theterrym

1929 Chevrolet coupe

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Good day everyone. Im Brand new to the forum. Last weekend I picked up my newest project. This is by far the oldest car I have owned. I bought it from a gentleman who purchased the car in 1956 as his first car. In the early 90s he planned on restoring it. He got all of the bumpers chromed and thats as far as he got. They are still wrapped up in newspaper. 

The wood (so far) appears to be in fantastic condition and as far as I can tell there appears to be no rust. As I go im know I will have many questions so I hope there are a few out there that can share their wisdom.

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13 minutes ago, theterrym said:

The wood (so far) appears to be in fantastic condition

 

 

You hit a home run there.  The wood in those is usually suspect. I always liked that year and body style.

 

Glad to see another new member posting on this restoration-forum.  We need more, bring a friend :) 

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Alright, my first questions. The trunk lid doesn't fit flush against the body at the bottom. Nothing is broken or out of sort so im guessing this is how it always was or 90 years of wood drying created this?

Second, the roof is missing trim around the covering. I haven't been able to find any photos for reference of what is supposed to be there. What should be there and does anyone know where to find or what to make it with?

ThanksDSC_9291.thumb.jpg.0d382180e4152f9fd44d23831b02560c.jpgDSC_9294.thumb.jpg.de029a0a01ac322abb0e1cbba97426e1.jpg

 

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3 hours ago, theterrym said:

im guessing this is how it always was or 90 years of wood drying created this?

 

 

Was not like that when new.

 

Most curved side rails for lids in that era, use multiple pieces of shorter wood with finger joints, so that would not happen.. Short pieces resist changing shape over time.  Can you look to see if it is only one long wooden piece to make the curve? or several pieces that maybe have loose joints?

 

 

Trimacar is a member on AACA, he would know your top question, but may not read these resto threads.

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The original was an aluminum extrusion similar to your eaves trough only it didn't have a trough.  When finished it was a shallow half round molding.  When purchased  three quarters of the half round was standing straight up from the base.  To install you nailed the base on (using appropriate sealers and nails) and then swaged the upright part down into the base making a finished job.

I was unable to find the correct molding thirty years ago and just used half round aluminum and installed it with counter sunk screws covered with a dab of body filler.  Since then I have seen the correct molding advertised occasionally.

If you look at the end of your eaves trough you will see that the rounded part on the top is actually bent down into the trough.

There are moldings available for Model A F***s and other cars.  I'm sure your good looking Lady in Black would rather be out playing in traffic with a foreign molding than sitting in the garage just because her roof leaks.

Edited by Tinindian (see edit history)
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Thanks Tinindian for the info and F&J to answer your question the wood rails for the trunk are smaller pieces jointed together, but the joints are all tight. I found the piece that runs along the back bottom does have a crack, but when I clamp it tight and twist a little pressure it does pull the metal in about 1/8" not quite the 1/2" to make a flush seam. Once I take everything apart more mysteries should reveal themselves.  Thanks guys!!

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2 minutes ago, theterrym said:

Once I take everything apart

 

 

The 29/30 Chevy coupes that ended up with wet wood for long term:  The worst place would show up just ahead of the deck lid where the back panel of roof, joins the curved down rear body panel .

 

Those 2 sheet metal panels are not welded to each other, they are nailed to the wood behind.  Many wet cars show separation at that area.

 

.

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That would make perfect sense why everything lines up all the way down, but the very bottom where the curve is the greatest is pushed back. Thats why I love forums. Good answers from folks that know what they are talking about!

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Glad to see you and your '29 Chev coupe here ! I am curious about the condition of the interior. Is the upholstry original ? What condition ? How is the instrument panel ? Also , does it run well now ? Welcome ! You are in the right place. The cumulative brain here  knows virtually everything about cars. A great and generous group !   - Carl 

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59124e680119b__27c.JPG.a0cd659edde096456bc2b381fcb55a4c.JPG59124e759a13e__27d.JPG.1b01c71066dc84d321ed8ba1c3c3d97e.JPG

The Interior is in good shape for being 90 years old. The seat is original with no rips, but pretty worn. The dash was painted in the 50s and door panels were changed. The car runs, but has a bottom end knock. Ill deal with that when The engine comes out. Im not quite sure how im going to tackle that yet.

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that is a sweet survivor nice find! is it original paint or has it had a respray in the past, if original are you going to preserve or go the full restoration route. dont see many chevy coupes around these parts. nice car.

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Nice car!  I have a soft spot for the 29-32 Chevies, my first car (that I still own) in 1964 was a 1931 Chevy tudor.

 

Wood condition always an issue in these cars.  I'd say from the pictures and looking at the applied stripe that it's a repaint, if it was original paint I'd say leave it alone and keep it as is, and in fact, it'd be a lot of fun if you did just that anyway!

 

The description of the trim for the insert top by Tinindian is correct.  When I restored mine in the sixties, nothing was to be found, and I have a piece of half-oval aluminum in place.

 

As to the engine, the original was, of course, Babbitt mains and rods.  One of the problems with rebuilding these is that when the crank is ground, then the Babbitt on the rods has to be thicker to make up the difference.  Babbitt is an awful conductor of heat, so if a rod bearing starts warming up, the Babbitt will tend to start cracking from the heat, and then start to disappear.

 

One weakness of the early six cylinder cars are the rear axle shafts, they tend to break, so just be aware of that.

 

Have fun with it!

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The correct roof edge molding is available from Bob's Memorabilia or the Filling Station. Bob manufactures it and sells it to the FS so I just purchase it from Bob's. I put on a lot of roofs with the aluminum moldings from him. Here's a sample of three different cars all done with Bob's moldings.

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I finally got a good days work in on the 29. Without a doubt the car was built in Oshawa Ontario. I don't know if it was wishful thinking or just being naive, but i figured the wood was going to be in fantastic condition. Turns out most of it needs to be or should be replaced. On the bright side I don't think i will find anymore dead mice. DSC_9322a.thumb.jpg.770294a3ad9392b8f5d60ae7601d57ec.jpgDSC_9339a.thumb.jpg.057e057473825a7f927e39dbaeafb315.jpg

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8 minutes ago, theterrym said:

Without a doubt the car was built in Oshawa Ontario.

 

Now that is a very cool thing to have found in ANY car.  Thanks for that pic, I'd never known it would be like that.

 

 

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On 2017-05-22 at 4:24 AM, Spinneyhill said:

Are the generator and starter made by McKinnon Industries rather than Anderson? If so what does the name tag look like?

They are Anderson. Sorry forgetting back so late. DSC_9357.thumb.JPG.0bb2486ee6c1c77a700ad153cca9a5bb.JPG

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I have been slowly picking away. Shes almost completely nakedDSC_9497.thumb.JPG.b1049f8f97ba6f3937628e54685abe45.JPGDSC_9498.thumb.JPG.f17eca7e9ee4ed8c78c150de681d4eb9.JPG. Now that its taken down its time to start building it back up. New king pins should arrive in a few days and its almost time to clean and get some paint on that frame.

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