Bud Tierney

HELP! Book On (Including?) Early V8s (1900s -20s)

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Bought a copy of Standard Catalog V8s 1906-2002---next to useless for early V8s (should've been titled "Std Cat Mainline V8s".. Does have 8 (count 'em, 8) pgs out of 287 covering "minor makes", naming 29 makes, and I've already got more than twice  that number on my list, altho some never got into production and spme are still questionable......

Just ran across a V8 spoken of as if in existence by Continental Engine Co of  the Fisher Bldg, later of Kingsbury and Huron streets in Chicago circa 1908 (this is the "imitation " Continental, NOT the world famous Autocar/Continental later of Muskegon etc) but I have no info it actually produced...

Does anyone know if  there's another book covering early V8s,(1900s to 20s or so) especially in orphan cars, or a general engine history book that's good on produced or even proposed early V8s???Any comments appreciated. many thxx   Bud T

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You are right there were a lot of V8s in the early days. Everyone knows Cadillac in 1915 but there were more than 20 makes of V8 between 1915 and 1923, most of them introduced in 1915. First production V8 the French DeDion Bouton in 1910. The 1908 Continental would be first if it exists. Of course there were others, but not in production cars. Frank Curtis built a V8 in 1907 and tested it in a motorcycle at Daytona Beach!

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Posted (edited)

Kevin Casey published a well researched article in Beaded Wheels, the magazine of the New Zealand Vintage Car Club, on this topic a year or so ago. I'll look it out later, unless nzcarnerd can find it first!

 

OK, first part in issue 323, Aug-Sept 2013, "V8s before Henry". "At least 65 marques that used V8 power." The article is copyright so you will have to contact Kevin and the VCC, or buy the back issues. www.vcc.org.nz

 

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)

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Rolls-Royce got into the V-8 game in 1905. 1 sold, 3 made.

 

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The Legalimit, they built the first V8 and governed it to 20MPH. Why? I guess they figured out it wasn't such a hot idea after they built 3 of them lol.

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Hopefully this is not out of the book you have.

 

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Wow that is 10 motors, some may have been used by more than 1 maker. I knew there were a lot more V8s in 1915 than just Cadillac, although you wouldn't know it from GM's publicity.

 

I would love to read that book about the first V8s, and how they came to be developed, and why so many different makers had the same idea at the same time.

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Marmon had a prototype v8 that was scheduled to be produced in 1908 but never made it past the prototype stage.  I don' know if they ever made it to a car but the Curtis OX-5  aero engines were produced quite early.

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2 hours ago, nickelroadster said:

  I don' know if they ever made it to a car but the Curtis OX-5  aero engines were produced quite early.

 

Curtis OX-5 aero engines seem to have been quite popular in race cars of the period. Still sought after for Speedster and vintage racer builds today.

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OX-5 engines are a nightmare to rebuild.  I have a friend who has rebuilt a few of them, and is working on more on a daily basis.  Lots of parts, hundreds, each one critical to the life of the engine.  The man he works for has a dozen or more sitting in storage.

 

I would say I'd rather be behind the wheel of an OX-5 powered car than up in the air in an OX-5 powered Jenny.  At least you can pull off to the side of the road in the car if/when the engine fails...

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14 hours ago, trimacar said:

OX-5 engines are a nightmare to rebuild.  I have a friend who has rebuilt a few of them, and is working on more on a daily basis.  Lots of parts, hundreds, each one critical to the life of the engine. 

 

Yeah but they sure sound good with open exhaust stacks :)

 

Me... I'm holding out hope to someday I'll be able to snag a Liberty V-12....

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Got to work on a 1915 or there about Oldsmobile a bunch of years ago. Got it wired up. cleaned carb, Ect. Hit the starter switch and it purred like a Chevy 350 idling. Dandy Dave!  

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Is that some kind of gasoline pre-heat device on top of the engine?  I see a line to head and water line, and a gas line (??) to the vacuum tank?

 

I've always liked the early Olds V-8, and you rarely see one....

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Yes. Water lines from the engine coolant help to warm the fuel in that style of heat riser. Dandy Dave! 

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Worked on a 1922 Peerless also years back. Same basic V8 that was introduced in 1916 and I believe it was supplied by Herschell-Spillman. Dandy Dave!

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I once had a '16 Briscoe with an ohv Ferro V-8.  Pretty good engine, under-engineered car, fast little stinker when it wasn't snapping axles.

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The unit over the engine with lines going in is the intake manifold with an updraft carburetor.  The car shown is at least a 1917 because of the Horseshoe shaped radiator.  1915s and 1916s had a more angular shaped radiator.  I have a 1916model 44, a1917 model44b and a 1923 model 47.  The 15 and sixteen have a v8 like Dandy Dave's photo and the 23 has a completely different design V8.  An interesting fact is Oldsmobile had just invested five million dollars in V8 machine tools in 1921 and then Alfred P. Sloan told them they couldn't make V8s after 1923.  Oldsmobile then sold their brand new machine tools to Wiils-Saint Claire for twenty cents on the dollar.  Wills basically copied the Aero V8 made by Hispano Suiza.  The Hisso engine was a very good and light engine that you will find in a lot of Jennys that are still flying as the OX-5 was and is a POS

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Many thanks to all for leads and comments...

No luck so far on whether the Cont'l Eng Co V8 actually existed---they also advertised and had written up marine engines, so I'll try Richard Durgee over at oldmarineengine.com (if it existed he'll have something on it!!)

It's always been my impression multi-cylinder development in marine engines was considerably ahead of in auto/truck engines...

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