midman

Babbitt Engine Rebuilder in Pennsylvania Area

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midman    46

Hey Everyone,

 

Are there any recommendations for a decent Babbitt engine rebuilder in Pennsylvania. I ran my 31 Buick hot and wiped the bearings :-( at a minimum.

I dropped the pan and pulled a cap and sure enough.

I know there are a couple of places in New England and the Mid West but I'd like to be within reasonable driving distance if at all possible. I am in South Central Pennsylvania.

 

Any leads would be appreciated.

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29 franklin    12

There is a company in Cazenovia NY called Reeve enterprises . They rebuild any engine and do all their own babbitt work. They rebuilt my Franklin engine.Nice people to deal with. 315 655 8812   

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Owen_Dyneto    18

Automotive Restorations, Rte 22 West, Lebanon, New Jersey does all manner of vintage and classic engines.   908-236-6400, ask for Steve Babinsky.

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Although not in Pennsylvania, Hart's in not too far away in Cecil, Ohio and does a great job. Their prices are very competitive and their turn around time is relatively fast. They are a good, professional shop with a great reputation:

 

http://www.hartsmachineservice.com/home.html

 

Another possibility is Schalwms in Pennsylvania. I know they specialize in Model T/A Fords, but they might also do other engines. Again, a great shop with a great reputation. If they can not help you, they might be able to refer you to someone in PA.

 

http://www.schwalms.com/

Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)

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midman    46

I talked to most of the recommended shops. I decided to go with Reeve Enterprises in NY. They are 4 hours away but they seemed very knowledgeable and were OK with just doing the babbit and head work. They also walked me through pressure testing my block to check for any cracks.

 

I'll post how it all goes.

thanks for the help.

Chuck

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PFitz    38
On ‎4‎/‎23‎/‎2017 at 5:59 PM, 29 franklin said:

Glad you went with Patrick and his Dad . You will not be disappointed. 

 

 

I'll second that. I've used Reeve's shop for 20 years. Patrick and Mike have decades of experience and all the equipment to completely rebuild any engine - gas or diesel, antique or new, street, race, stationary, or marine. Everything but aircraft.

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SaddleRider    16

FAILED BABBIT CONNECTING ROD BEARINGS:

 

First question - bad news - when rod bearings fail, they usually damage the crankshaft.  Have you resolved the condition of your crankshaft journals?

 

I recommend using a "poured babbit" style connecting rod bearing if you have access to a time machine, to insure your long-stroke engine will be limited to driving with the engine speeds consistent with the roads of the era when your car was in service.

 

For an interesting article on what happens to cars equipped with poured babbit bearings when driven on later roads in later driving conditions,  I recommend researching what happened when the first stretches of the PENNSYLVANIA TURNPIKE opened in the late 1930's.  Hint - tow trucks got a lot of business those first few days...!

 

Let me qualify the above - perhaps your car is a "show-car".  In that event,  it need only run far enough from its trailer to where it will be parked for viewing, and, perhaps, in the case of the PEBBLE BEACH event, a few miles of driving on two-lane curved roads at very modest speeds.    "Poured babbit" rod bearings would be appropriate if you can limit your use for that purpose.

 

Should you want to actually drive your pre-World War II "long stroke" style motor on modern roads,  even at speeds modest by today's standards......   I recommend  "insert type" connecting rod bearings  (that came into common use in the mid 1930's. )

 

When I was a kid in the early 1950's....we used to go 'hunting" in wrecking yards for then current era wrecked Buicks (to get their connecting rods)   ,  (Buick was one of the last hold-outs - I believe 1952 was their first year for "inserts"  - so 'insert" style connecting rods were popular for those of us with older Buicks who wanted to go fast, and not have to hitch-hike home..;.....!)

 

 

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midman    46

Update on my engine rebuild:

 

Reeves found a small crack in the block. He said it did not show up under pressure until he hit 70 psi. He said it would "probably" be OK. I told him to have it repaired. $$$

 

As suggested earlier he is going to machine the rods for insert bearings. The crank is OK, cam is OK.

 

Getting the cam bearings redone.

 

Need oversized pistons. I've been looking for more than a 2 months, nothing so I have to get them made. $$$$$

 

Head is good so just getting redone and new seats installed.

 

When Reeves is done I am going to do the final assembly.

 

I'll post the assembly as I go.

 

 

 

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C Carl    285

As long as you're up , talk to Arias or Ross and see if you can get your compression ratio up to 7.00 : 1 , or even 7.50 : 1. Since you MUST go the new piston & ring route , balance and blueprint , cc it , and you will enjoy it so much that you will rationalize the entire event to have been a blessing ! And thank you for the update. Along with the other guys and gals , and as a driver of ancient iron , I have been interested to see how you are getting on. Very best of luck with your rebuild !   - Carl

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edinmass    241

Aries and Ross are not that expensive, you get Pistons, ri Gus, and pins all for about 125 per piston. If a very fair price.

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PFitz    38

Reeves orders Ross pistons for me. Both the Aries and the Ross are very strong and well made, but the Aries are much more expensive.

 

Paul

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C Carl    285

You guys with much more experience than I have in these matters : what would be an ideal and feasible compression ratio ? In order to match the engine to run far better and more efficiently on modern 87 octane , could the piston tops be contoured to go to 8 or 8.5 ? This is why I suggested consulting with the manufacturers , who have vast engineering knowledge. Talking to the Stutz Tech Advisor at Hershey in 2013 , he said they bring Stutz up to 7 or 7.5. In the case of this '31 Bu' , with new high quality pistons and insert bearings , a significant boost in compression seems to be an opportunity not to be wasted. Naturally , cam profile is a huge factor , as compression pressure is not the same as compression ratio. This will still be a relatively slow turning engine , and would not have the duration and overlap , nor scavenging & volumetric efficiency characteristics of a modern high revving mill. I wish I could get my old Cadillacs up from 4.5 and 4.7.   - Carl

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cahartley    205
On 8/5/2017 at 9:35 AM, midman said:

 

Reeves found a small crack in the block. He said it did not show up under pressure until he hit 70 psi. He said it would "probably" be OK. I told him to have it repaired. $$$

Need oversized pistons. I've been looking for more than a 2 months, nothing so I have to get them made. $$$$$

 

Where is the crack?

Nobody suggested sleeving and standard pistons rather than spending a fortune for custom pistons?

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midman    46

The cylinders need to be bored, and I cannot find any pistons for this motor, standard or otherwise. If we could have found some standards than sleeving probably might have been the choice. So pistons need to be made anyway.

 

I hadn't thought about upping the compression ratio. I'll talk to them about it on Monday if it is not too late.

 

I am getting it balanced.

 

Thanks for the feedback.

 

Chuck

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C Carl    285

Chuck , the first thing you will need to know is the combustion chamber volume , cc's. I do hope it is not too late to take advantage of an opportunity you are paying for anyway. Who are you having make the new pistons ?  I called Arias , and spoke with Steve Montrelli , who has been with Arias for going on 40 years now. He is one of the great old school guys , even older than I am. He is at extension 44 , 310-532-9737 for the record , and benefit of anyone needing the service of this esteemed company. See if you can take a little extra time in order to make the most of your situation. Flat top ? Dome ? Dish ? Dimples ? Hey ! You are getting FORGED Pistons ! Break out the clay !   - Carl 

 

P.S. : Also for the record , perhaps an overbearing spellcheck is trying to turn the name of Arias into some sign of the Zodiac. And I don't think it is Leo , or Capricorn. No it is not a goat. Ram , niether.  - CC

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