kep1113

1956 Buick Special hesitation issue

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Shop manual shows that hole on the side open. It could possibly be an air bleed to fine tune the mixture.

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Here are some follow up pictures to my earlier post about the hole in the side of the carb.  In the first picture, the large hole near the top is where the pump arm and metering rod arm are located.  I assume this is OK to be open since the cover that goes on top of this assembly is simply titled "Dust Cover".  The other hole toward the middle is the one I was wondering about earlier.  After further reading, it sound like this may be an air bleed to prevent suction in the carb from pulling out gas that is in the accelerator pump assembly.  Apparently there is one on each side of the carb..... which leads to the second picture.  The same hole on this side appears to be plugged!  I've looked through all the literature I can find but nothing seems to help.  Any ideas?   Thanks in advance!!

carb1.jpg

carb2.jpg

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The one on the Choke side appears to be right into a passage as opposed to the one on the linkage side.  It also looks like a factory plug on the choke side hole, so I would think it was meant to be that way.

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Hi everyone, after a long while I'm happy to report that my son's Buick is alive and well.  I wish I could report back on what the exact problem was, but we wound up putting it in a shop that does a lot of work on old cars and they found many things that were contributing to the problems.  I think the primary thing was they knew how to properly adjust the carburetor and we didn't!  After the hesitation issue was corrected, it began cutting off after a few minutes of driving.  Replacing distributor components and the proper installation of an electric fuel pump solved those issues.

 

So, I have one more question..... is there a relatively easy way to fix an exhaust manifold leak?  It's not a leaky gasket, but a very small hole in the manifold itself.  We've tried two-part epoxy "steel" products, but they can't take the heat. Do we have to remove the manifold and take it to a shop?

 

Thanks again for all the replies!

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2 hours ago, kep1113 said:

Do we have to remove the manifold and take it to a shop?

Yes, but instead of fixing, find a replacement.

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There are many 322 guru's out there and they will tell you "do not use gaskets on the manifold". My understanding is that the heads and manifolds were made of very good quality and machining was precise. Not saying that gaskets can't be used but again the guru's says using gaskets can cause the manifold to crack. Centerville Auto Repair & Vintage Hot Rod Specialist is a great resource for our Nailhead engines. 

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The gurus also say not to use Fel-Pro head gaskets. I use both Fel-Pro gaskets and manifold gaskets and have yet to see failure. 

 

In before scolding. 

Edited by Beemon (see edit history)
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I've found a few holes in the "gurus" bible so I take with a grain of salt.. I've also noticed a trend when a new product comes out or a repo product..a lot of complaints that it's inferior and there's is the best... Makes me wonder

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