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Constant velocity joint question

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Has anybody rebuilt a cv joint in a '65 Riv? Is it a pain in the A**? Or does anybody want to sell me a good one? My rear most is clunky. I removed the drive shaft to lube it. 3 of the 5 u-joints are installed backwards (not by me).  So it's a pain to lube them. Can't do it in the car. Then I discovered the cv joint. Any help would be great. Tried a search just found one mention. 

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                    CARS sells all the parts needed to rebuild your driveshaft. If you can't do it any driveshaft shop could handle the job.

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Just don't let ANY shop tell you the shaft is "Out of phase" as they are supposed to be from the factory at 67 1/2*

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2 hours ago, telriv said:

Just don't let ANY shop tell you the shaft is "Out of phase" as they are supposed to be from the factory at 67 1/2*

 

telriv, please explain in detail and what is 67 1/2*?

Edited by Paul K. (see edit history)

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Sorry Paul this ole guy typing with one finger would take me all day. Only suggestion I can make is get a chassis manual.

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I replaced all five of my u-joints right before I left for the Buick Nationals in Sandusky. The CV balls were fine. The joint cross won't come out like a normal one and I had to cut it with a torch. The rest is straight forward.

Cadillac CV driveshafts are described as non-ervicable and to be replaced as a unit. I believe that. I took a '67 Caddy driveshaft back to a specialty shop three times before I picked up a good used one. The repaired one leaned in a corner of my garage for close to 20 years before I through it out.

Bernie

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When all the ujoint caps are in line in a multi piece driveshaft it is described as being "in phase". This "phasing" directly relates to vibration because as a ujoint travels thru an angle one side is operating faster than the other. When multiple ujoints are properly phased this difference in acceleration is canceled out and therefore cancels the associated vibration.

Normally proper phasing is obtained by lining up the ujoint caps on the same plane but the Riv driveshaft is unorthodox as compared to industry standards because the phasing is at 67 1/2 degrees. It is a common mistake in shops to phase the driveline per industry standards and not as per Buick specs.

IMHO Buick never did get the driveline "right" and the factory setup is the best compromise. This is especially aggravated and brought to light when the rear mosr driveline angle at the diff is extreme as in a "sagging" set of rear springs. This is easily troubleshooted or temporarily "fixed" with air adjustable rear shocks.

  When I used to drive my `65`s to the meets back in the day the trunk was always loaded and the driveline would present an annoying resonant vibration at certain highway speeds. I installed a set of rear air shocks so I could adjust the ride height,and therefore the rear driveline angle, to the proper height and the vibration would disappear.

Hope this helps

  Tom Mooney

PS  A common method to deal with extreme driveline angles is to use a CV joint as in front wheel drive axles. Interesting to note that Buick added a CV joint to their driveline from the `63 to the `64 model years. Hmmm...

Edited by 1965rivgs (see edit history)
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13 hours ago, Paul K. said:

 

telriv, please explain in detail and what is 67 1/2*?

 

Untitled.jpg

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Thanks PWB and 1965RivGS for taking the time to reply. 

 

I went through my rearend last fall and had the driveshaft rebuilt while it was out. You guessed it, the shop said it was out of phase so they put it in phase. I haven't driven the car on the freeway yet so I can't say if there is a vibration at higher speeds. 

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3 hours ago, telriv said:

Oh for sure there will be!!!

 

However, the driveshaft being in phase or out of phase is a moot point if the driveshaft were balanced which mine was. 

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16 hours ago, Paul K. said:

 

However, the driveshaft being in phase or out of phase is a moot point if the driveshaft were balanced which mine was. 

Not correct because balancing will be performed with no angles present in the driveline....you might get lucky but doubtful.  Most typical driveline shops do not have the proper setup to do the first gen driveshafts.  Often only a shop which does heavy duty truck rebuiding can handle this complicated driveline....like wrestling with an alligator!

  Tom Mooney

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Thanks Tom for the explanation.

 

I'm curious, that it seems balancing the shaft in a lathe with working angles, would still only be close if a generic angle were applied due ride height differences between cars. This would an incomplete balance unless working angle measurements of the driveshaft installed are taken and then applied to the set up in the balancer. I would thing an off-road shop that does suspension lifts has the ability to do this or works with a driveline shop that can do a proper balance for the Riv. 

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9 hours ago, Paul K. said:

Thanks Tom for the explanation.

 

I'm curious, that it seems balancing the shaft in a lathe with working angles, would still only be close if a generic angle were applied due ride height differences between cars. This would an incomplete balance unless working angle measurements of the driveshaft installed are taken and then applied to the set up in the balancer. I would thing an off-road shop that does suspension lifts has the ability to do this or works with a driveline shop that can do a proper balance for the Riv. 

Whatever driveline angles which are presented during actual operation which result in varying acceleration/deceleration of the yolks are self cancelling if the phasing is correct.

  Tom

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I'd also consider any local reputable 4 wheel drive shops. Lifted trucks run into driveline angle issues, maybe they're familiar with it.

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On ‎7‎/‎21‎/‎2017 at 7:24 AM, 60FlatTop said:

 

Cadillac CV driveshafts are described as non-ervicable and to be replaced as a unit.

Bernie

 

The Buick manual says the same thing!

When I had mine done I took the above diagram and the text that goes along with it to the shop doing the work. It came out fine but there apparently was a lot of cursing during the process.  ;)

 

Steve

Edited by slosteve (see edit history)

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