midman

Babbitt Engine Rebuilder in Pennsylvania Area

10 posts in this topic

Hey Everyone,

 

Are there any recommendations for a decent Babbitt engine rebuilder in Pennsylvania. I ran my 31 Buick hot and wiped the bearings :-( at a minimum.

I dropped the pan and pulled a cap and sure enough.

I know there are a couple of places in New England and the Mid West but I'd like to be within reasonable driving distance if at all possible. I am in South Central Pennsylvania.

 

Any leads would be appreciated.

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There is a company in Cazenovia NY called Reeve enterprises . They rebuild any engine and do all their own babbitt work. They rebuilt my Franklin engine.Nice people to deal with. 315 655 8812   

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Automotive Restorations, Rte 22 West, Lebanon, New Jersey does all manner of vintage and classic engines.   908-236-6400, ask for Steve Babinsky.

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Posted (edited)

Although not in Pennsylvania, Hart's in not too far away in Cecil, Ohio and does a great job. Their prices are very competitive and their turn around time is relatively fast. They are a good, professional shop with a great reputation:

 

http://www.hartsmachineservice.com/home.html

 

Another possibility is Schalwms in Pennsylvania. I know they specialize in Model T/A Fords, but they might also do other engines. Again, a great shop with a great reputation. If they can not help you, they might be able to refer you to someone in PA.

 

http://www.schwalms.com/

Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)

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I talked to most of the recommended shops. I decided to go with Reeve Enterprises in NY. They are 4 hours away but they seemed very knowledgeable and were OK with just doing the babbit and head work. They also walked me through pressure testing my block to check for any cracks.

 

I'll post how it all goes.

thanks for the help.

Chuck

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Glad you went with Patrick and his Dad . You will not be disappointed. 

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On ‎4‎/‎23‎/‎2017 at 5:59 PM, 29 franklin said:

Glad you went with Patrick and his Dad . You will not be disappointed. 

 

 

I'll second that. I've used Reeve's shop for 20 years. Patrick and Mike have decades of experience and all the equipment to completely rebuild any engine - gas or diesel, antique or new, street, race, stationary, or marine. Everything but aircraft.

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FAILED BABBIT CONNECTING ROD BEARINGS:

 

First question - bad news - when rod bearings fail, they usually damage the crankshaft.  Have you resolved the condition of your crankshaft journals?

 

I recommend using a "poured babbit" style connecting rod bearing if you have access to a time machine, to insure your long-stroke engine will be limited to driving with the engine speeds consistent with the roads of the era when your car was in service.

 

For an interesting article on what happens to cars equipped with poured babbit bearings when driven on later roads in later driving conditions,  I recommend researching what happened when the first stretches of the PENNSYLVANIA TURNPIKE opened in the late 1930's.  Hint - tow trucks got a lot of business those first few days...!

 

Let me qualify the above - perhaps your car is a "show-car".  In that event,  it need only run far enough from its trailer to where it will be parked for viewing, and, perhaps, in the case of the PEBBLE BEACH event, a few miles of driving on two-lane curved roads at very modest speeds.    "Poured babbit" rod bearings would be appropriate if you can limit your use for that purpose.

 

Should you want to actually drive your pre-World War II "long stroke" style motor on modern roads,  even at speeds modest by today's standards......   I recommend  "insert type" connecting rod bearings  (that came into common use in the mid 1930's. )

 

When I was a kid in the early 1950's....we used to go 'hunting" in wrecking yards for then current era wrecked Buicks (to get their connecting rods)   ,  (Buick was one of the last hold-outs - I believe 1952 was their first year for "inserts"  - so 'insert" style connecting rods were popular for those of us with older Buicks who wanted to go fast, and not have to hitch-hike home..;.....!)

 

 

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