drtidmore

a 170 degree thermostat...SUCCESS!

35 posts in this topic

I switched from the 195 degree thermostat to a 180 degree [on the Red]. For me living in Wisconsin that is as low as I should go. The Black [being my winter driver will keep the 195 as I like having "hot heat".

 But good for you researching this and coming up with an alternative for our southern owners like yourself who have constant high temperatures.

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47 minutes ago, drtidmore said:

SUCCESS!

 

Thanks for the hard work you put into this. I will be getting one soon. That will work great here in Tennessee for me. It's 81* here right now and warming up this weekend to the high 80s.

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That is simply wonderful B) I run both my engines with 180* as I found 160* was just a little too cool, even as a summer only, but this looks like a terrific option if I have knock issues when/if I get too aggressive with boost. Thanks for the update.

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FYI, the way I gradually reduced the diameter after the initial reduction using the stamped lip on the original flange as my reference was to scribe a line using an awl just inside the edge and then grind to that edge.  This way I maintained the integrity of the diameter about the center of the thermostat housing.  I had to do this several times as I was only take a fraction of a mm off each time, but I did not want to remove more than absolutely necessary.

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You could also use an old Machinist's trick- use a magic marker to paint the surface, to easily see what's being removed. I can also imagine- laying the O-ring on top, then marking the excess area. A green or blue metal dye is usually used for "Step turning" on a lathe. It's easily applied in this case with a Q-tip.  https://www.amazon.com/Dykem-80300-Steel-Layout-Brush/dp/B0018ACR6G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1493338317&sr=8-1&keywords=machinist+marking+fluid

 

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Posted (edited)

Just an update.  Yesterday was a work-on-the-Reatta day.  I finally got around to replacing the noisy harmonic balancer (result of backfiring when fuel pump started to fail recently).  I dropped the pan on the tranny for a filter and fluid change (as much as can be done with just a pan drop) as well as to just get a look for anything abnormal (i.e. debris in the pan...none found thank goodness).  I did notice a short, low pressure, reinforced rubber hose located above the filter that was in less than pristine condition and as it was an easy replacement, I took care of that (replaced with high pressure reinforced fuel injection hose stock). Then I put it on the road to verify that the tranny was still a happy camper.  FYI, this tranny has been routinely serviced all its life running Trans-X to keep down varnish and other deposit, so changing fluid does not concern me in least.

 

The ambient temps were running 89-91, the humidity was stifling, the AC was running and I had the car at 70+MPH.  The engine temps climbed into the mid 170s and on mild extended uphill climbs reached 181 at which time the HS fans kicked on and brought it back to the 170-171 range (HS fans ON at 180, off at 170).   On exiting back into city traffic, the engine temp for a brief time climbed to 185, and again, the HS fans had kicked on at 180 so even sitting at idle in city traffic, the engine temp began to drop back down into the mid 170s.  I am a happy camper overall with the way the 170 degree thermostat is working along with the HS fan mod.  

Edited by drtidmore (see edit history)

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5 hours ago, drtidmore said:

I did notice a short, low pressure, reinforced rubber hose located above the filter that was in less than pristine condition and as it was an easy replacement, I took care of that (replaced with high pressure reinforced fuel injection hose stock).

 

You saved your transmission. That is a return sump line to the Charge Pump, from the Forward Accumulators. If it were to leak- you'd have no forward gears, and the pressure loss would smoke the clutch pack. First the gas leak, now this? 

 

That car is trying to kill itself- or you.

 

TRANS_HOSE.thumb.JPG.62581754b492a3dba20d902021a7d0a6.JPG

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Posted (edited)

yes, that is hose.  It was structurally still intact but the ends were fraying and the entire length was deteriorating.  Rubber has a lifespan and being in a hot transmission for almost 30 years took its toll.  I just consider this part of owning a car of this age.  It is a constant effort to check things and assume nothing. 

Edited by drtidmore (see edit history)
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I installed the HyperTech Power Stat #1007 today. At highway speeds It keeps my engine at about 173 on a 90* day like we had today.

 

David, thanks for figuring out what needed to be done make it work in our 3800s.

 

I might post a tutorial on ROJ about what needs to be done to install the 170 degree thermostat, so it will be easy to find, if anyone is interested.

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I had already taken the photos I needed so I decided to go ahead and make a how-to guide that explains how to make the HyperTech 170 degree thermostat work in the Reatta's 3800 engine. It can be found here: Hypertech 170* Thermostat Modification

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