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Joseph P. Indusi

Cannot find water pump lube and anti-rust additive

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In the past, whenever I flushed the cooling system and renewed the antifreeze mixture, I always added a can of water pump lubricant.   Major parts suppliers do not stock it any longer.  Is there anything like this available today or are the new antifreeze formulations such that it is no longer needed?   I know GM used to sell a water pump lubricant in a can to add to the radiator.

Joe, BCA 33493

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I use Pencool, a big rig additive formerly known as Nal-Cool, which has anti-corrosion, water pump lube, and anti-cavitation properties.  It comes in two varieties. Pencool 2000 for NO antifreeze (I don't need antifreeze in my climate, and antifreeze foams in my unpressurized systems, forcing water out at speed), and Pencool 3000 (for any amount, even less than 50%, of anti-freeze).  Best price, and easiest place to find, is on Amazon.  I find the most convenient package size is the 64 oz (half-gallon) jug.  Initial dosage is 1 oz per quart of cooling system capacity, and a lesser topoff/replacement dose.  However, since my cars' unpressurized systems (all except the 4 psi Jeepster) use some coolant, I top off with 4 oz of Pencool in a gallon jug of water.  My systems remain clean with this product, which I've been using for well over a decade. A couple of years ago I confirmed the type application with a chemist at Penray Corp., the manufacturer.

 

Hastings Cool and certain others say on their websites, if not on the container, that they are NOT recommended  for use in unpressurized systems.

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I'm thinking the older style Bars Leak additive has a water pump lube function, due to its soluable oil composition?  I think it's still around.  Maybe even something in Prestone?

 

NTX5467

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I too was having problems finding the water pump lube/antirust, and found it on Ebay and purchased enough for a couple years.  I will look into the Pencool.

Never heard the statement about antifreeze foaming in a non-pressurized system.

My 1939 is the last year of a non-pressurized Buick and running 50-50 I have not seen "foaming"

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I asked about the water pump lube because I heard a squeaking sound that turned out to be the fan belt.   Rubbed the side of the belt with a candle and it quieted down.   So now not sure if I need the water pump lube... Does it really lube the pump?   I always thought so but why do none of the parts stores carry it in stock anymore?

Joe, BCA 33493

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The water pump shaft bearings are outside of the coolant area, behind at least one seal, I believe.  "Oil" stops "rust", usually.  Perhaps that's the reason for "lube"?

 

I suspect that "foam" is more a function of the coolant's make-up than not.  Reason I say that is that back in the later 1960s, the service station we used was run by a former dealership mechanic we'd followed to each service station he'd run/owned.  One afternoon, a TX DPS car was brought by for him to look at.  The hood was up and I saw a "contraption" with a glass sight window on it, in the radiator hose.  He said that was so they could see what the coolant level was without taking the cap off.  

 

He laughed and said one year, they bought a certain brand of (very inexpensive) antifreeze and all it would do was foam.  I shook my head as I knew these cars had to be dependable in all manner of situations, which foamed coolant would not help happen.

 

I suspect that an impeller-style water pump will generate less foam in the coolant than other styles of pumps.

 

NTX5467

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