Recommended Posts

I believe you are talking about a "flat-head 8" or an "L head 8".  These were the only 8 cylinder engines built by Chrysler until the advent of the OHV V8's.  A "Flat 8" would be a horizontally opposed engine or could be called a pancake engine. 

see attachments.

engine type.jpg

pancake.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know about the flat 8, we have 10 of these engines from 1930 to 48. 1933 Dodge DO was the last car to have a flat 8 under the Dodge name. What I was referring to is the export, 1938 Dodge having the flat 8.

Thanks for the info. Great info.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was surprised that they sold a Dodge Eight in England, there was no such car sold in North America in 1938. Unless it was a rebadged Chrysler New Yorker?

 

The artist responsible for the first ad's illustration did a good job of buttering up the rather dowdy Dodge.

 

Later.... the closest thing to the Dodge Eight is the 1938 Chrysler O-C-19 with 4894.8cc engine and 122 in wheelbase.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Spinneyhill said:

Supposedly it was a badge engineering job. What was the base car?

What you see is what was printed.

 

14 minutes ago, Rusty_OToole said:

I was surprised that they sold a Dodge Eight in England, there was no such car sold in North America in 1938. Unless it was a rebadged Chrysler New Yorker?

 

The artist responsible for the first ad's illustration did a good job of buttering up the rather dowdy Dodge.

 

Later.... the closest thing to the Dodge Eight is the 1938 Chrysler O-C-19 with 4894.8cc engine and 122 in wheelbase.

Have 2 parts car. Both flat 8s. One with OD and the other a 3 speed. 

38 chry 38 dodge  11-27-2012 013.JPG

teens-20s parts spare tire covers and holders 026.JPG

38 chry 38 dodge  11-27-2012 005.JPG

38 chry 38 dodge  11-27-2012 006.JPG

38 chry 38 dodge  11-27-2012 008.JPG

38 chry 38 dodge  11-27-2012 009.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Rusty_OToole said:

The one out in the yard is badged Chrysler Imperial and the other looks the same?

Look at the model numbers. One is a C19 Imperial and the other is a C20 Custom Imperial

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look at those (1938) prices. L385 = $1925 and L585 = $2925. More than twice as much as the same cars sold for in the US. Mind you they came with English leather interiors which must have  cost a few quid.

 

MSRP 1937 Dodge touring sedan $790

             1938 Chrysler C19 Imperial Eight touring sedan $1198 according to NADA

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rusty...Sorry to disagree about a Dodge flat head 8.  See this posting under Dodge.    These were also sold in Canada.  My "Best Man" owned a 1930 like the green one at the bottom of this post way back in 1963.  Too bad that countrytravler has a problem with accepted terminology (these engines are "flat head 8's" or "L head 8"s") I have never seen any Chrysler information that referred to them as a flat 8.  They certainly are not a pancake, horizontally opposed or boxer style (therefore not flat) they are vertical as were all WPC engines until the OHV V8's, excepting of course the 30 cylinder flat head tank engine of WWII.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We're not disagreeing. I know perfectly well they made a straight eight Dodge in the early thirties but production was stopped long before 1938. According to the pictures and specs in the road test the closest match is a 1938 C19 Imperial.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My apologies Rusty.  I was not aware that straight 8's were not available all the way through.  Of course what can you expect from a GM guy and a Canuck to boot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The "straight eight" was offered in Dodge starting in 1930 and was only used or offered for four years - 1930, 1931, 1932 and 1933.  From 1934 on there were no eights offered in the Dodge until the V-8 in the 1950's. Not sure exact year they started with a V8.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First Dodge V8 was the 1953 model. They introduced them in order of size cost or prestige of the car they went in. Chrysler - 1951, DeSoto - 1952, Dodge - 1953,  Plymouth - 1955. The Plymouth may have been delayed by the Korean war, for a time there was talk in Washington  of freezing all new model development but this was never implemented.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/29/2017 at 10:51 PM, 35cz8 said:

The "straight eight" was offered in Dodge starting in 1930 and was only used or offered for four years - 1930, 1931, 1932 and 1933.  From 1934 on there were no eights offered in the Dodge until the V-8 in the 1950's. Not sure exact year they started with a V8.

The 33 DO was the last year for the Dodge 8 and it was dropped at the beginning of the year because of sales. Info from our library books. That is why I posted the article above that Chrysler would badge a Chrysler to a Dodge with a flat head 8.

The 8s were used in the following models. I believe that the 4 years of the 8 shared a lot of parts. I just sold a 33 cam shaft for a 30. It is the same part number.

DC-1930

DG-1931

DK-1932

DO-1933

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/28/2017 at 11:18 PM, Tinindian said:

Rusty...Sorry to disagree about a Dodge flat head 8.  See this posting under Dodge.    These were also sold in Canada.  My "Best Man" owned a 1930 like the green one at the bottom of this post way back in 1963.  Too bad that countrytravler has a problem with accepted terminology (these engines are "flat head 8's" or "L head 8"s") I have never seen any Chrysler information that referred to them as a flat 8.  They certainly are not a pancake, horizontally opposed or boxer style (therefore not flat) they are vertical as were all WPC engines until the OHV V8's, excepting of course the 30 cylinder flat head tank engine of WWII.

 

 

No problem with the terminology. In 5 years and 6k plus post, you're the only one that complained or just being funny. LOL! Were good. With running 3 business and a lot of info articles, I'll shorten words up. Not retired and spending a lot of time on the boards. 

SO!! Have a great Flat Head 8 day.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now