Cavalier MK2

35 Auburn 851 Cabriolet barn find

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  4 hours ago, Dave Fields said:

Full Classics, unless something highly unique or custom are very soft right now. I unfortunately see a 350 Chevy going into this one.

 

I don't think so.  Auburns have a very strong following.  Somebody will buy it.

 

Correct !   And, we (ACD) have a strong club and unlike many marques a large number of members in their 20's to 50's, as well as multi-generational ownership and ...  Best of all- the cars are all very roadable, as well as stylish.

 

Sidenote:  One of the joys of an Auburn is that they drive so nice and part of this is attributed to Auburn scrimping on the steel (which makes them lighter than comparable cars of their size and horsepower - they are some of the better driving pre-1953 cars) - a rusty one of these is no joy to restore.  Also, these are largely all metal body construction (a cabriolet does have some wood in it though).

 

Parts availability is good too, though there is a hierarchy in car parts and rule of thumb is sort many say is perhaps Duesenberg, Ferrari, Rolls-Royce, Cord, Auburn, and then most other cars.

 

And, not many convertible project cars show up so prices for a cars unrestored cars have historically ranged mid to high 20's to low 40's (and a supercharged unrestored car will go 10K plus higher).

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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ilikescars    0

I spent a Winter with a similar Cabriolet that appeared to be very rough at first, but turned out to be fairly solid.   I did just enough work on it to

get it running and driving and even drove it in the annual Auburn parade.  Fun project, if you enjoy playing with cars...

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JAK    17

Couldn't agree more with mercer09,  yes I know about the journey, I've been taking them since the mid 60's when I very litteraly

begged my Dad to buy a 1931 Auburn Speedster for $500. He did the day I left for the service, after I promised I'd return.  30 years ago this car

would have had multiple  offers, today, its a lonely journey , not much traffic, and there are a lot of highways to choose from.  Sadly I think we will see 

more of these great projects remain just that.  Don't like it, but don't like getting older either.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Gunsmoke    44

What a great project start, the better the starting price, the more likely someone will justify the bigger cost to restore. Not a cheap restoration if to show quality, perhaps $100K. The nice thing about restoring a rare beautiful car is the enjoyment of owning and caring for a car literally no one else has. Like a pretty woman, you never get tired of looking at her........it! Good luck. (and excuse the chauvinism).

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alsancle    430
15 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

 

  4 hours ago, Dave Fields said:

Full Classics, unless something highly unique or custom are very soft right now. I unfortunately see a 350 Chevy going into this one.

 

I don't think so.  Auburns have a very strong following.  Somebody will buy it.

 

Correct !   And, we (ACD) have a strong club and unlike many marques a large number of members in their 20's to 50's, as well as multi-generational ownership and ...  Best of all- the cars are all very roadable, as well as stylish.

 

Sidenote:  One of the joys of an Auburn is that they drive so nice and part of this is attributed to Auburn scrimping on the steel (which makes them lighter than comparable cars of their size and horsepower - they are some of the better driving pre-1953 cars) - a rusty one of these is no joy to restore.  Also, these are largely all metal body construction (a cabriolet does have some wood in it though).

 

Parts availability is good too, though there is a hierarchy in car parts and rule of thumb is sort many say is perhaps Duesenberg, Ferrari, Rolls-Royce, Cord, Auburn, and then most other cars.

 

And, not many convertible project cars show up so prices for a cars unrestored cars have historically ranged mid to high 20's to low 40's (and a supercharged unrestored car will go 10K plus higher).

 

 

All of this is true.  Although I should note that a friend of mine sold a complete supercharged engine for 27k 10 years ago.  If this car was blown it would be 30-40k, no problem, and yes I would get out a fishing pole and find my wallet for that.

 

The 35/36 Auburn is a great driving car as John points out.  The 2 speed is great, and the blower whine is better.

 

 

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Curti    208
21 hours ago, alsancle said:

Talking on the internet is always easy,  but I stated a value based on knowing a little bit about Auburns.  What do you think it is worth?

My wife is having some health issues, so I am not on-line much.  I agree with AJ.  I have been in contact with Chris for months  in reference to this car.  I agree with the 17-20 range. I bought this cabriolet  in the suggested price range and restored it myself

for well under 150  First primary & first senior  at Auburn. 

36 cab2.jpg

09acd event (1).JPG

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auburnseeker    490

I was wondering if the damp storage though make this car more rusty than yours Curti.  I see alot of heavy surface rust which presents more expensive plating and alot more metal repair if you sent this out to be dipped or blasted. 

 

I had a 53 Buick Convertible that looked alot like the car above,  but if you really looked deep,  it had alot of creep rot which damp storage cars have and you don't see the extent until you really get into it. 

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Thanks for the continued interest everybody. There are people scheduling visits to see the car which is the best way to determine condition for yourself. A couple of questions have arisen that I should have put in the first posting.

 

1  There is a clear title.

 

2  The time line of winding this up after the first week in October is firm so everybody gets a chance to ponder things or arrange visits.

 

It is interesting to here from the different camps regarding the car and it's restoration. I'm sure it could be made into a show car or left rough enough to use. I'd like to see it on the road again and think there is merit to both approaches. While the condition of this car is rough the best thing going for it is it hasn't been picked through or tampered with. It is a complete car.

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alsancle    430

Yes,  there are at least two camps.   One of the camps  knows the Auburn market and values an untouched if rough car.    Please come back after the car is sold and let us know how you did.

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)

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trimacar    524

First, I think this is a great car.  I won't use the old "gee, if it were only in my part of the world" excuse for not buying, but will make some comments.

 

First, the car is too far over the edge to consider "getting it running and driving as is".  Let's be serious, bad wheels, engine needing removal and analysis, and so forth.

 

Second, a good restoration candidate for sure, but the days of backyard restorations are behind us now.  No local shiny chrome shop, no body guys working for beer, no local machine shops eager for work, no trimmers waiting for leather and top to enjoy installing...so, restoration costs are high.   I have a lot of friends in the business, and do my own upholstery, and were I a younger man, I'd still have 80K to 100K in that car, bought at 15K, out the door of my garage...the numbers just add up..

 

So, I stand by my number of 15K, as it sits...but for your sake, hope you get more and are happy where it goes!

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Well, as a former machinist I can tell you there are local machine shops looking for work. I'm actually a decent panel beater and am surprised more people don't do their own as it is rewarding. The big towns have the chrome shops and there is a steady trade for the upholsterers but you might be smart to hire the boat guys for the top though these things can be learned too. So I think the hands on guy could do well and by your estimates going the pro route you wouldn't lose money.

 

That said these cars don't take rocket science to work on and I agree anybody contemplating firing it up and getting it running would best be served by taking it apart and doing it right.

 

That said it does have a vibe that says, "Hey, I'm not dead yet, the road awaits." This is spoken in subtle things like finding the springs holding their shape, the chassis feeling solid and the subtle aura that if you scrounged some odd bits and had some time in a sequestered garage you might be able to escape a zombie apocalypse.

 

To me these things are as much about the journey as the destination. As I said to one of the Canadian contingent these projects are about fun, not value measured in minutes spent but hours banked on understanding a link to another time. While my Dad had the car painted when it was just 15 year old used, interesting wheels , it is as is bolted together by the guys working in the factory. Some of you still understand things like that and how you can learn about the way things were done versus approaching a car that has been gone through at least twice already.

 

I think the price we started at addresses the controversy head on. It wasn't posted as Auburn 851 for $35,000 but offers above $12,000? I have people on my end I have to do right by but for myself it is as important to find someone who will have fun and give it a good home. I've lived long enough in this life to know it isn't about the money but what you do with your time. This car would be a good ride for someone's journey.

 

To alsancle I will of course let the forum know what happens. As a gent I may have to be general about the amount but hopefully the new owner will post about the resurrection.

 

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C Carl    320

Very well said , neighbor , (I am in Seattle and Ellensburg). The more I read here , the more dismayed I feel that bizarre sibling whatchacallit kept your hands off the Auburn as it slowly degraded. Oh , well. But thank you very much for giving the wonderful TRUE restorers and preservationists here on AACA forums a fair opportunity on your car. Good luck with the sale , and I sure hope the new owner will give you some wheel time when ready. I would if I could , but I can't.  - Carl

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edinmass    271

It's a nice car. I'm sure it won't be made into a modern street rod. The ACD club is strong, and has lots of active members. Parts and help are reasonably available. It's not a complicated car. It's just straightforward restoration. Remember, Auburns were a terrific MID priced car. Probably the best value for the dollar on the market at that time. BUT they have many fewer parts than a Packard, Rolls, Lincoln, etc.   People don't often realize the number of additional parts-I.E. additional cost in doing the super high end cars. There are sometime three or four more times the parts in the monster classics. The dash on one of my cars had almost three hundred stainless and chrome pieces on it. And please don't let my comments go as a put down on the Auburn. We have one in the garage, they are very stylish and a blast to drive. And with speedsters regularly running in the SEVEN figure range, as convertible is a bargain. Add to that there is always someone wanting a open car project, and the car will get done. As far as to price.....I'm not that familiar with project cars from Auburn Indiana. Supply and demand will see that is goes for what it is actually worth. If it were mine, I would try and make it run and take it to the ACD festival as is. I'm kind of twisted like that, it's more  interesting to me the way it sits now than restored. Good luck to both buyer and seller, I hope they are both happy with the transaction. Maybe we will see it in the restoration blog here in the future......Ed

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Cool car. I have had my eye on a 34 Hudson 8 Coupe for awhile. But that Auburn would make a great project. If it is for sale, please send me some info on it. I would have to turn loose of a different project car, but I have done that before. And do not be so quick to think that a 350 would go in there. I am guessing that a 308 Hudson Hornet Twin H engine fits right in an Auburn.

Auburn 001.JPG

Auburn 013.JPG

Auburn 014.JPG

Auburn 015.JPG

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The car is for sale, offers are being collected into the first week of October and appointments for viewing are being made. Look at my initial posting,  send me a email and I'll give you a call. Personally I'd go through the Lycoming straight 8, it is a loooong hood.

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As to the convertible angle a cabriolet covers all the bases. You can leave the back up for a sun roof effect, take the whole thing down and for real wind in your hair motoring the windshield folds forward and lays flat on those days you just want to wear your goggles.

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alsancle    430
1 hour ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

Cool car. I have had my eye on a 34 Hudson 8 Coupe for awhile. But that Auburn would make a great project. If it is for sale, please send me some info on it. I would have to turn loose of a different project car, but I have done that before. And do not be so quick to think that a 350 would go in there. I am guessing that a 308 Hudson Hornet Twin H engine fits right in an Auburn.

 

Since that is a reproduction body your speedster it is a cool hot rod with that Hudson engine.   The cabriolet we are talking about is real, so putting in a hudson engine would sort of be a crime, wouldn't it?  That Auburn engine is about as cheap and easy a rebuild as you can find for a eight cylinder prewar car.

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Curti    208
2 hours ago, alsancle said:

 

Since that is a reproduction body your speedster it is a cool hot rod with that Hudson engine.   The cabriolet we are talking about is real, so putting in a hudson engine would sort of be a crime, wouldn't it?  That Auburn engine is about as cheap and easy a rebuild as you can find for a eight cylinder prewar car.

 AMEN !

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trimacar    524

Interesting things that a "for sale" post brings to light, I guess I'm torn between two views now....one, that a "for sale" post should be locked, so no one can comment or criticize or say "gee, that's too much money".

 

The other view is, it brings up such interesting side bars....omigosh, how ever else would I have seen the vision of a Hudson engine in a replicated Auburn speedster?

 

All that said, this is an honest shed find, no fluorescent lights here, car has been squirreled away for year....and is worthy of a restoration.  Would you be "in the bucket" at the end of restoration?  Maybe, but you'd have a wonderful car.

 

OK, I will play the "it's too far away" card.  Think about it, if this car were next door to you, and all you had to do was drag it down one driveway, and up yours (no pun intended), sheesh, $15K or so?  Money easy to replace, such a car, not so much.

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This is all interesting stuff and new to me with this forum and topic but my daily driver is a 65 Volvo 122S so I do get some practice. It takes me up and down the West coast. Anyone can drive a car, vintage motoring is an adventure.

 

A couple of quick observations about the price topic, the people who are actually coming to see the car, emailed and traded phone calls have not been the ones posting about value. Everybody who has offered an opinion is too far away, doesn't like the mark, is too old or has a full garage or belabors the hired out costs of restoration. I'm not offended by the valuations as I entered this with no expectations but do think it might have an inhibiting effect on a buyer who wants it more than Charlie but would be embarrassed to admit the anty.

 

One of the largest categories of offers collected so far is the "If nobody else wants it call me" file. The bargain hunters or people on a budget. Tis human nature I'm sure but this listing was posted with solid offers so below that price please don't apply or have your friends try to damp things down. If it gets silly the car can wait.

 

That said there have been some really fantastic, interesting people setting things up I will not begrudge a bargain to. Because I think this car represents real value and that somebody will indeed get their money's worth.

 

I'm not a bidder here, just the guy trying to find a friend a new home.

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9 hours ago, alsancle said:

 

Since that is a reproduction body your speedster it is a cool hot rod with that Hudson engine.   The cabriolet we are talking about is real, so putting in a hudson engine would sort of be a crime, wouldn't it?  That Auburn engine is about as cheap and easy a rebuild as you can find for a eight cylinder prewar car.

I thought that would get a few of you going. I would rebuild the Lycoming engine in the Auburn. I am torn between two worlds, a custom guy at heart. But I do love original cars from the late 20's-30's. The Auburn looks to be a good project, it is close to me, about a 7 hour drive one way. Might take a look, road trip.

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Thank you Dave, that is a helpful comparison for people thinking of a purchase.

 

I'll be responding to folks in just the evenings for a few days but everybody making contact will get replied to.

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22 hours ago, trimacar said:

Interesting things that a "for sale" post brings to light, I guess I'm torn between two views now....one, that a "for sale" post should be locked, so no one can comment or criticize or say "gee, that's too much money".

 

The other view is, it brings up such interesting side bars....omigosh, how ever else would I have seen the vision of a Hudson engine in a replicated Auburn speedster?

 

All that said, this is an honest shed find, no fluorescent lights here, car has been squirreled away for year....and is worthy of a restoration.  Would you be "in the bucket" at the end of restoration?  Maybe, but you'd have a wonderful car.

 

OK, I will play the "it's too far away" card.  Think about it, if this car were next door to you, and all you had to do was drag it down one driveway, and up yours (no pun intended), sheesh, $15K or so?  Money easy to replace, such a car, not so much.

This isn't really a "For Sale" post.  It is a "Fishing for the Best Price" post.

 

I didn't think we were supposed to do that. Do your due diligence and post it for sale.  I know we do not have to include a price in our listings, but this isnt an auction site either.

 

My two cents

Matt

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