oldcar

Early 1920s Studebaker ?

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Hello Gary 
Once the car is at home it is not a problem, There may even be a wheel spanner in the car beneath the pile of bits in the rear seat.

I suspect that the valve is torn out of the tube. Right now I have a slightly bigger problem, Ian my friendly tow truck driver is, as of last night in hospital with a problem with one of his replacement heart valves. He expects the valve grind job to take two or three days, having said that he is keen to do the job himself as he too owns a 1920's Studebaker.

At least this gives me some extra time to clean out the space that the car will go into.

 

Thank you Scott,

I will follow up the link to the manuals, again with the car at home I can check out the fuse box cover.

 

Bernie j.

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Thank you  Scott

I have now bought the manual on eBay and should have it in a week or so.

 

Hello Gary

The Dixie Flyer had the same wheels and hub caps, I had a spanner for it but that went with the car to Kentucky Trailer (originally in 1860s, the Kentucky Wagon Co) in Louisville Ky.

 

Bernie j

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Having just spoken with my friendly Tow-truck operator he now out of hospital and will pick up and deliver the Studebaker on Tuesday morning.

 

Bj

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Hello again Gary

Finally I have the Studebaker safely at home, The five tires are all rock hard and I doubt that regardless of the ability of the tubes to hold air they will change shape very much. Among the "stuff" left in a box in the rear of the car was a wheel spanner along with a few other trinkets. The "chassis plate" is still where it belongs under the left hand side front mudguard (fender). The cover for the fuse box was on the front floor. The cars is now lifted and standing on jack-stands ready for me to remove the wheels. Once the tires are removed the wheels can go to be sand blasted prior to repainting "Belgium Blue", or should they be Black? Right now they are an overall rust & dirt colour.

While a minor detail, it is disappointing  that the cresent moulding from around the waistline of the car has been removed. Hopefully it can be replaced with new brass strip. Much of the "gold" pinstriping is actually still intact.

The "serial number" is the same as on the registration label on the windscreen with the addition of 100 prefix making it 1002350.

The "spare" cylinder head has had some serious repairs so hopefully the one on the car is OK. More pleasing was the discovery of the four name plates from the centre of the hub-caps.

I can see that I will have my work cut-out for me for quite some time to come. Please don't go away, this my first venture into Studebakers and I have a lot to learn. At least unlike some of my earlier projects this one is relatively complete and unmolested.

 

Bernie j.

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Here we go again, off and running.

Having attempted to push the Studebaker about alone and unaided, I decided that it really did need some better tires before It would roll easily.

That was at about 9.30 this morning. It is now four forty five. Lunch time was extended to watch a French horror movie on midday TV. That and the fact that I had to cut one tire off accounts for the time taken. The six wheels can now go off to my friendly sand blaster's in the morning

 

Bj.

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This is a great car, I saw it when it was advertised on Gumtree. I think the "oily" rag approach is ideal for this car. I certainly look forward to watching your progress in recommissioning her.

 

Cheers

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Probably the most daunting aspect of bringing it back from the "brink" is the upholstery. There is just enough left to see how it was done. Unfortunately It will probably also be the most expensive job needing to be done. I still have to collect the hood (top) which I imagine will be in tatters too.

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Your serial number of 1002350 would make the car 1920. According to the figures in The Standard Catalog, the EJ numbers started at 1000001 and went to 1035002. The 1920 EJ series was introduced in April 1920 and there were about 7,000 cars. There were about 28,000 1921 series  cars. Your number would put your car quite early in the series - maybe mid 1920? No engine number info available apparently.

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I do hope that you are not too offended by the sight of them, I have owned and used them for a very long time. I am not about to "bin" them. They only have to last another 20 years to see my 100th Birthday. I probably will not use them very much after then!

 

Bj

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Some more (boring?) facts.  Production of the Light 6 was scheduled to start on January 1st,1920 but material shortages and a lack of available rail transport delayed it until April 30th, 1920.  Starting serial number has already been noted above, starting engine number was literally 1 and went to 202,500 for all cars to the end of EM production in 1924.  Serial number plate is on the left frame rail behind the front wheel, which is a bad location as it can be knocked off by rocks thrown up by the front wheel, engine number left side of block opposite number 6 cylinder.  Your car is very early production - maybe the earliest known survivor?  Also as noted above Studebaker paid little attention to annual model changes, preferring to do it when they felt it was necessary.  There are two right hand drive Canadian assembled 1926 Standard Sixes in British Columbia, a roadster and a sedan.  The roadster was originally shipped to Hong Kong and the sedan to New South Wales, Australia.  There are noticeable differences between them and domestically produced cars.  

 

Terry

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Thank You Terry

What is of real interest is your suggestion that my Studebaker could be the "earliest known surviving Light Six"

Changing the subject ever so slightly, I have just purchased via the internet a copy of the original "information on the care and operation" While completely intact it is obviously well read although somewhat disappointingly there are no entries in the ten pages devoted to memoranda at the back of the book, nor is there a section devoted to magneto ignition. In fact there is no mention of a magneto. None the less if I am to learn even one thing from it, it is money well spent. 

 

Bj.

 

 

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Can any one please tell me definitely where the engine number is actually located. I can only find one likely site on the left side of the block high up next to Number six exhaust port. The problem is that I cannot clearly make out what the number, if there is one, is? The casting date as seen in the third photograph is 9-14-20 i.e..  9th month 14th day 1920. The casting number is 43151   1. In the photograph the first digit (4) of the number is accidently cut off. At this point my camera battery decided to become "exhausted". I now have it on charge but that will take a little time

Is there a Studebaker Historian who can decipher any of this for me?

 

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Hello NZCarnerd,

I had seen photographs of that "beauty" before, it reminded me NOT to paint my car yellow with red wheels. I think that the original Black mudguards (fenders) with Belgium Blue up to the waist line then Black above it, suits my car. I still have to decide whether to paint my wheels the same Belgium Blue as the body colour or Black. I have  found traces of both colours on different wheels on the car.

 

Hi OnSafari.  

The inlet manifold is a three forked passage cast into the cylinder head, the gas passes into the block behind the valves through three transfer ports so there are six separate exhaust ports and three siamesed inlet ducts/ports The order of the valves is  from front to back, E-I-I-E-E-I-I-E-E-I-I-E

The exhaust manifold shows this spacing clearly in the drawing below. The carburettor is mounted on the other (right) side of the cylinder head. In cold climates hot air is drawn from around the exhaust manifold through the duct across to the carburettor. i.e. via the " Carburettor Hot Air Stove".

 

 

Bernie j.

 

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On my 1922 Light Six the engine serial number is stamped into the block by the starter. I haven't looked at it in a few years to be more specific. I think it is on a flat surface along side the starter if my memory serves me correctly.

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Thank you studeboy

 

My next option was to remove the starter motor so I could throughly examine that area on the side of the block. It is a bit too late to start tonight (9.45 pm).

 

More tomorrow

 

Bj.

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Thank you Stude Light

I have just had a quick look and there is a number stamped exactly where you suggest. It is going to take a little more cleaning before I can read it.  Without having the engine out I doubt I would have found it without your help. With 97 years of build up of dirt and oil it would have been impossible to find without knowing precisely where to look.

 

Bernie j

 

 

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