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Time to get the clock working on 67 Riv. It seems the options are

- have the old one rebuilt back to original specs . Doubtful I want to got this route.

- send the old one out to be converted to Quartz.  Not bad idea; 2 week turn around, or thereabouts

- find dealer who will sell me a quartz clock that looks like the original, without having to send the old one out. Seem easiest of all.

Does anyone have any advice? In the Services section of the Riview I see some outfits that "restore" clocks. Does any just 'sell" them?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Rocky,

if the clock is electro mechanical, then they are repairable. Possibly be a Borg unit. This type uses a solenoid to rewind a mechanical Spring. Often the contacts are dirty and the clock needs a clean and lubrication, nothing more. Usually when they stop, they are left so there is not much wear. You will find some posts of mine if you search here. I got my '63 clock working sweetly and keeping ok time too. There is a post also on the Internet to find which describes the clock and how you repair them. Google Borg clock repair. Good luck, keep us posted 😀😀😀

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How easy is it to even get to the clock to remove it (1st Gen cars)?

 

Does the entire dash have to be disassembled?

 

What kind of prices have you gotten for converting it to quartz?

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Instrument Services will sell you a quartz kit and you can rebuild yourself. No one straight out sells rebuilt clocks for the 66-67. 

If your clock face happens to need a cosmetic resto it might be best to send it out or get  a good replacement and install a quartz kit yourself. 

 

I do love the nostalgia of old electromechanical clocks when they are operating. Unfortunately it’s not a robust design for something that runs 24 hrs day. 

 

As for the speedo buzzer check the big Chevy and Corvette aftermarket suppliers. They might have them. Make certain the buzzer is the problem. The hair spring contact in the speedo is notoriously at fault. Same trigger system is used for cruise control 

 

Edited by JZRIV (see edit history)
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I have a few 1st. gen clocks sitting around as I'm sure many others have in the ROA. One of us could rebuild one & convert it to a Quartz movement for a fee paid in advance. As far as removing it's got to be one of the simplist things to do on a 1st. gen. Grab & turn to the left. dis-connect wires, done. If it WON'T come out or turn do a search on this forum for an explanation.

 

 

Tom T.

 

 

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1 hour ago, telriv said:

I have a few 1st. gen clocks sitting around as I'm sure many others have in the ROA. One of us could rebuild one & convert it to a Quartz movement for a fee paid in advance. As far as removing it's got to be one of the simplist things to do on a 1st. gen. Grab & turn to the left. dis-connect wires, done. If it WON'T come out or turn do a search on this forum for an explanation.

 

 

Tom T.

 

 

The quartz clocks are noisy. wrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

Disconnect the hot lead under the dash and check for continuity thru the clock.

If its good you more than likely need only a clean and lube.

Getting the clock out is the scary part. Radio and duct has to be moved unless you have mad skill skeleton arms.

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Thanks once again to all. I think I'll pull it out and try to clean it up, then go from there. I have a battery disconnect, so when I use it, I'd have to re-set the clock every time. I assume the quartz clocks are the same, unless they have a magic source of power?

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4 hours ago, telriv said:

I have a few 1st. gen clocks sitting around as I'm sure many others have in the ROA. One of us could rebuild one & convert it to a Quartz movement for a fee paid in advance. As far as removing it's got to be one of the simplist things to do on a 1st. gen. Grab & turn to the left. dis-connect wires, done. If it WON'T come out or turn do a search on this forum for an explanation.

 

 

Tom T.

 

What would something like that cost for my '65?

 

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If you're having problems with a clock in a 1st generation Riviera, the first thing you'll want to do is go back to post #3 in this thread and re-read it.  It's really a pretty simple DIY fix.  If you can get the clock out, you can fix it.  If you can't get the clock out, go back and re-read Tom's post #6 in this thread.  The videos referenced seem to run on a bit but all you're trying to do is clean the gears and make sure that the points are in good condition.

 

These clocks are mechanical.  They run off of a main spring.  The main spring is wound with a very quick jolt from a 12V source - your cars battery.  When the points close and allow the 12V to wind the main spring, the clock will run until the main spring runs down. The points are connected to the main spring.  The main spring runs down, the points make contact, and the main spring is wound again.  This cycle just keeps repeating itself over and over.

 

Tom's reference to remove the clock tells you how to get a better grip on the clock bezel.  

 

Once you've cleaned the year's accumulation of dirt from the gears, and have filed the points down, you can manually depress the points arm to wind the main spring.  The clock should start running and continue until the main spring runs down.  If it doesn't start, hold the clock in your hand with the face in your palm.  Then rapidly twist your wrist back and forth a number of times to get the gears moving.  Once they move on their own, you're good to go.

 

 You'll need to remove the cover from around the clock. There are some small Phillips head screws that hold the cover on. Should you need to remove the bezel, you'll need to remove the winder from the stem.  With a very small pair of needle nose pliers, grab the stem behind the face of the clock.  You can then unscrew the knob from the stem.

 

When you first get the clock loose, you'll need to take the wires off. One wire is for the lamp. One wire is your 12V source. Make sure the 12 wire doesn't come in contact with something that will ground it. You'll create a short and blow a fuse. Have fun.

 

Ed

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On 11/3/2017 at 8:42 AM, Pat Curran said:

I did a quartz conversion on my 69 and it was silent with no noise at all.

Ditto for my 1969 Chevrolet Caprice clock conversion to quartz movement. Silent and accurate with a much lower drain on your battery. If you follow Instrument Services instructions you will have no problem converting your clock to quartz movement. Just be very gentle with the clock arms as they are very delicate and can be easily bent . 

Edited by NCRiviera (see edit history)
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I have to admit...I love the quiet little click the clock on my 63 makes when the battery rewinds the main spring. All the other cars in my garage are quiet and never make any noise when parked. I had my 63 for years (before I pulled the clock, cleaned it, painted the arms and bezel) and the clock never worked so I never heard it. Now, whenever I hear that little click it's a small reminder of a task successfully completed. IMHO, if you can get the old clock to work...do it...it's rewarding. PRL

 

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After reading this thread I was inspired to try to get the inoperative clock in the Aqua Zephyr running. 

After removing the clock I took the back off and wound the main spring and found the unit would not operate. I shot a very light coating of silicone lubricant on the gears. It immediately started functioning. 

I let the main spring wind down then rewound the main spring a few more times. 

After confirming the clock mechanism is functional I plugged it back on to the wiring harness. It immediately activated the arming switch. I watched it through a couple of rewind cycles to verify it is fully functional again. 

Thanks to everyone for the excellent information that saved me about $82 (for a quartz movement). 

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