WHSEWARD

1931 Lincoln 2-window Berline

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Here is a historic and award-winning 1931 Lincoln Model K. It is equipped with a 120 hp flathead V8, and has a 145" wheelbase. Its body, Number 5-12271, custom built by the J.B. Judkins Company of Merrimac, MA, is one of 124 two-window Berlines produced by Judkins for Lincoln for the 1931 model year; only four of these cars are believed to still exist. The car was delivered new to Richmond, California on October 30, 1931 and passed through a succession of California owners before I purchased it in 2013. Provenance is available on request.

The engine, carburetor and water pump were rebuilt in the late 80's. The original mechanical fuel pump has been replaced with an electric pump; the original pump will go with the car. A high-speed (3.77:1) rear end was installed in 2006/7 to replace the stock 4.58:1 gear. In 2013 the exterior was completely stripped to bare metal, resurfaced and repainted in factory-correct Forest Green (IM-584) over black fenders, using single-stage urethane. The split and deteriorated leather roof was replaced with a new vinyl formal roof. The front seat was re-upholstered using wool broadcloth selected to match the remainder of the original interior. However, apart from this and the lower wood trim in the front compartment, the rest of the interior is essentially original, as shown in the photographs. Dash panel instruments are functional except for the clock and the fuel indicator.

The car starts up every time in all temperatures, runs, shifts and drives smoothly. The manual floor shifter is mated to a semi-synchronized three-speed transmission also equipped for free-wheeling. The original configuration was modified by a previous owner so that in effect there are five forward speeds, although I only use three while driving. It is quite easy to drive after a bit of practice. The huge mechanical brakes stop the car from speed surprisingly quickly. The high-speed rear end permits highway cruising in the 50-60 mph range, and I have taken the car on several trips of 80-100 miles (each way) without any overheating or vapor locking at all, using only regular gasoline. This car is also at home on the show field. Since being acquired in 2013 this car, which is recognized as a "Full Classic" by the Classic Car Club of America. has appeared in four Concours d'Elegance events, securing awards at three of them (Keels & Wheels Concours d'Elegance, Silver Award, 2014 and 2015; Concours d'Elegance of Texas, 2015, Class Winner).

The car is regularly maintained and driven on the highway once a week; it was driven to and from all of the Concours events in which it participated, and in several AACA Tours (2015 AACA Texas Tour) and Meets (2016 Central Fall Meet, Galveston) as well. Two new 700-19 tires and tubes were recently purchased and installed on the front wheels. The engine valves have been adjusted and a recent cylinder compression test performed; all cylinders tested 75 psi or higher with a hot engine. In addition the front wheel bearings were removed and repacked in 2016, the front wheels re-aligned, and the front steering checked and adjusted. This beautiful and elegant Full Classic automobile is ready to continue its life as a combination tour and show car, or to move up in class to the most prestigious Concours events.

The car is located in Katy, Texas and is offered on an as-is, where-is basis. Odometer mileage is believed reasonable but not guaranteed due to age. Many additional photos are available upon request.  Third-party inspections by appointment are welcomed, and reasonable offers will be considered.

Price: $85,000 negotiable 

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I think the site is having trouble with attached jpeg images.  Hopefully they will figure it out, since I've posted about 2000k of them over the last 15 years.

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On 2/26/2017 at 10:44 AM, JACK M said:

I hope its not just me, but I cant look at photos on this site yet.

 

On 2/26/2017 at 11:43 AM, Rich Janouskovec said:

not just you

 

On 2/26/2017 at 3:16 PM, WHSEWARD said:

That is weird - the photos showed up fine when I uploaded them - now they don't.  For additional photos see https://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/cars-for-sale/lincoln/k/1919976.html.  Not a plug, just a hotfix.  Any additional info, just ask.

 

On 2/26/2017 at 3:21 PM, alsancle said:

I think the site is having trouble with attached jpeg images.  Hopefully they will figure it out, since I've posted about 2000k of them over the last 15 years.

 

On 2/26/2017 at 4:09 PM, GARY F said:

cant see anything

 

On 2/26/2017 at 5:13 PM, Rich Janouskovec said:

can't get these picturesa\

 

10 hours ago, JACK M said:

Pics are working now.

Thank You !!!

Thanks to Peter !!

Wow what a nice Lincoln !!

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I suppose it's just the passage of time, but I sure am seeing changes in terminology that I can't quite understand. I've simply never heard of a "two window" anything until now. I hate to be an old crank, but I would have always referred to a body like this one as blind-back sedan, a close coupled sedan or a club sedan. Are these older terms no longer acceptable?

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I have used the term "closed rear quarter" also.   Since it is a Berline, I would not call it a club sedan or close coupled.  If you look at the period advertising, it is in fact a "two window" Berline.

 

JudkinsTwoWindowBerline.jpg.ce779cc73f392c74cc242b64e00476f2.jpg

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My guess is that there is a diplomatic resolution. The "Two Window" refers only to the split windshield ?  Absolutely SPECTACULAR Lincoln. With the enormous amount of recent maintainance, and cruise friendly gearing upgrades , this must be one of the finest tour cars of the period. Not the least of this great car's attributes is the exquisite, almost totally original interior. If I were in the back seat , breathing in that delicious old car aroma , you'd probably have to reef me outta there with a come along , me kicking and screaming  all the while. Did I mention,  closed car aficionado that I am , I LOVE this beautiful old Lincoln ?  - Carl

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Guest BillP

Truly a beautiful car, and very attractive colors, as well.

 

I, too, stopped short at the "two window" description and thought about it while I looked at the pictures and read the ad. I see it has a division window and wonder if that's why they called it that.

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Although SAE tried to impose standardization of body style terms ca. 1929, they were unsuccessful, as manufacturers continued to use terms as they pleased.  Generally, I consider a club sedan to be a relatively close-coupled four-door sedan with blind rear quarters; add a division glass and you have a berline.  In 1938-40, Cadillac called the "club sedan" (above definition) a Town Sedan, and with a division, leather top, and small rear window, a Formal Sedan.

 

The "two-window" designation refers to the door glasses on one side; since there is no rear quarter window, either a club sedan or a berline can be considered a "two window."  However, the "two window" term seems to be used by aficionados of a few specific makes, most notably Lincoln. 

 

"A rose by any other name.."

 

The subject car is just magnificent.  Many years ago I was allowed to put quite a few miles on an original (except for one quality repaint) 1931 Lincoln K "3-window" 5-passenger sedan, and it was a delight to drive.

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1 hour ago, BillP said:

 I see it has a division window and wonder if that's why they called it that.

 

The Berline part of the name refers to the divider glass.

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Well, I've learned something today. I had to see with my own eyes that the factory advertising referred to this as a "two window" sedan. I'm reminded of a discussion last year in which I complained about the inappropriate, or at least excessive and inaccurate use of the word "coupe" by sellers in their descriptions of their cars. That was laughably futile as the manufacturers themselves nowadays are even calling four door sedans coupes. I guess that the lesson to be learned is that is useless to try to codify terms now when they were fluid at the time the cars were new.

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Hey , fellow "Nightowl" , I sure agree with everything you have just said. Yeah , it sure is easy to learn something new every day here ! Now , I was tempted to chime in on fluidity of meaning. Oh , I was going to say something about the head scratching befuddlement regarding the broadening meaning of "Classic" and "Antique". Having been mesmerized by antique and classic cars since I was a little kid in the late '40s , I was going to say something about '57 Chevvys, and '70 Cadillacs , or post war anythings. And then I thought better of it. Being a proud member of a number of old car organizations including AACA , and CCCA , I thoroughly agree with their functional evolution towards broader inclusion. Exhibiting tactful restraint, I think I will hit the sack. Good night all you 'owls !  - Carl   Hmmm.............. I just realized you could be on Eastern time , in which case you'd be an early bird , or perhaps a rooster crowing for day.

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35 minutes ago, C Carl said:

Hey , fellow "Nightowl" , I sure agree with everything you have just said. Yeah , it sure is easy to learn something new every day here ! Now , I was tempted to chime in on fluidity of meaning. Oh , I was going to say something about the head scratching befuddlement regarding the broadening meaning of "Classic" and "Antique". Having been mesmerized by antique and classic cars since I was a little kid in the late '40s , I was going to say something about '57 Chevvys, and '70 Cadillacs , or post war anythings. And then I thought better of it. Being a proud member of a number of old car organizations including AACA , and CCCA , I thoroughly agree with their functional evolution towards broader inclusion. Exhibiting tactful restraint, I think I will hit the sack. Good night all you 'owls !  - Carl   Hmmm.............. I just realized you could be on Eastern time , in which case you'd be an early bird , or perhaps a rooster crowing for day.

You're right about the "night owl" designation. It's nice to hear from a kindred spirit in the wee small hours.

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My understanding of the term "Berline" is that it refers to a coach (I believe all of these terms come from French coachbuilder terminology, like limousine, Berline, cabriolet, landaulet, even sedan and coupe, etc.) with a four-door passenger compartment, divided by a glass window, with in addition a cloth (not leather) front seat to permit the owner as well as a chauffeur to drive the car.  In addition, the top, instead of being metal with a leather panel insert, is completely covered in leather (or in my case, vinyl); this latter feature, together with the split front window, distinguishes its exterior from the two-window Town Sedan.  The two-window Berline has two windows along the side and a closed rear quarter, while the 3-window Berline has a window panel in the rear quarter.  Judkins therefore made only one Berline body and either covered the window panel with leather for the two-window Berline or put in the glass and surrounds for the 3-window option, as the customer ordered.

 

The CCCA Archives have drawings and/or photos of all the Judkins bodies for 1931 free to view at http:// http://cccamuseum.org/Explore/Archives/ArchiveViewer/tabid/116/Default.aspx

 

Hey, alsancle...I wonder where that 2W in your old photo is now?  That would make #5 that I have found to date.  So far as I know it has not shown up at auction or for sale in the past 15 years or thereabouts.  Can't believe they would have parted it out, so it's gotta be somewhere.

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