Cavalier MK2

35 Auburn 851 Cabriolet barn find

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Restorer32    507

I know a young but experienced restorer who would love to undertake the project. Non metropolitan hourly rate to boot. I had a '35 Auburn 4 door conv, I believe Auburn called it a Phaeton? The car was collected in 1951 and had many new parts that had been purchased from the "factory" including new hubcaps at a cost of $1.57 each. Sadly. divorce forced me to sell it. Wish I still had it.

 

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Steve_Mack_CT    121

There are still some hobbyists who could take a project like this on and do most of it at home.  Part of me thinks the car should find its way to a pro, but as Ed points out, not as complex as some of the real big iron, multi cylinder Classics.  The guy who wants to spend 25 hours a week for years on a restoration isn't that common anymore,  but I bet each one of us knows someone like that.  The harsh reality for me is that I am just not that guy,  too many other things in life.  But this could be a great project for someone. 

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Well the car is still very much for sale through this ad on the forum and visits are being arranged for forum members or others who see the post. We are just trying to ad features that people have suggested. The update should be $30,000 obo. So far the best offers are in the 15,000 neighborhood with some talking about  a bit higher depending on what they see when the inspect it. I've been making a list of who offers what to go down when the time arrives, Last weeks offer of 15 can always evaporate so the guy with 14 may get it. One advantage of this is you can figure out what it is worth to you and still have a chance versus the auction method. The Ebay auction method is good for those who want to see where the price is now and how it can be changing day to day but that isn't implemented yet.

 

 

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On 9/11/2017 at 10:25 AM, Xander Wildeisen said:

In what way would you compare/reference these two cars? 

Sorry to be so long on getting back to this, business called and I was away from the computer for a few days.

 

The comparison is interesting to me in that we have a disassembled car for sale on one hand and a untouched relic on the other. A car sitting in boxes used to be called a basket case. This is actually a harder place to start from as you often don't know what bolts were used where or what crumbling bit may be missing that you need for a pattern etc... Or how it was put together originally. Both cars have some rust issues, the primered one has a fender rusted off while ours doesn't which makes me wonder about the condition before the primer. With ours you can see where it is now and the restorer can document what went where and how the factory did it originally versus dealing with what was acceptable restoration practices of the time. Their starting price is quite a bit higher so to me the value of this barn find is higher historically as well as in monetary terms. Of course I may be prejudiced!

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9 hours ago, mercer09 said:

 

A couple prospects didn't like my "fishing" but would prefer a set buy it now price. A couple would prefer to bid on a ebay format. I've asked the executors who happen to be 2 of my relatives to look into setting up a estate ebay account for the car auction to see if it is viable. I'm waiting to hear back. The buy it now suggestion went towards the more outrageous end of things. I was requested to make that $ 30,000 dollars for the collector who wants it now. The time table may be extended further into October to give more people the chance to see it if they want to. These aren't my calls so don't shoot the messenger.

 

exactly why threads like this are a waste of time, other then an enjoyable "curiosity".

9 hours ago, mercer09 said:

 

 Mercer, I'm glad you are enjoying the topic but since you aren't among the people making a offer yet I'm puzzled as to how your time is being wasted except by yourself. In reality to a serious collector not on a budget the asking price the forum wanted isn't a moon shot and the obo lets us keep making progress from the other direction.

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C Carl    324

IMHO what would be a waste of the "bait nibbler's"/interested party"s time would be if , after all this , (not to mention the time taken on the part of some to pay a visit) , the car was put on eBay and sold out from under the serious restorers here with proper historical reverence. Who knows how the Auburn might end up powered and/or decorated in Abu Dhabi , Japan , Senegal , or Tadjikistan ? No offense meant , those were just the first far-flung places which popped up in what is left of my mind. Hey ! It could well be customized by some talented , wealthy individual inside our own country. You know : His/her car , his/her money , his/her time , his/her taste. And THAT , again IMHO , would be a waste.  - Carl

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mercer09    142

 Mercer, I'm glad you are enjoying the topic but since you aren't among the people making a offer yet I'm puzzled as to how your time is being wasted except by yourself. In reality to a serious collector not on a budget the asking price the forum wanted isn't a moon shot and the obo lets us keep making progress from the other direction.

 

and you think I didnt make an offer?  huh......................................

 

 

you are obviously fishing and that is a waste of time to me. Especially when you now say the bidding may be extended, go on ebay, etc.

 

you are smooth, but not smooth enough for me.

 

:)  and yes, good luck with your sale. I am out for sure.

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viv w    31

Hi All,

 I owned 2 Auburn Cabriolets, a 1935 model 653 and a 1936 model 654, both of them were real basket cases when I found them and I would have loved to have found one this complete and in this condition. If I were living in the USA right now, I would be trying to buy it, but the freight costs and duty to get it to Africa would be unaffordable.

 My reason for chipping in on this post, is that during my research, for my cars, I had a list of the different body styles and their production totals. This list was in an ACD club magazine many years ago, taken from an original document of the Auburn Automobile company.

All Auburns are rare. According to the factory list, in 1935  449 cabriolet were built and in 1936 only 123 were built. These figures are total production of both 6 and 8 cylinder cars. It is said, that quite a few cabriolet bodies, of 6 cylinder cars ended up being fitted onto 8 cylinder frames.

 This car is all original, if you want a genuine Auburn 8 cylinder roadster, this is a rare chance  to buy and own one of these beautiful cars.

 They are not that hard to work on, and spares are available, at reasonable cost, considering the rarity of these cars.

 I think the vendor has put the car on this site, instead of ebay, for good reason, he wants the car to go to a good home, to be restored and loved, and I'd be very surprised if he were to take the highest offer, if it was from a hot rodder.

Viv.

 

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I do have a question for the Auburn experts. When you go to the link to see the Auburn project car for sale that people are using to compare to the one listed here. In the second picture shown here, you see a raised pinch weld that the back of the convertible top tacks down on. In the link for the car for sale that raised lip is not there. Ether that raised lip unbolts, or that is a coupe with the roof cut off? Also the finished values that are being thrown around seem high. For a non super charged car. And this post is getting to/too/two funny. I/have/given/the/owner/seller/estate/a/price/that/I/can/pay. I/know/others/can/pay/more/////. Took my Hudson truck out today and picked up a keg of beer with it. Sam Adams Octoberfest, enjoying a frosty mug of it right now. Not being one to partake in kool aid. I think I will go and pour myself another ice cold beer. The value of this car listed for sale will be found by passion and desire. 

buick 032.JPG

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Curti    210
On 9/8/2017 at 10:08 AM, alsancle said:

 All 35-36 coupes started out life at the factory as a cabriolet.

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C Carl    324

Hi Viv : I think the issue is that the vendor has to dance to the tune called by the executors. They are family members who have a fiduciary duty to the estate. The family had no sympathy for their brother/the vendor , nor the car when he wanted to "save it" at an earlier date , in a less degraded state. He may again be forced to accede to the mandates of the executors. He may not be able to "save it" at this point either.   - Carl

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2 hours ago, mercer09 said:

 Mercer, I'm glad you are enjoying the topic but since you aren't among the people making a offer yet I'm puzzled as to how your time is being wasted except by yourself. In reality to a serious collector not on a budget the asking price the forum wanted isn't a moon shot and the obo lets us keep making progress from the other direction.

 

and you think I didnt make an offer?  huh......................................

 

 

you are obviously fishing and that is a waste of time to me. Especially when you now say the bidding may be extended, go on ebay, etc.

 

you are smooth, but not smooth enough for me.

 

:)  and yes, good luck with your sale. I am out for sure.

I'm sorry, were you the low cash offer we had to take in one week or the one that wanted the car brought to you in Chicago? Not much loss and some gain. Please show your resolve by refraining from further comments. And yes I have to honor the requests of the estate and hope to be here on my own terms someday.

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6 minutes ago, C Carl said:

Hi Viv : I think the issue is that the vendor has to dance to the tune called by the executors. They are family members who have a fiduciary duty to the estate. The family had no sympathy for their brother/the vendor , nor the car when he wanted to "save it" at an earlier date , in a less degraded state. He may again be forced to accede to the mandates of the executors. He may not be able to "save it" at this point either.   - Carl

I'm trying, it is a bit like leading your pet cow Bessie to the slaughter house but everybody help me here. Repeat after me..... They are great people who need to be gently guided about the sale of an important part of American automotive history.....

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trimacar    530

I'm always baffled at threads that start out informative and interesting, and then turn into a murky, muddy, meandering mess.

 

Regardless of some of this silly chatter, I hope the car finds a good home.  It's always tough dealing with an estate sale.

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billorn    55
26 minutes ago, trimacar said:

I'm always baffled at threads that start out informative and interesting, and then turn into a murky, muddy, meandering mess.

 

Regardless of some of this silly chatter, I hope the car finds a good home.  It's always tough dealing with an estate sale.

 

Seems inevitable around here. No matter how tasty the punch someone always drops a turd in the punch bowl sooner or later on this board. If you look you will see that almost any topic going past 3 pages or so will have someone show up to throw a monkey wrench in the whole works and instead of continuing the discussion everyone starts bickering and sniping.

 

I think $30,000 is too much for this car and its probly a case of a person who doesnt know old cars very well seeing some big numbers in a price book or on TV and asking an inexperienced price based on that. Not that I mean the original poster but the family members that seem to be trying to double their profits when two weeks ago maybe they didnt even have a clue that dad's rusty old car was worth anything. It seems like its just greed and lack of knowledge on there part (again not the original poster). Maybe they saw the interest here and figured they would squeeze the stupid car guys who really seem to like the car for a few extra bucks. To us it seems offensive but maybe someone will pay it and if not the car will sit around until they come to their senses and price it right or cut it loose to a high offer or bidder.

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All I know for sure (right now about this car), is that I wish I could afford it, and that I were twenty years younger. Although it is a bit modern for my liking (I lean toward horseless carriages), it is an incredible and beautiful automobile. I have restored worse, and would have liked to tackle one like this years ago. As it stands, I have enough projects that I likely will never get to, that even if I had the money, I would be a fool to consider adding anything to the list.

All that said, I have mostly enjoyed following this thread, and dreaming a little.

But, pardon my bluntness, I could do without the P!$$!ng matches.

My apologies if I offended anybody.

 

Good luck with the sale, and I do hope it gets a wonderful caretaker home and beautifully restored. On that point, I would like to add my opinion (opinionated? Who? Me?). I have been arguing in favor of preservation over restoration since long before preservation became so popular. Forty to sixty years ago, way too many cars that really should have been preserved, were instead restored. That because it was a little easier to restore a car that did not need it. At least that is what everybody said. On the other hand. There is a point where a car really needs to be restored to be truly appreciated. I would say this car is beyond that point. A really good preservationist might be able to make this car look like a nice survivor. But it really is not a true survivor. Nearly everything will need to be taken apart, and worked over, to just make it look decent. Let alone driveable. And a car like this should be driven and seen.

Just my opinion.

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Curti    210

I do have a question for the Auburn experts. When you go to the link to see the Auburn project car for sale that people are using to compare to the one listed here. In the second picture shown here, you see a raised pinch weld that the back of the convertible top tacks down on.  

To the nay-stayers :   This car is definitely a cabriolet.  I feel confident that the serial number on the dataplate will be suffixed with an F,  not an M

 

IMG_20170730_112445381_HDR.jpg

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Not sure if I am miss reading your post Curti. I was saying the project car in the link looked like a coupe with the roof cut off. Because it had no raised pinch weld for the top to tack down on. The car posted here for sale looks to be a real cabriolet.  

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Matt Harwood    962

I have to wonder if those picking at the price have looked at the barn find 1930 Packard coupe also in the Buy/Sell forum for a figure several times larger than the figure people are putting on this Auburn. I know which one I'd rather have and which one has a greater upside when it's done...

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Curti    210
3 hours ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

Not sure if I am miss reading your post Curti. I was saying the project car in the link looked like a coupe with the roof cut off. Because it had no raised pinch weld for the top to tack down on. The car posted here for sale looks to be a real cabriolet.  

 I miss read your post . Sorry  !

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Rogerrabbit    5

It looks to be a good project and the car should find a good home, it's sad people want to make the water murky here or any other post.  The car is a good car, if you want it, get it, if you don't, ADMIRE THE HISTORY.

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60FlatTop    2,006

Sometimes I watch The Antiques Roadshow. People bring in stuff that has been in drawers, in attics, and various unceremonious places about their house. In some instances they get a high appraisal value and say "Oh, it has too much sentimental value to ever sell it." Back to the unceremonious nook it goes for a few more decades.

 

If someone has a car like this benevolently neglected Auburn and a person offers to buy it instead of what is going on now, sell it and be glad someone who values it more than the current owner.

 

It ain't hard to spot the cars old Uncle Jack picked up for $200 or less (probably much less) 60 years ago.

 

Thinking about that car being purchased and brought home around 1958 makes me remember the time I came home at 3 AM with 5 Muscovy ducks. Seemed like a good idea at the time.

 

Adams Octoberfest,eh.

Bernie

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This Auburn came home with my Dad around 48-49 and was off the road by 54 if knowing his driving years helps. It was his only car for most of that time as he lived on a cabin cruiser at the local yacht club.

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