Cavalier MK2

35 Auburn 851 Cabriolet barn find

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trimacar    524

Yes, he's "fishing", but in the nicest of ways and all cards on the table.  Here's car, here's current offer, here's deadline.  MUCH better format than someone who posts vague information and then sits back, thinking the world is going to show up on doorstep...I think the poster/seller is offering an honest car at a, always debatable of course, fair price, and for small bucks (relatively speaking, sheesh, have to hedge words) you enter the ACD world...

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C Carl    320

The "it" that some fortunate car guy will take away is this extremely worthwhile Auburn. Hopefully staying on with us in the resurrection/restoration process. From my perspective , I hope the new owner will strive towards the definitive high standards set by the Master Himself , Curt , in post 31 above. That car is indeed , IMHO , absolute perfection in every detail. And this thread is so interesting because of the interactive participation and honest encouragement from the seller. Yeah , this is a wonderful way to sell a car among ladies and gentlemen who can take this prize on. Most or all of us probably wish WE could.  - Carl

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I went to go look at this Cord a few years ago. The guy selling it had an Auburn Cab there. The Cord did not check out for the money IMO, the Auburn did catch my eye. Owner did not want to sell the Auburn. I do like the looks of the 35-36 Auburns with out side mounts, I think they break up the lines of the car. 

bad cord 031.JPG

bad cord 051.JPG

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Steve_Mack_CT    113

Considering an original, similarly rough 30 A roadster sold right around the  $10k mark (picked this example as it was in green field last year,  so some folk might recall) & unrestored, original but rough open v8 Ford projects go for more when they pop up, $15 to $20k seems pretty reasonable for a  few rungs up the food chain.   Interesting discussionfor sure.

 

Curti, I hope all goes well with mrs. Curti.  

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)

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edinmass    271

Gentlemen, the poster of this car for sale has posted a nice, correct, interesting, and rather rare car for sale. While I don't know Auburns like many of the other cars I often comment on here, the post accurately defined the car, it's history, and hade more photos posted than the average barn find we see here. He also stated a current offer he had on the car locally, which seems like a fair and near  to the correct sphere of what the car would sell for. He posted he is looking for a higher offer. None of this is beyond reason, and EVERY ONE here always tries to get their best return on their dollar. Very often I don't  post my for sale stuff here because of pricing comments. Let's not push away people selling cars and parts that are relevant to our hobby and interest by posting comments that are in a broad sense negative to the post. I don't think any of the comments here have be rude or obstructive, and the entire post has been interesting to follow. Is the gentleman fishing for a higher price and a better offer? Sure, and I would do the same. If I owned the car I would have started at 28,500 and would not be embarrassed to use that as a starting point. As a seller I can always lower my asking price. I have friends who regularly go to the casino and drop ten grand in a weekend. What's the big deal if a true Auburn collector pays five to ten grand more than many of us here think the car is worth? Pre war unrestored and unmolsted open project cars are almost non exsistant. I rather start with a car like this that has had poor storage than a improperly done budget ametur restoration as a starting point. Let me assure you unmolested cars are much easier to do, and cost much less than many of the rolling and running 70's garage restorations I find myself looking at today.  With a bit of luck, this car will end up with one of the known forum member as it's new owner, and maybe then we can have a thread of the restoration. Let's keep all the posts on this site positive and helpful, it's the best and most active hobby blog we have, and we should all try to further it along with positive experiences for all. Ed

 

PS- has anyone here looked at the price of a 25 horse power John Deere lawn mower lately? Makes the Auburn barn find look like a bargain at any price!

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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edinmass    271

Interesting barn find, very poor storage. And sold for 1.9 million. Is there anyone here who wouldn't like to see a detailed thread on the cars restoration? I am strictly a pre war car guy, and this is an interesting and challenging post war car. I myself would find the restoration process  fascinating to observe. Reguardless of the cars value as is and when done, I'm glad there are people still willing to preserve automotive history. Does anyone know where this car ended up? Sorry to go off topic, but that's what makes the AACA site so much fun. 

IMG_3638.PNG

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alsancle    430

Ed,  who are these "gentlemen" you are referring to?   And, the Talbot barn find brought the 1.9 million because they used trick lighting in the photography to make it seem nicer than it was.

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Matt Harwood    941
5 hours ago, edinmass said:

Interesting barn find, very poor storage. And sold for 1.9 million. Is there anyone here who wouldn't like to see a detailed thread on the cars restoration? I am strictly a pre war car guy, and this is an interesting and challenging post war car. I myself would find the restoration process  fascinating to observe. Reguardless of the cars value as is and when done, I'm glad there are people still willing to preserve automotive history. Does anyone know where this car ended up? Sorry to go off topic, but that's what makes the AACA site so much fun. 

IMG_3638.PNG

 

The only remaining original Talbot-Lago components on that car when it's done will be the engine block and the serial number plate...

 

I made a comment with my thoughts on the Auburn's value and then deleted it so as to not muddy the waters. I think the expert and educated advice that the seller is receiving here is quite useful and I believe it will build buyer confidence for whomever ultimately buys this Auburn. However, I've always believed that the buyer is the only arbiter of what constitutes a good deal. We may be artificially putting a ceiling on the value of that car if there's someone who really wants to have it, and that's not fair to the seller, either. In comparison to the cost of restoration, acquisition cost will be a fraction of overall money spent, so a few bucks either way won't really make a difference. A very worthy car whose upside is still going up--Auburn cabriolets will not be getting cheaper and as supercharged cars and speedsters skyrocket, the lesser cars will inevitably be dragged along for the ride. The car isn't too far away from being a push today (given that an excellent one can sell for $150,000). After five years of restoration, who knows what it'll be worth, but it won't be less than today. That car's not a money-maker, but it'll hurt you a lot less than a lot of other projects you can buy today for a similar amount of money.

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auburnseeker    490

Are you sure that talbot was a barn find?  I've seen field cars from the 30's that look better than that.  Had to be the worst barn built.  Or solid stone bottom floor with ventilation and a constant leak. 

IMG_3638.PNG

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I thought I was looking at a finished Talbot rat rod. If you look close you can see the chalk/rust out line of the automotive body starting to form on the floor. The white back ground is a nice touch. This is an interesting post. I talked to the seller for about 45 minutes. His car, his sale, his way. I know cars from the Pacific North West very well. Rust is always lurking, what makes it a nice project was stated above, no hands have steered the project in one direction yet. Cars are still out there, lots of cars stuffed in barns out here. Zooming in on the pictures it looks like there is a plate held on with pop rivets below the trunk and above the rear bumper. Not picking on the Auburn. The seller has opened up the door to an open discussion about the car. Because of the format he chose to sell it. Nothing wrong with that, nobody has been slamming anyone. I would love to see pictures of it being worked on. That would be a 180 from the pictures of four tires in the grave. If more years pass by with nothing being done to the Auburn. We can all gaze at pictures of it one day, with a white back ground.

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On 9/9/2017 at 8:57 AM, alsancle said:

 

 

All of this is true.  Although I should note that a friend of mine sold a complete supercharged engine for 27k 10 years ago.  If this car was blown it would be 30-40k, no problem, and yes I would get out a fishing pole and find my wallet for that.

 

The 35/36 Auburn is a great driving car as John points out.  The 2 speed is great, and the blower whine is better.

 

 

 I will stand in the 30-40K Supercharged Cabriolet line all day long to get one at that price and be far from alone in the line too - all be it for touring I am partial to a non-s/c cars.

 

And, on the restored front: The car on SignificantCars.com http://significantcars.com/cars/1935auburn8/  site is exceptional - there are only perhaps 5 to 10 at best  Supercharged Cabriolets with this quality of restoration - and yes they sell for a lot on money when this well restored (perhaps 30% to 50% more than a well restored car).  And, it judges very high by both AACA, CCCA and ACD Club standards (and also very authentic car per ACD correct). 

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edinmass    271
On 9/12/2017 at 9:35 AM, Matt Harwood said:

 

The only remaining original Talbot-Lago components on that car when it's done will be the engine block and the serial number plate...

 

I made a comment with my thoughts on the Auburn's value and then deleted it so as to not muddy the waters. I think the expert and educated advice that the seller is receiving here is quite useful and I believe it will build buyer confidence for whomever ultimately buys this Auburn. However, I've always believed that the buyer is the only arbiter of what constitutes a good deal. We may be artificially putting a ceiling on the value of that car if there's someone who really wants to have it, and that's not fair to the seller, either. In comparison to the cost of restoration, acquisition cost will be a fraction of overall money spent, so a few bucks either way won't really make a difference. A very worthy car whose upside is still going up--Auburn cabriolets will not be getting cheaper and as supercharged cars and speedsters skyrocket, the lesser cars will inevitably be dragged along for the ride. The car isn't too far away from being a push today (given that an excellent one can sell for $150,000). After five years of restoration, who knows what it'll be worth, but it won't be less than today. That car's not a money-maker, but it'll hurt you a lot less than a lot of other projects you can buy today for a similar amount of money.

 

Matt, I thought you had more experience than that in the hobby, the engine block and serial tag will be original, along with the factory air in the tubes. Factory air will add another twenty five percent to the value of the car. 😇  These easy buff it out and make it run preservation class cars are more and more popular! 😛

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Zimm63    23
6 hours ago, alsancle said:

Ed,  who are these "gentlemen" you are referring to?   And, the Talbot barn find brought the 1.9 million because they used trick lighting in the photography to make it seem nicer than it was.

Only way lighting will make that car look better is if you shine it directly into the buyer's eyes.  What a mess of a once beautiful car.

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43 minutes ago, Zimm63 said:

Only way lighting will make that car look better is if you shine it directly into the buyer's eyes.  What a mess of a once beautiful car.

But at least it is being shown with the hood down.:)

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mercer09    142

reminds me of the Bugatti they pulled out of the Swiss lake, because the owner couldnt pay the bridge toll after a long night of card playing!

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AC Fuhrman    55
19 hours ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

I went to go look at this Cord a few years ago. The guy selling it had an Auburn Cab there. The Cord did not check out for the money IMO, the Auburn did catch my eye. Owner did not want to sell the Auburn. I do like the looks of the 35-36 Auburns with out side mounts, I think they break up the lines of the car. 

bad cord 031.JPG

bad cord 051.JPG

NICE garage - lift, coffee maker, Christmas lights and a comfy chair!!!

 

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edinmass    271
10 hours ago, alsancle said:

Ed,  who are these "gentlemen" you are referring to?   And, the Talbot barn find brought the 1.9 million because they used trick lighting in the photography to make it seem nicer than it was.

 

Anyone who associates himself with yours truly is obviously NOT a gentleman. So no need for you to be offended. Although if I did offend you, I am satisfied with my comments!😜

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

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16 hours ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

 This is an interesting post. I talked to the seller for about 45 minutes. His car, his sale, his way. I know cars from the Pacific North West very well. Rust is always lurking, what makes it a nice project was stated above, no hands have steered the project in one direction yet. Cars are still out there, lots of cars stuffed in barns out here. Zooming in on the pictures it looks like there is a plate held on with pop rivets below the trunk and above the rear bumper. Not picking on the Auburn. The seller has opened up the door to an open discussion about the car. Because of the format he chose to sell it. Nothing wrong with that, nobody has been slamming anyone. I would love to see pictures of it being worked on. That would be a 180 from the pictures of four tires in the grave. If more years pass by with nothing being done to the Auburn. We can all gaze at pictures of it one day, with a white back ground.

 

I know I was more clear on this but we should make a note for the record. The car belongs to my father's estate. I was tasked with the selling end of various mechanical and aquatic things. The executors of the estate will be the ones signing the bill of sale and transferring the clear title. I actually don't get anything out of this, no commission, proceeds etc.... the monies raised go towards paying off the debt's of my father's estate. So chatting with everybody has been a effort to make this a positive transaction. I've also mentioned that we are open to suggestions. My informal offer taking is my attempt to be fair to everyone, the buyers, estate and car but is not without its hazards.

 

A couple prospects didn't like my "fishing" but would prefer a set buy it now price. A couple would prefer to bid on a ebay format. I've asked the executors who happen to be 2 of my relatives to look into setting up a estate ebay account for the car auction to see if it is viable. I'm waiting to hear back. The buy it now suggestion went towards the more outrageous end of things. I was requested to make that $ 30,000 dollars for the collector who wants it now. The time table may be extended further into October to give more people the chance to see it if they want to. These aren't my calls so don't shoot the messenger.

 

If it was my car it would already be sold to one of the initial prospects before I put in the ad because it seemed like he'd really work on the car. That said it has been great getting to know so many of you and finding that a fair amount sound like they are just as interested in the project.

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mercer09    142
2 hours ago, Cavalier MK2 said:

fo

 

A couple prospects didn't like my "fishing" but would prefer a set buy it now price. A couple would prefer to bid on a ebay format. I've asked the executors who happen to be 2 of my relatives to look into setting up a estate ebay account for the car auction to see if it is viable. I'm waiting to hear back. The buy it now suggestion went towards the more outrageous end of things. I was requested to make that $ 30,000 dollars for the collector who wants it now. The time table may be extended further into October to give more people the chance to see it if they want to. These aren't my calls so don't shoot the messenger.

 

exactly why threads like this are a waste of time, other then an enjoyable "curiosity".

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roysboystoys    35

This is an example of why these should be under general discussion , or at least a separate car  category for cars for sale/ wanted.

Each reply drives someone else's ad of a part for sale or wanted farther down the pages.

This is certainly a " juicy" subject , I read it every day. But there should be a way to have it in " general discussion" under

Auburn for sale 

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auburnseeker    490

I don't see threads like this as a waste.  They educate us about a marque many may not be familiar with.  They test our ability to make educated assumptions about value.  The may open our minds on different ways to market cars, and they hopefully in the end show us what the true current market is for a similar car and why it was so valuable or not worth what it seems it should be or why it was so hard to sell or went very quickly.  All very helpful tools for those possibly looking into purchasing one in the near future.  

It's not a 55 Chevy or a 67 Malibu, that you can easily find several at any moment in the same condition to compare,  so few people probably know much about cars like this,  what it takes to restore them or why one project is so desirable but others are very tough to sell. 

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Steve_Mack_CT    113

I think if the seller is open to the discussion,  and participants keep a level of decorum, anyone not interested can just pass by.  Precisely because this isn't a common garden car, it has drawn interest.  Seller seems like an honest guy to me, and whose to say a buyer won't come from either the group participating in the thread, or reading it.  Not much else going on here these days, which is why this is a hot thread.

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
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With so many topics on this forum about interest in classic/custom/collector cars on the decline. It is funny to see this post get so much attention. It shows that interest is strong. Remove that Auburn from the pictures, and replace it with a 1933 Packard Coupe Roadster, or a 1953 Buick Skylark, or a 1971 Cuda. And the response would be the same. The seller did right by his families estate, the format he chose brought a lot of attention to the Auburn for sale. And got a lot of people looking at the for sale section on this forum. 2226 views on this  ad in six days. And every time I go back to this post I scan over new posts for sale. So this ad has most likely brought more traffic to other ads.  There is no book that states the value of that car. It's value will be set by passion and desire. And that is what makes this hobby/industry/trade different from so many others.

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