Doug1414

1950 Buick Special Tranny/U-Joint/Torque Tube Lubrication

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Doug1414    38

This is my first vehicle with a torque tube.  I only know u-joints connected to tranny's.  I drained the tranny and did not measure so I do not know if the fluid from the u-joint/torque tube came out or not.  Someone has said they believe it all comes out when draining the tranny.  I looked in the shop manual and it said to put 7/8 pint in the tranny.  Then it says to inject 1/2 pint through the universal joint yoke.  All I see when I look is a rubber boot which is 3 or 4 inches long that goes between the tranny and the torque tube.  There is no plug to remove to add fluid so I AM LOST!  I believe the rubber can be peeled back but I did not peel it completely back as I do not want to ruin it.  Is the rubber a reservoir for fluid?  If so, can I peel it back and inject the fluid.  Not even sure why they use the word inject.  I have read that if I put ALL the fluid in the tranny that it could cause the bearing to fail as it takes too long for the fluid to reach the bearing from the tranny after driving it a short distance so that is why it is important to inject a 1/2 pint at the u-joint.  BUT!!!  If all the fluid drains out when I drain the tranny, won't the fluid that I inject just run down into the tranny reservoir anyway???  Thanks for listening.  I live in a small town in Oregon and no mechanics here know this information.  I appreciate any information you can share with me.  And I am wondering why I cannot find this information in the shop manual.  Also the rubber boot has slices in it like at one time it rubbed something while turning.  None of the slices are all the way through the rubber but I imagine it is weaker than it should be.  Cannot find this part in manual.  Should it be replaced?  Thanks for your help.  503-422-9598 or peedolomi@hotmail.com.

100_0350[1].JPG

Edited by Doug1414 (see edit history)

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avgwarhawk    1,269

There is no filling the torque ball seal and u-joint inside that I'm aware of.    There are channels fluid gets to this area from the main body of the transmission.  Manual trans? 

 

Inside the torque ball is this configuration.  There is channel that allows fluid in.  This is how it looks on my manual:

 

IMAG0765_zps5d884d35.jpg

 

 

If you do have a manual and do not know how much to fill....I fill mine on level ground.  Pump in the gear oil unit it spills out of the fill plug.  Done. 

 

 

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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avgwarhawk    1,269

To answer the other questions....you won't find this plug in the torque ball in the manual because it does exist.    The rubber boot keeps dirt out.  Maybe cracking from age.   I would leave it as is.  I run mine without the boot.  My torque ball seal does not suffer any adverse affects as a result.  If your torque ball seal is not leaking and it appears it is good leave it alone.  Drain/fill and drive.        

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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Doug1414    38

So when you say drain/fill and drive you mean all of the fluid in the syncromesh tranny?  On page 4-21 of my 1950 Buick Shop Manual, paragraph 9, it says to put 7/8 pint in tranny and 1/2 pint needs to be injected through the universal joint yoke.  BUT that makes no sense because if all the fluid ran out when I drained the tranny then after I inject 1/2 pint into the yoke it would just run down into the tranny all over again or it could not of drain out when I emptied the tranny the first time.  Is this making sense?  

 

Also, the 1950 Shop Manual says to put 1 3/8 pints of fluid in but I have a Motor's Manual which says 1 3/4 pints.  Any suggestions?

 

Thanks for your time and help.

 

Doug

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JohnD1956    2,011

Does the section you are referring to in the manual perhaps reflect lubricating a transmission that has been rebuilt, and is now starting out "dry", meaning with no prior lubrication?  If so, then I think you are overthinking this one.  It appears the issue is pre lubing the rear most bearing.  But if you are just draining the trans and refilling it with fresh gear lube then that's probably not needed.  Especially if you have already spun the transmission and thereby splashed the existing lube into that particular bearing.

 

The bigger question for me is why are you draining the original lube?  That stuff is made from dinosaurs. And unless the transmission was sitting in the mud or something else was happening, like a rebuild for instance, I'd just check the level like Matt said and top it off. 

 

And by injecting the 1/2 pint through the universal yoke, it would mean literally removing the Torque Tube assembly to access the universal.  I would think there is no way the engineers would have intended that for the service techs to do if someone just wanted fresh lube.

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avgwarhawk    1,269
9 hours ago, Doug1414 said:

So when you say drain/fill and drive you mean all of the fluid in the syncromesh tranny?  On page 4-21 of my 1950 Buick Shop Manual, paragraph 9, it says to put 7/8 pint in tranny and 1/2 pint needs to be injected through the universal joint yoke.  BUT that makes no sense because if all the fluid ran out when I drained the tranny then after I inject 1/2 pint into the yoke it would just run down into the tranny all over again or it could not of drain out when I emptied the tranny the first time.  Is this making sense?  

 

Also, the 1950 Shop Manual says to put 1 3/8 pints of fluid in but I have a Motor's Manual which says 1 3/4 pints.  Any suggestions?

 

Thanks for your time and help.

 

Doug

 

Doug,

When I drain I only drop the plug under the syncromesh manual.  Once drained I replace the drain plug.   I fill at the side access plug.  I use a simple plastic hand pump that screws on top of the gear oil container.  I use 90 weight. I pump in the gear oil until it starts to drip out of the fill hole.  At this juncture the syncromesh is full.  I make no measurements of pints etc.  It is not an exact science.  Now, you are probably wonder how I get under the car and fill while it sits level.  Tight fit right?  What I do is jack up the side of the car the fill hole is located.  I fill the synrcomesh until the gear oil starts to drip out of the fill hole.  I then slide a oil catch pain under the syncromesh.  I lower the jack allowing the car to sit level.  The overfill of oil will drain into my pan.  Once that stops I jack up the car again and replace the plug.  Job done.        I do nothing at the torque ball or drain anything from there.  Unless that area is leaking very badly leave it as is.   The gear oil will find it's way to the torque ball and yoke via the engineered rifling found in the brass bushing.  The channel allows this oil to run back into the sump of the syncromesh.   It is a clever design.            

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Doug1414    38

Thanks to all who answered.  I now can continue.  I am sad though about draining dinosaur liquid but I just did not know.  All the cars I have ever restored have been a 1961 Cadillac, a 1963 Pontiac Gran Prix, a 1966 Ford 4 W D,  4 door pickup, a 1967 International Scout plus a few more.  Never have stuck to one car manufacturer.  But my dream car has always been an older Buick with the Big Teeth Grill like the one on the Rain Man Movie.  They have elevated so much in price I had given up until I found this 1950 Buick built in Summer of 1949 when I was born at a fair price with no rust and I could not say no.  The first thing I always did with other cars was change the rear end and tranny and crankcase fluids plus check the brakes before I even started it.  The fluid that came out of the rear end was actually reddish maroon and extremely thick.  I had never seen that but drained it into a tub that contaminated it.  I figured then it was a mistake.  And I had already done the tranny but I believe it must of been changed before as it seemed to look like present day 90 WT.  I actually do the work to check for metal particles in case I need to rebuild.  

 

Anyway, thanks to all who helped.  I will post a picture as soon as it gets painted.  Am interested in door cards if someone has a set or a sun visor or I will just make the cards myself "IN MY SPARE TIME!!!"  LOL!!

 

Doug

peedolomi@hotmail.com

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avgwarhawk    1,269

I changed the fluid in the rear of my 54.  It was leaking and the cover had to come off for a new gasket anyway.  The primeval goo and stench that slowly drained into the pan was something from a horror movie.  I'm still clearing my sinus of the stench. :wacko:   Anyway, no harm done.  For me it was a piece of mind.   New gear oil added.  Off to the races.    

 

Ebay is your friend for parts like visors, etc.   Good luck with your new Buick!  

 

 

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leon bee    68

I don't know if MOST of us would have routinely changed all those fluids, but I and many others would.

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Doug1414    38

I cannot believe what a great place I have found in this forum.  It makes me so happy that I decided to build another car.  I am having so much fun reading everyone's blurbs and comments.  It's like the old days when a bunch of us would gather in one of our garages and just chew on everything.  The best of times are here again.  Thanks guys.  Your knowledge and support is much appreciated.  

 

Doug

peedolomi@hotmail.com

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avgwarhawk    1,269

The forum support is excellent.  Aftermarket parts as well as original part support for our Buicks is very good.  Club support is top notch. One of the many  reasons I decided on a Buick for my first classic car.  A decision I never regretted.  In fact, purchased my second Buick 4 weeks ago. We are a different breed here in the Buick Universe. 

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Doug1414    38

I am wondering!!  Is a 1950 Buick some kind of a transitional car?  I have always been in love with the teethy grill and now I have my hands on one.  YEA!!!  BUT it seems like parts up until 1949 and 1951 and later are more plentiful.  Maybe I just haven't learned all the ins and outs of finding parts yet.  Thanks again for all your help.  Also, now that you mentioned it, I am starting to look for another Buick to soothe my soul.  

 

Doug

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Bill Stoneberg    351

1950 was very much a 1 year only car in more ways then one.  Look at the car, like you said, teethy grill, ports in the hood, some of them had to use a special tool to open the hood, first year of the 263 with hydraulic lifters, last year of the 248 in the special are just a few of the items I can think of.

Which 1950 do you have ?

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Doug1414    38

I am still not sure which Buick I have.  But I know I love it.  The plate says the Style # is 4469 D.   I know the D is for deluxe.  And I have tons of chrome (which shined up very nicely) and lots of trim on the side and around the car and around all the windows.  I got the car with it all removed.  The mechanic was in the middle of a restore and he died.  The original owner was over 90 so he let me have it at a fair price after the drive train was all redone and the primer paint was already applied.  Lots of interior work still needs help.  He still had the original bill of sale from the Buick Dealer, which I framed.  I still have the title with the original owners name which matches the bill of sale.  It is a California title which explains why there is absolutely no rust on the body.  Yes there are a couple of small spots on the floor which he repaired but not as professional as I would like so I that is a project for later.  Front seat reupholstered and I have the same material for the back seat.  Needs a headliner.  I have the material and the bows but have no idea how to even start a project like that.  I am going to make new door cards as I have the old ones to use as patterns.  Chrome inside nice but not perfect like outside.  

 

The Body # is BC 8087.  Trim #43 and Paint #14.  The VIN is 60852674.  

 

I will appreciate any info you can give me about my car.  The VIN plate was removed and I did not find it among the many, many boxes of parts.  Must of scavenged another Buick as I have 2 of lots of things.  But the VIN on the motor matches the title so I am happy. I read where there is another VIN stamped on the frame rail near the brake master cylinder but I did not find it.  Something about an extended frame.  

 

I also wonder if the removed plate I have that was originally on the firewall which states the Style # and Body # and Trim # And Paint # could of possibly been from the scavenged car.  Is there a way I can find out?  It is a blessing that the VIN on the motor matches the original family title.

 

Thanks for listening.  What a great forum I have found.  

 

Doug 

503-422-9598

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Bill Stoneberg    351

Your exterior is Geneva Green and the interior is a Grey striped cloth.

You should have a number plate mounted to the drivers door jam.

 

Back then most of the DMVs used the motor number as the VIN.  Being a Special  you have a 248 Cu / In motor.

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Doug1414    38

Unfortunately the driver door jam VIN plate is missing but the same number is on the motor.  I am hoping to find the one down by the master cylinder eventually.  I need to find the page where I read its location exactly and then start a new topic and maybe someone will know.  Thanks for answering.

 

Doug

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Doug, the # you are calling the VIN is the engine #. As Bill pointed out most states used that as the Serial # back then.  If the door jamb # was there, it and the frame #  should be the same. SOME states used that #. 

 Near the master cylinder is where the Shop Manual indicates the frame # should be. I have been unable to locate mine.

  By the way, the Engine # you have does prove the engine was originally installed in a series 40 "Special", as indicated with the final digit 4. So one can infer it is the original 248 for your car.

 

  Ben

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