snydermd76@aol.com

Wanted: 1937 Buick Roadmaster to buy

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You want to drive this car EVERY DAY?

That would be quite unusual, and an experience worth writing about!

 

Mr. Snyder, don't overlook all the other Buick models.

They are equally good.  And even if you use your car frequently,

you shouldn't need a car equipped with 2 spares.  One should

suffice.  And if it's just basic transportation you seek, other

brands would be equally good.

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SC38DLS    111

John I drive my 38 Studebaker State Commander as an every day driver. It is not a show car. It was a barn find that had the engine, trans, brakes and electrical rebuilt and the paint buffed out. The interior was shot and to have it redone to an original look the shops wanted eight grand and that did not include the headliner. That was three quarters of the value of the car!  I'm 71 it's 79 it's going to out live me most likely so I'm going to drive the wheels off it. I've taken it on a few trips of 3 to 400 miles but mostly just drive it around town. A few minor repairs have been needed like new universals and a head gasket plus one tire problem but otherwise reliable, enjoyable and fun. I say if he can find the car he wants go for it. Again don't take a show car and use as a daily driver but a decent one can be ok. Have fun 

662AD9BC-656E-4C2C-AD58-42285585C98F-3164-0000063CF3CE8B77.jpeg

Edited by SC38DLS (see edit history)
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MCHinson    851

If you are not opposed to having to do a little bit of work to get the car ready for driving, there is one listed on the 36-38 Buick Club website. It has been advertised at $12,000 but it has been for sale for a while, so I would expect the owner to be a bit flexible on price. Here is a link to the club's advertisement page: http://www.3638buickclub.org/advertisements.html

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GregLaR    252

I used to drive my 1936 Buick every single day here in Palm Springs.

You shouldn't have too much difficulty finding that car. Good luck with your search.

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I see Mr. Snyder changed his request from "daily driver"

to something he could drive around.  Mr. Snyder, you

have found the most enjoyable part of the antique-car

hobby:  Driving!

 

If you join a club (such as AACA and one of its regions),

and go on driving tours with them, you will multiply your

fun.  You'll get to know many more people in the hobby.

Imagine going for a ride on scenic roads, stopping to

see interesting sights, in antique cars with 20 or 50 or 100 friends!

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SaddleRider    27
On ‎9‎/‎10‎/‎2017 at 1:12 PM, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

 

Mr. Snyder, don't overlook all the other Buick models.They are equally good.

 

I disagree.    Buick had a well-deserved reputation for providing good value for the money.    So of course all Buicks are "equally good" in terms of what they deliver when compared with other cars in their respective price ranges.

 

You are wise to select the Roadmaster - that gives you a MUCH larger and MUCH more powerful, responsive motor than the lower-priced Buicks.  Nicer interior trim, too.  If you are not aware of the difference between the smaller Buicks and the Roadmaster,  you owe it yourself to find and drive well-maintained versions of both, so you can see for yourself.

 

Bear in mind Buick was, along with Chevrolet, one of the last 'hold-outs" that still used "poured babbett" connecting rod bearings.    You may have seen my discussion elsewhere that by '37,  most responsible auto mfgs. had shifted over to the present universal use of "precision insert" type connecting rod bearings.    They really didn't have much choice - by the mid 1930's the vastly improved highway system had significantly increased driving speeds.   Trouble was,   pre-war cars typically have very "low"  ( high numerically)  final drive ratios,  so their motors are being abused - screaming nearly TWICE as fast  at any given road speed,  as a modern motor given modern gearing. Modern motors are much shorter stroke, so they are nowhere near as abusive to a crank-pin as the older long-stroke concept.

 

The combination of the long stroke of pre-war cars,  coupled with the long abandoned practice of "poured babbett" connection rods,  combined with those (by present standards...I don't think you can buy a dump truck today with rear end gearing that low)  is an invitation to disaster if you try and drive that pre-war Buick at modern speeds for any length of time.

 

You may be aware that once Buick went to 'precision" insert con rod bearings,  ( I believe that was for 1952 production)    Buick lovers "in the know" & who wanted to drive fast,   converted their earlier Buicks to those rods.   It may well be the car you wind up with was converted years ago,  in which case you can "drive it like you stole it" with no fear of connecting rod bearing failure.

 

Only way to know for sure is to "drop" the oil pan and take a look.   You really ought to "drop" the oil pan on any car of that era ( those oil pans were long and narrow, meaning a normal oil change does NOT get all the abrasive junk out,)  at least once every few years.  Good time to start doing that is when you first buy the car!

Edited by SaddleRider
asparagus stew (see edit history)

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MCHinson    851
7 hours ago, SaddleRider said:

 

I disagree.    Buick had a well-deserved reputation for providing good value for the money.    So of course all Buicks are "equally good" in terms of what they deliver when compared with other cars in their respective price ranges.

 

You are wise to select the Roadmaster - that gives you a MUCH larger and MUCH more powerful, responsive motor than the lower-priced Buicks.  Nicer interior trim, too.  If you are not aware of the difference between the smaller Buicks and the Roadmaster,  you owe it yourself to find and drive well-maintained versions of both, so you can see for yourself.

 

 

 

There are different models and they are probably all good cars, but I have to take exception to your post in one regard. You have apparently forgotten about the Century. The Century takes the smaller body of the Special and couples it with the larger engine found in the Roadmaster. At least from my perspective, the Century is the ultimate Buick of the era. It also does not have the wood of the 1937 Roadmaster body. So, a smaller, lighter, body without any potential rotten wood to repair and equipped with the largest engine that Buick produced in 1937 makes the Century a perfect car to me. I think that the only advantage of a Roadmaster over a Century is that it is CCCA eligible if that matters to you.

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Bloo    78
10 minutes ago, MCHinson said:

There are different models and they are probably all good cars, but I have to take exception to your post in one regard. You have apparently forgotten about the Century. The Century takes the smaller body of the Special and couples it with the larger engine found in the Roadmaster. At least from my perspective, the Century is the ultimate Buick of the era. It also does not have the wood of the 1937 Roadmaster body. So, a smaller, lighter, body without any potential rotten wood to repair and equipped with the largest engine that Buick produced in 1937 makes the Century a perfect car to me. I think that the only advantage of a Roadmaster over a Century is that it is CCCA eligible if that matters to you.

 

Higher gears, too.

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