oldcar

Early 1920s Studebaker ?

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Thank you RBK

I have (I hope) bought the key on the second link. I rarely if ever look at eBay.

Last time I had a locksmith cut a key from the lock it cost over $100. At $24.90 this one is a bargain.

 

Bj,

 

 

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Wow Bernie, I would never have thought it would be so relatively easy to find the correct key for a car that's almost 100 years old!

 

I haven't posted much, but am following this thread with much interest.

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59a255135ad39_Escargot04.thumb.jpg.692f2ab3372ab7a407a799f16e3ead0c.jpgHi Paul

You are not the only one that did not think it would be so easy. Remember that I have only owned the Studebaker since August 5th so I have a very long way to go. I am waiting to get the wheels back and painted so I can fit some new tyres. Only then I will be able to move it and start work on it seriously. First thing will be to see if I can free the motor without tearing it all apart. Before I can do this I have to repair the dog for the crank handle, to do this I will need top remove the timing case before I can do that I have to remove the radiator etc. I do not want to start on that until it is back on it's wheels.  This afternoon's project is to remove some if not all the accumulation of dirt and rubbish from the splash trays on either side of the motor, This for some unknown reason includes dozens of snail shells.

Perhaps they were put there in an attempt to make L'escargot.

 

Bernie j.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
  • Haha 1

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On 8/7/2017 at 5:55 PM, oldcar said:

Thank you everyone for your interest in my latest purchase, hopefully this one is a "keeper".

The Studebaker will be delivered hopefully tomorrow. I will then have a much better idea of what I am looking at. For all those who do not know me

I live in East Doncaster, a suburb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. I am now slightly more than 80 years old. I have been an "old car" enthusiast since I was a  small boy. I do virtually all the mechanical work and some body work and trim myself. I have been an active contributor to the AACA Forum since I joined the club when restoring the Dixie Flyer Firefly Speedster in 2008

http://forums.aaca.org/topic/120541-dixie-flyer-firefly-speedster-photographs/

 

As mentioned earlier I am looking for a combined ignition and light switch and possibly a "dumb iron cover/apron"

 

Bernie j.

Bernie.

We are the same age!

I was born on October 10 1936.

I love reading this post.

Scott (Lightsix on this forum) brought a trailer load of parts for early Studebakers

Mostly light six parts.

I already had many parts from that era from 50 years of hoarding.

The only parts I ever scrapped were the ones that I received requests for a week

later. So I quit scrapping parts. My son owns a 38.000sq/ft building that is packed full.

 

Email me if you need parts.I am old and slow ,so please have patience.

Robert Kapteyn

studebaker@mac.com

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10 hours ago, rbk said:

I am old and slow ,so please have patience.

Hello Robt. 

You have just committed two sins in the one sentence!

Never admit to either your age or how if may effect your speed over the ground.

There already too many people who will be willing to point it out to you.

 

We have a saying down here in Australia:-

                                                                     Keep on keeping on!

 

Bj.

59a38c9745dd3_RapieratWinton_826.thumb.jpg.80de8790675e3480789965ee2f89b588.jpg

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Now  a question to other Light Six owners or anyone else who may be interested.

I have to buy some (5) new tires for the Stude before I can move it, It had 500 X 24 tires on it presumably since 1941 or some time before then. They were so hard and out of shape as to be useless.  I can order some new 500 X 24 but they will not be available for some eight to ten weeks or I can get  four 400 X 24 now.  Can any of the people reading this tell me which of these two sizes were the correct size for the Light Six in the 1920's. My owners hand book does not specify a tire size.

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10 hours ago, oldcar said:

Now  a question to other Light Six owners or anyone else who may be interested.

I have to buy some (5) new tires for the Stude before I can move it, It had 500 X 24 tires on it presumably since 1941 or some time before then. They were so hard and out of shape as to be useless.  I can order some new 500 X 24 but they will not be available for some eight to ten weeks or I can get  four 400 X 24 now.  Can any of the people reading this tell me which of these two sizes were the correct size for the Light Six in the 1920's. My owners hand book does not specify a tire size.

The Standard Catalog says 32 x 4 - a size shared with the bigger Special Six. Seems skinny by today's standards - for a biggish car. The later EM is quoted as 31 x 4. 32 x 4 is also the size the Mercer Raceabout uses. A common size at that time?

 

Saw this Fiat Balilla on the weekend. It is on 4.00/4.25 x 17s - they look skinny but I think correct for the car, which is Oz owned and has been to Mille Miglia.

IMG_8259.JPG

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I too would have expected the older sizing system (outer diameter) to be in use when that car was built. 32x4 is likely correct.

 

On the other hand, I might be tempted to get the taller ones.

Edited by Bloo
.. (see edit history)

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The taller tires will give you more miles at less rpm.  The question is how much will you be driving the car.  In my case I put the tallest that I could get because the car was my daily driver and I put about a thousand miles a month on it.  The smaller tires will be easier on the engine (marginally).  If it is to be judged you should use the correct size if available and it appears that not only are they available they are available now.  Your choice of course but I would go for the correct size and have tires on the car sooner.

Happy motoring.

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Thank you all for your valued opinions.

I have now gone ahead and bought the 24 X 4.00 as these seem to be the correct tire for this model. The Budd Wire wheels are 24 inch so they are one inch taller than the standard woodspoke 23 inch if my reading is correct. I will have to wait now until I have them fitted and the car standing on them.

 

Bj

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32 x 4 is correct per the parts manual.1504055917217-885610791.thumb.jpg.c9d8d3af3a017af6aea1d394258fb434.jpg

Most likely BF Goodrich Silvertons. Check out this original photo of a 1920-21 Light Six on the Shorpy site (Shorpy has some great photos...I need to buy some to help support them).

http://www.shorpy.com/node/19827

Besides the manufacturer, you can make out 32 x 4 on the front tire if you look hard.

 

This was a South Bend built car so has a few differences in the body vs yours built in Walkerville. Primary in the hood/cowl area but lots more similarities. Too bad we can't see under the hood:).

Scott

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All the Light Six tires were on 24 inch rims regardless of the wheel type until 1923 when the wire wheels went to 25 inches and the disc and wood wheels went to 23 inches. Even more changes happened in 1924. 

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It all sounds a bit like Australia at the present time where we are going through the run up to a postal vote by all registered voters (Australia wide) on Same Sex Marriage.

I also have a similar problem with my 1934 Lagonda Rapier which apart from having three totally different bodies in its life time has been standing (and running) on 17 inch wheels since the late 1940s. It has 450/500 X 17 tyres that have very nearly the same rolling diameter as 440 X 19 which were the original issue in 1934. Except that there were less than 400 cars built, the factory built any bodies on Rapier Chassis and it was left to the original customer and his choice of coach-builder to decide on a number of things possibly including the final wheel size. It has had the body and wheels currently fitted since 1978.  See also photograph on #82.

All that aside as the Studebaker is so original I will endeavour to keep it that way.  With that in view at some time in the past someone has removed for some unknown and unaccountable reason removed the cresent moulding from around the waist line.  This leaves a row of little (1/8") holes, some of these have been filled in. Unfortunately in removing this they paint has been damaged right around the car. This can be rectified easily enough by a competent painter, my question today is did this cresent mould (beading) appear on other Light Sixes or was it a peculiar feature limited just one or a few cars?

 

59a639b680f4f_DSCN5608(1).thumb.jpg.7c25a28e1973d4a7b087f4cdd024590b.jpgDSCN5607.thumb.jpg.c35dcccd4b93b4e60672934b1726921d.jpg

 

Bernie j.

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I have a 1924 EM light six coupe parts carcass. It has an aluminum belt molding in the same place as your car has holes. Do you know what the original molding was?

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I looked through the parts manual and reviewed all the Light Six Touring car photos I have, which includes a fair number of export cars.  None have this "molding strip" so I suggest that it was either originally installed at final assembly in country or added at some point.  Based on that I would say it was a limited feature that may be only on a few cars. 

 

The Light Six Coupe had a much narrower molding strip between the top and body - perhaps what Studeboy references?

1922rear.thumb.jpg.94abc3ed024b411f8b581ca6121255df.jpg59a6ab0d02d77_1924LightSixCoupe.JPG.4bf75cb1051644eafd253e377ff4138f.JPG

 

 

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Hello

For some reason aluminium "Crescent" mould, as it is known here in Australia, has become difficlut to find. It used to be available in a number of widths. In the past I have used it on a number of restorations. I may be able to buy a similar moulding in brass but have to  check the widths available. I would prefer to replace it rather than fill the holes and paint over them. I really do not want to strip off all the original paint. While at present the paint could be best described as scruffy it adds to the authenticity of the car. I am hoping that any repairs to the paintwork can be kept to a minimum.  I am having the wheels sand blasted and repainted (black) because most of the original paint had been replaced with a light coating of rust.

 

Bernie j.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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DSCN5610.thumb.jpg.a9f291938b8da9c7eb39d816b725ffe3.jpgI believe that in all probability it was aluminium. Wood would have required steam bending while not impossible perhaps a little unusual.

 

On a different front; this morning I was successful in buying, an original Briggs & Stratton Ignition key with the correct #39 combination, on eBay. Another small box ticked.

 

Bj

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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I believe that in all probability it was aluminium. Wood would have required steam bending while not impossible perhaps a little unusual.

Further to this, I have now found a source for Aluminium Crescent Mould 15.8 mm (5/8th inch) wide which should be just about right. 

I will follow this up early next week.

Meanwhile I should be getting the newly painted wheels back on next Wednesday so things are starting to move. 

 

Bj

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On 8/31/2017 at 9:51 PM, oldcar said:

 

 

On a different front; this morning I was successful in buying, an original Briggs & Stratton Ignition key with the correct #39 combination, on eBay. Another small box ticked.

 

Bj

322677479460_1.jpg.26292192adbc781db99152fc4d06b90b.jpg

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Bernie, re the key.  Success comes in small doses.  Now comes the real test, will it unlock that old lock.  Hope that the innards are not pot metal and have swollen tight all these years.  Enjoying having you back at work.  Makes my old car day.

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51 minutes ago, unimogjohn said:

Bernie..........Enjoying having you back at work.  Makes my old car day.

 

Mine too. When I grow up I want to be just like Bernie. :)  (Now, if I could only pare down to two old cars to work on like Bernie I'd be way better off.)

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