit looks like with side curtains.

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The one door that I have was glued at the corners .so the last step on the 4 frame parts are done now glued at only the corners the block that held the door latch had 4 big nails but no sign of glue so I will finish it the way I found it now nailing it to the wood frame should be no big problem I like how the doors fit and happy I am finely past that point. I used epoxy. The leather trim part that goes over the wood is going to hide my nice wood work .you'll still be able to see the inside wood work of the doors some . what a long way I have come .As far as I have herd most Buick's don't make it back on the road after the doors are sagging well I know why now it is a lot of effort But I think well worth it . I am real glad I have 2 more that need the wood kits made by the time I finish the 3rd one I will be rely fast at doors practice makes perfect !!  --kyle

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On 6/3/2018 at 6:45 AM, dibarlaw said:

top fit looks like with side curtains.

looks like made to fold down a little bit to . Any one have a close up I could see?? 

I'm going to order the black leather tomorrow Trimacar   I hope is going to let me know how much to get .

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On 6/3/2018 at 6:10 AM, dibarlaw said:

know you are just fitting up at this time. The seams for the top sockets will go on the inside.

the bows are going to take A min to make . that might be the first part of a restored car I ever had anyone help me with . like sub it out .any good suggestions on who I  should use .!!

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The glue bonded really nice I always make a test sample of like material that is  guled together wile I glue stuff so I can test the bond the wood broke not the glue .Good job. 915034247_20180605_182526_HDR-11.jpg.978cc94008e049fb23a50cdeda1f86d8.jpg926909299_20180605_183020_HDR-11.jpg.f1a9f041e18f561239c099c51f4e5fc1.jpg

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I covered the whole  joint inside and out both sides.now to grind the over flow off and take them to the machine shop to draw in cad to study the shape of the door .I only need one door to study I did not want to lose the shape of any part I fill like the door frame could be made in one fail swoop if done just right I think I have over a 100 hr in this set of doors and would not wont to lose out on the real shape of the wood now . If this part makes no sense  to you it is so I can study the wood joints in a computer to see a fast way to make them latter .make 4 tight cuts to build a square super tight set it down on a jig push start   and wallah  1.7 hr later a door is shaped by a 4 axis cnc . with joints so tight you would think it is glued but nothing is holding it at all but a perfect fit wood joint .well in a perfect world any way .If I can find time to play most of the time I keep 7 to 8 machines running at my shop .Never have i seen a slow year thank God . He is alway good to me . --kyle

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Kyle:

I thought that I sent this out yesterday but probably forgot to hit submit.

 The place for steam bent top bows is in my town of Chambersburg, PA. Rick Kesselring. He only does calls or letters for contact. His shop is about a mile from my home.

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Edited by dibarlaw (see edit history)
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Man I don't think I going to make it with my car this year Dang . I will go to the Colorado but my car don't think going to make it .wow cool I will call today .thank you very much . 

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The Real fun is almost here hung it after I took the pic. finely drilled out the holes and installed the original hardware that was in the door when 15787088_20180607_001428_HDR-11.jpg.73bcf45568b4df108959c14f36c9e42b.jpgthe car was built. I was trying not to scratch it up real bad . out of room for pic.tonight though . --kyle ---one inch at a time !! 

Edited by sligermachine (see edit history)

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Kyle

You have both 1924 and 1925 style door latches pictured.  Buick Master changed to a "modern" style inside door handle in 1925 and eliminated the vertical lever. Check your parts to see if you have the driver side 1925 latch without the handle sticking up. If you don't have one, just cut the handle off the 1924 latch to convert it. Inside & outside door handle is pictured below.

Body sheetmetal at upper corners of the door openings were originally filled in with body solder or lead. To give the lead something to adhere to, a piece of copper foil was nailed to the wood at these corners, and the sheetmetal would have been freshly cleaned and was probably tinned before the sheetmetal was attached to the wood. The original lead probably stays in place unless the original wood is removed, which is the case for your car and mine too.   Its probably too late to be adding any lead now, so another solution will be needed.

Is there an epoxy that would remain slightly flexible that can be squeezed into the voids to finish these corners ?

 

kevin

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Kyle, 

      These are what the corners that you are missing look like.  They were actually steel and the metal was held with 1 nail on the top of the wood post.  Then they leaded it in.  Interesting that in this picture, the plate looks like a heavy piece of lead.  Interesting not to see any rust on the piece.  These days  you would just wire feed weld a piece of sheetmetal  formed to fit as best as you can and then use a good body filler to shape the surface.   Hugh

 

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that's tin plating on that inside corner part so the body solder will stick.  I saw some copper stuck to one of my corner pieces, so assumed it was the material they were using.

The body sheetmetal still needs to be freshly cleaned underneath that joint so the solder will flow and fill up the cracks.

 

kevin

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