Trulyvintage

Help identifying Stutz car number plate

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OK ...

 

I believe the M8-24 identifies as a 1929 Stutz Roadster ...

 

Anyone know what the next 5 digits mean from Stutz records ?

 

Other than those numbers being a federal vin regigistration ?

 

 

Jim

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It was a 1929 or 1930 car.   134 1/2 inch wheelbase.  The other 5 digits are from the FEDCO system.   If you do a forum search you can find other threads explaining it.  There is no meaning to it other than when the letters are decoded it will match the engine #.     

Edited by K8096 (see edit history)

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Thank You !

 

Did the 5 digit FEDCO system interchange with any Stutz records that might still be available ?

 

This Stutz appears to be a 1929 Roadster base model with a rear bumper - not front fender - continental kit.

 

 

 

Jim

Edited by Trulyvintage (see edit history)

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M8-24 is a Two-passenger Speedster with Rumble Seat (134 1/2 inch wheelbase).

SY32H  translates to 30325.

30325 is a 1929 serial number.

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Will post a pix.  They car IDplate that is posted above by truly vintage is identical to one I took this morning

 

the car is partially apart but easy to see with pix.  It is a roadster  with 8 cylinder.  Not DOHC.  Has a rumble seat.  Doors are cut down

has continental kit with double spare tires. May not get pix until weekend 

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10 hours ago, Ron Pack said:

Will post a pix.  They car IDplate that is posted above by truly vintage is identical to one I took this morning

 

the car is partially apart but easy to see with pix.  It is a roadster  with 8 cylinder.  Not DOHC.  Has a rumble seat.  Doors are cut down

has continental kit with double spare tires. May not get pix until weekend 

 

Flathead or OHC will make a difference.

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I'll have a go:

 

M8-46-CV820:

M8 is a 1929 designation

46 was the code for a standard Cabriolet Coup body which went on the longer 145 inch chassis. This style of car cost $3,995 new.

 

CV820 ... hmm. This isn't quite right. Stutz used the chassis number with a couple of digits coded into letters.

There was no letter 'V', in the replacement code, but there was a 'W' and a 'Y' It can't be a 'W' because 'W' = 6 and less than 6,000 145 inch frame Stutz cars were made in 1929, so it is definitely a 'Y', which = '0'.

 

 The last stamping should also be a letter, not a number, so the '0' is probably a 'D' or a badly stamped 'C'

In all probability 'CV820' is actually 'CY82D' or 'CY82C'. This would give it frame number 40821 or 40824

The first numeral, the '4' was only assigned to 145 inch frames, so that matches with the body type.

 

Interestingly enough, chassis number 40894 - which is a few cars away - still exists. It has a Weymann body. 

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Speedster implies it’s a Roadster. Much more deseriable than a Convertible. A rear mounted spare is NOT a  Continental Kit, it is the standard basic set up the car was sold with. Dual sidemounts or a dual rear spare would be a factory extra. Some like the rear spare, some don’t. Basically whatever makes the car have a better profile would be more deseriable, and the appearance of a longer hood usually makes a rear spare on a 1929 car look better. Doors are probably factory and not cut down, as Stutz used that style  door on both the roadsters and pheaton. Does the car have a folding windshield? Wind wings? They are a fun car and decent drivers. There is currently a new run of high speed gears for the worm drive rear end in production, if you are seriously intrested in the car I would buy a set NOW, as they aren’t making any extras and production should be finished in less than a week.   Don’t let the car slip through your fingers, good open Stutz cars are a rare find in any condition, and almost impossible to find a Roadster today. Post a few photos please. Ed

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i was asked about this one also...thanks for letting me tag on to your thread...1928 model bb but not sure on the rest

 

1928 Stutz ID Tag.jpg

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It is a bit hard to read: BB-C8-A?5??

That is indeed a 1928 car, and a big one at that. It was bodied with a '8C' which was the code for a 7 place sedan or limousine. That body style was built by Robbins and sold for $3,995.00. The finished car weighed in at 5,159 Lb, so it was the heaviest thing Stutz sold that year. Robbins, by the way, pretty much got out of the car body business by the end of '28. They were basically a joinery company, so Robbins re-deployed the workforce's existing skills and went into radio cabinet production.

 

The serial number is a bit hard to read after the 'C8'.

The letter 'A' indicates that the car's chassis number should start with a '7', which is correct for the 1928 long-wheelbase 145 inch chassis that wore this limousine body.

The next letter looks like an up-side-down 'C' but is probably a 'D' which is code for a '1'.

Next up is a '5' 

After that is a ? - It is a round looking number, so either an '8', or '0'. It can't be a '3' because the font used had a '3' with a flat top.

The final stamping is again a letter. It looks like either a 'B' or a 'H', with the latter being the front runner to my eyes. The 'B' indicated '9' while 'H' is code for '5'.

 

This then gives us  four permutations:

ID plate        =      chassis number

BB-C8-AD50H   = 71505

BB-C8-AD58H   = 71585

 

 

OR

 

BB-C8-AD50B   = 71509

BB-C8-AD58B   = 71589

 

The answer should lie behind the rear right bumper, stamped on the chassis. That's where you should find the matching number to one of the above.

 

Please, if you can, post a picture of the car. It would be interesting to see.

 

 

Edited by Smile
Thought a bit more. (see edit history)

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