Trulyvintage

Trailer Suspension Upgrade For Tandem & Triple Axle Leaf Spring Systems

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If you build a trailer with tandem or triple axles and choose a leaf spring suspension - get a spread axle design instead of a conventional system using equalizers & shackle straps. 

If you have a conventional system - consider upgrading to a Lippert Equa-Flex System: 

@ https://www.lci1.com/equa-flex 

I just put this system on my triple axle trailer along with new leaf springs & the shackle strap & bolt upgrade kit. 


Jim 

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Each morning it seems I find a trailer parked next to mine that I can learn from (if only I bother to look) ... 

This morning there was a triple axle enclosed trailer - note the angle of the equalizer shackle straps: 

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This is what happens when your shackle straps are oriented in a near vertical position .... 

This shackle strap is just about to break from being hammered .... 

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The constant hammering up & down causes the shackle bolts to oval out the softer surrounding metal - that leads to suspension component failure .... 

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I purchased my parts at Redneck Trailer Supply but you can get the best deal at e-trailer - just call & make sure the part(s) are in before you place & pay for an order .... 

For a tandem axle 3000 to 6000 pound axle trailer: 

Equalizer kit @ https://www.etrailer.com/Trailer-Suspension/Lippert-Components/LC1594011.html?fe ed=npn&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI2JeimefK1QIVkFp-Ch0ndAGTEAQYASABEgKF8PD_BwE 

Suspension upgrade kit @ https://www.etrailer.com/Trailer-Suspension/Lippert-Components/LC281285.html 
 

 

Jim

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Jim,

I did not go with the "equa-flex" system, but I did get a kit from Etrailer with an extended (2" more) equalizer. heavier shackles,  polyurethane bushings, and grease able bolts.

When I disassembled my BRAND NEW trailer suspension, I found the springs to be under a LOT of sideways tension. Man, they were really out of line !!!

When I reassembled the 2 axles, I loosened the springs on the axle plate and aligned the tires with an 6 foot straight edge.

I also had the tires balanced, which my local tire shop thought was silly, but they did it anyway.

 

Now my  24' trailer sits about 3" higher in the back, so less scraping going into the gas stations, and she tracks a lot better with no noticeable tire scuffing in the 6K miles we have on her.

 

Mike in Colorado

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Mike,

 

i would suggest you you take a look at your shackle straps when your trailer is sitting empty & level as I outlined above.

 

Many trailers come new from the factory not set up correctly.

 

 

Jim

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Jim,

My shackles are custom made of 4140 CrMo steel and are 5/16" thick and 3/4" shorter than standard.

Made by a 4x4 rock crawling Jeep builder here in B.V.

Mike

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It's sad but true that MOST trailers built today are terrible as far as fit, finish, and welding go. Nothing seems to be square, and much of the steel seems to be very poor quaility. Recently I saw a trailer that sold for 28k, and I said to the owner, hey.....the ramp door is too light and flimsy to drive a V-12 Packard on. He called the factory direct, gave the vin number of the trailer, and the engineer said it was fine........I disagreed, then I watched them drive the BIG 12 up the ramp, until it collapsed and damaged the car. It was a MAJOR name brand trailer, more expensive than most, and their premium line. I don't trust any trailer new or used until I go over the entire rig, and fix all the shortcuts they build into them. It's sad nothing in America today is built with pride and craftsmanship. Everyone wants a cheap trailer.......ad that's what they are building. 

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Hi Ben .

Yup, good old Buena Vista, Colorado.

elevation 8500'

 

Mike

 

PS; I used to call on a small foundry in W.F. Tx that made oil well bombs. Drop em down the drill pipe and they would blow the bit right off the end.

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17 hours ago, FLYER15015 said:

I also had the tires balanced, which my local tire shop thought was silly, but they did it anyway.

 

I always have my trailer tires balanced.  I do not want an unbalanced tire(s) to shake the trailer suspension apart along with the trailer and load.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)

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Off the vehicle spin balance is my preference.  The reason is that if the tire is ever taken off the trailer it would need to be re-installed in the exact position or you would have an out of balance condition. 

 

On vehicle balancing works only if the tire is never taken off the vehicle. 

 

Tough if you rotate tires.  Every rotate would require a rebalance of all wheels.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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