MCHinson

1938 Buick Century Model 61 - Four Door Touring Sedan - Trunk Back

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This morning, I installed the battery hold down bracket. I then checked out the results of the Ospho application. The Ospho instructions indicate that a powdery white film may develop on the surface. Apparently the second application of Ospho worked since most of the bottom of the body was covered by a powdery white film. I followed the instructions and brushed the film off. After that, I used a couple of spray cans of black paint and think that I have the bottom of the body painted. I will give it a day or two to dry and if no touch ups are needed, I will be ready to install the body mounting pads, drop the body down and secure it to the frame. 

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Today I lifted the body slightly and rearranged the bricks that were keeping it spaced up off of the frame. I then lowered it back onto the bricks so that I could apply Ospho to the small sections that were previously sitting on the bricks. Tomorrow, I will touch up the paint on the small sections of the bottom of the body that were previously blocked by the bricks. After that, I should be ready to install the rubber body mounting bolt pads and install the body on the frame. 

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The weather is back to normal. The temperatures are higher and the sun will hopefully melt most of the rest of the snow, ice, and slush this afternoon. This morning, I painted the remaining small areas of the bottom of the body. I installed the rubber body mounting pads. I used some lubricant spray on them and then using some needle nose pliers, I was able to get them into place. With the lubrication, I was able to reach up through the mounting tabs, grab the piece that has to go through the hole, and by twisting and grabbing different areas of the rubber, I could pull it until it popped through the mounting tab and into place.  I then slightly raised the body using jacks, moved the chassis slightly to line everything up, and then lowered the jacks to drop the body into place. I then cleaned up the body mounting bolts and nuts and secured the body to the chassis.  

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Today, I finally got around to draining the rear differential. It was a little bit over full when I started as it started draining when I removed the drain plug. The existing gear oil looked fine. I then removed the rear cover, removed the old gasket abnd unspected everything. There was no sign of any problem. Nothing unexpected was located so I installed a new gasket and reinstalled the rear cover. I then filled it with Masterpro GL-4 140 weight gear oil and reinstalled the drain plug. 

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Is GL4 an extreme pressure gear lubricant? I know it is used in transmissions, but not recommended for differentials. I have used 85W-140 GL5 EP gear oil in the differentials of my Packards. Look forward to the posts on your work and progress. It is going to be a very nice Buick. JWL

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1 hour ago, JWLawrence said:

Is GL4 an extreme pressure gear lubricant? I know it is used in transmissions, but not recommended for differentials. I have used 85W-140 GL5 EP gear oil in the differentials of my Packards. Look forward to the posts on your work and progress. It is going to be a very nice Buick. JWL

GL-4 is indeed an extreme pressure (EP) gear oil, and is suitable for HYPOID differentials.  Rule of thumb I use is that if the pinion enters the pumpkin below the center line, it's hypoid.  NON-hypoid diffs (for Pierce, thru 1928) don't need EP and often have some yellow metal components, so I use 600-W for them.  GL-5, which seems to be the only stuff on shelves these days with the exception of O'Reilly's GL-4, is also EP but is primarily for anti-slip diffs and is reportedly much less friendly to yellow metals than GL-4.  I don't use GL-5 on any of my vintage vehicles.

 

My Jeepster owner's manual is very explicit that NON-hypoid "straight mineral oil" (now called GL-1) be used in the transmission and overdrive, and that EP lube (now GL-4) should be used in the differential.  The manual says VERY explicitly not to use the same lube in both.  Accordingly, I use GL-1 in transmissions, overdrives, and free-wheeling units.

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Yes the GL-4 is rated for Extreme Pressure or Hypoid and is appropriate for the differential. 

 

Today I did not get any work done on the Buick. A few minutes after I arrived in the garage to start this morning, the power went out. The power was out for a couple of hours and after it came back on, I had a rush engraving order to produce for a customer who needed it shipped overnight. I went to UPS to ship the order and their computers were acting up and it took longer there than it ever has before. When I got home, my internet service was out. It took Spectrum a while to get that back online. Nothing much has gone right today except for the fact that the power was out when the weather was about 70 degrees instead of last week's sub-freezing temperatures. 

 

 

I started to post this this afternoon, and before I hit submit, the internet was out again. I had a local AACA Chapter Board meeting this evening and now that I am back home, the internet is working again. It has been an odd day.

 

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Sounds like my week. Nothing going right. The biggest issue is when FedEx pulled into my driveway and turned it wide and wiped out my split rail fence. They were coming to pick up my defective fire extinguisher. The driver didn't say anything. Just drove off. 10 minutes later I came home from town and saw the fence rails and post all over the yard. Isn't life is grand?

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This morning, I had a little bit of time to work on the Buick, although in another unusual occurrance, I had another customer with an engraving order that I had to make today and send overnight by UPS. Today, UPS still had some computer issues but it only took about 15 minutes to send the package today.

 

It is a lot more fun working on the body that was not left outside for a couple of decades. None of the hardware needed any solvent today. I was able to remove the windshield molding, the dash, and the dash pad. After removing the dash pad, I was able to pop out the rivets holding the body data plate. I thought it was interesting to see the differences between the Model 41 body data plate and the Model 61 body data plate. I guess Fisher Body did not think there were enough Century's made to justify embossing the model number on the data plate. The Model 41 data plate has the model number embossed while the Model 61 plate has the model number hand stamped.

 

 

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This morning, I did a bit of touch up painting on the frame. After that, I removed the back window frame. I then removed all of the hardware that was attached to the dash panel. The dash panel from the Special has one extra added hole that I will have to weld up, but overall is in much better condition than the original Century dash panel.

 

I then decided that it was time to do some garage organizing and clean up. I removed the stack of parts that I had been taking up a lot of space on my work bench recently. I organized the boxes of Buick parts a bit and stacked all of the window moldings and dash panel together so I can hopefully do some metal repair and woodgraining soon. I cleaned up my workbench and the back area of the garage where I am doing the restoration. After cleaning and sweeping the area, I now have a nice area to work on the Buick project again.

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This morning, I had a short time available to work on the Buick. I decided to get started on the dash panel. A previous owner had drilled a large extra hole in the dash for an aftermarket starter button. I really don't like incorrect switches or buttons or extra holes in the face of a car dash. My father was a welder. I do have a small wire feed welder but  I am certainly not a talented welder. I welded a washer to the back side of the hole, turned the panel over, and managed to add a fairly ugly puddle of weld to fill up the smaller hole in the washer and fill the larger hole up to bring the surrounding area up to the level of the section of the dash. I then was able to use an angle grinder, followed up with an orbital sander to level the surface area of the repaired area of the dash. I then sanded the entire face of the dash panel, cleaned it up and applied a coat of dark gray primer to the dash. 

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The window moldings on a Century have different decorative trim than the windows moldings on a Special, so I am attempting to repair the Century window moldings so that the car will be correct. The Special moldings are in great shape, but the 20+ years outside in Massachusetts resulted in a bit of rust damage to the Century's window moldings.

 

This morning, I cleaned up most of the window moldings. Three of the moldings have significant rust damage. I repaired one of them today. First I cleaned up all of the rust with a wire wheel, sandpaper and steel wood. At this point, I decided to take some photos, so the "before" photos are after the initial clean up.  I then welded up the rusted out holes. My welding technique is not very good. My typical technique is start to weld on the lowest setting on my wirefeed welder, manage to burn a larger hole in the thin rusty area surrounding the original small hole. Build up a large thick puddle of ugly weld. Spend more time using an angle grinder to get rid of the pile of weld, touch up any missed points with the welder, grind down the new pile of metal, and eventually get to the point that I can sand it. Finally, clean it up and spray it with primer. The after photos are not that good, but I think you will at least be able to see that I managed to get rid of the rusted out holes in the moldings. 

 

I finished one today. Tomorrow, I will have to take the day off from the Buick project as I plan to attend the funeral of a local AACA Chapter member tomorrow morning. 

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Get some copper (I had some pieces of tubing laying around, split it, and flattened) back up the holes you are welding with the copper. The weld won't stick to the copper, and it takes a lot of the heat so the edges of the hole don't burn away.

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1 hour ago, wyankee said:

Get some copper (I had some pieces of tubing laying around, split it, and flattened) back up the holes you are welding with the copper. The weld won't stick to the copper, and it takes a lot of the heat so the edges of the hole don't burn away.

 

I did the first one the hard way. That is one reason why I stopped after one. After I got started, I was determined to finish it but knew that I needed to find something to back it up for the other ones. I will try to find some scrap copper pieces today so I can do the other two without having to work so hard on them.

57 minutes ago, 39BuickEight said:

Something like that is a perfect spot to use allmetal. 

 

That might be a good backup plan but I really like the idea of real steel being there. I grew up in my father's machine shop, but never wanted to let him teach me to weld because I figured I would end up working in that shop for the rest of my life. I am glad I did not continue his line of work, but I do wish I had let him teach me to weld. He taught welding in the local community college for many years.

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Yesterday, I spent some time watching a few welding videos online. I found one tip that helped. It seems odd, but using a bit higher heat setting, with short bursts, and giving it a little bit of cooling time between welds in the same general area actually burns through quite a bit less on the thin metal pieces, both with or without any copper backing. Today, with using a higher heat section and with a couple of days of practice and after watching the online videos,  I found my welding technique to have improved a bit. I finished one window molding and got the last one mostly repaired. The last one was the worst one. The last few photos show the "before" and "during" condition of repairing the two rusted out sections of that window molding.  

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