oldcar

Early 1920s Studebaker ?

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Surprise surprise!

I have sold the "Light Six" and it is to go to England. Any of the Eager Beavers who monitor the Studebaker section of the PrewarCar website would have been aware that I had it advertised for sale. After being given the "run around" by a couple of time wasters I believe that this "buyer" is genuine. I simply found it was too big and heavy for me to move around unaided. So I would like to go back to my first "love" and look for an "early Vintage (Pre 1925) light car" (under 10 horsepower). I would like to thank all the people who were so helpful and supportive. Having gone through one lot of Spinal-surgery I did not want to go down that path again.

 

Thank you all

 

Bernie j.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Congratulations!  That didn't take very long and, hopefully, this will relieve some of the stress you have recently endured.  So how much does it cost to ship a car to England from Australia and how long does that typically take?

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Usually about Aust $4,500 and 45days plus clearance time in port of arrival. I have suggested that the buyer keep in touch with the Forum.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you all for all the support and helpful advice.

 

Bernie j.

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While here in Australia we are by now well intoNew Years Day some of you across the Globe are still enjoying New Years Eve

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the people who have been so incredibly helpful and supportive. 

May the New Year bring you all Health, Wealth & Happiness.

 

 Cheers

 

Bernie j. 

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Thank you Bernie! And Happy New Year to you and your wife and family. 

 

I will continue to follow your Loganda thread on the British Car page. :)

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Thank you Paul

We have been spending the New Year and some extra days with my sister who lives on the coast at Point Lonsdale.

I trust that you and all the other contributors to this thread have had an enjoyable holiday and are looking froward to another Happy Year.

I have suggested to the new owner of the Light Six that he continue on with this thread.

If you would like to welcome him (David Chappell) to the ranks of the Studebaker fraternity his email is  dr.chappell@btinternet.com

Thank you

Bernie j

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This one is for Scott.

One final question. What is the significance of the number 2657 stamped into the left hand side of the bulkhead just to the side of the oil can and above the horn mounting bracket. Thank you for all your assistance. I believe that David Chappell has been in contact with you.

 

Bernie j. 

DSCN5794.thumb.jpg.62dd5e2daeb7e393adfdc5121026f435.jpg

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Hi Bernie,

Yes, Dave got in touch with me. I'm sure he is eager for the arrival of the car. Besides the long boat ride, he'll have to deal with customs which, hopefully, will go smoothly.

 

I do not know what the number on the bulkhead was for. It was probably used to track the bodies but its significance has long been lost to history. My Budd built body had a tag on it with a number but, again, no meaning as all that documentation has been destroyed long ago. I was finally able to locate the approximate location where the Walkerville Studebaker plant was located...not much record of that. The building was torn down a long time ago but it is where all the right hand drive cars were built and was acquired by Studebaker in 1910 from Everitt-Metzger-Flanders and supplied all the cars for the British Empire until it was closed after WWII which is when they opened the Hamilton, Ontario plant (1947).

 

Glad you were able to collect some history and all the pieces for the car (folding top in particular) and pass the torch to another enthused owner. Good luck on the other projects have fun with that Lagonda.

Scott

 

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4 hours ago, Stude Light said:

Hi Bernie,

Yes, Dave got in touch with me. I'm sure he is eager for the arrival of the car. Besides the long boat ride, he'll have to deal with customs which, hopefully, will go smoothly.

 

I do not know what the number on the bulkhead was for. It was probably used to track the bodies but its significance has long been lost to history. My Budd built body had a tag on it with a number but, again, no meaning as all that documentation has been destroyed long ago. I was finally able to locate the approximate location where the Walkerville Studebaker plant was located...not much record of that. The building was torn down a long time ago but it is where all the right hand drive cars were built and was acquired by Studebaker in 1910 from Everitt-Metzger-Flanders and supplied all the cars for the British Empire until it was closed after WWII which is when they opened the Hamilton, Ontario plant (1947).

 

Glad you were able to collect some history and all the pieces for the car (folding top in particular) and pass the torch to another enthused owner. Good luck on the other projects have fun with that Lagonda.

Scott

 

Just curious - re your comment about all of the right hand drive cars coming from Walkerville. I had always thought with our 3rd series GE (NZ new with rhd) that the serial number suggested it came from South Bend, I don't have the number handy at the moment - I will have to check it again at the weekend..

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My understanding is that some parts of the cars were built in other plants, then shipped to Walkerville where various localized content was added to the cars which now made them British built and allowed them to be imported into other countries with a reduction in import tariffs.  The details of this practice are mostly lost so it is difficult to say just what the practice was for each model. I'm sure Studebaker would take every advantage possible to reduce the price of their vehicles so it would make sense to use this process wherever possible.  Another thing that I don't know is just how much content did you need.  Could you build a car in South Bend or Detroit, ship it to Walkerville and install the seats and call it British built?  I'm sure they had some rules. This definitely explains why the exported cars have content that was different from their domestic counterparts. I've sent a lot of parts globally and end up with photos of people's cars and I've seen differences in bodies, tops, windshields, colors, engines, etc. on these export cars.

 

So to answer your question...I don't know.

Scott

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Don't look now but when you have a moment go to International Makes & Models<Italian> 1922 Fiat 

 

Cheers!

 

Bj.

 

 

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