Peter Gariepy

Sucker for an orphan - Powell Crosley - what can tell me about it?

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Available locally.  What can you all tell me about a Powell Crosley?

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Supposedly made with leftover Plymouth parts. Does it still have the trough, pullout tube shelves in the rear?

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Gonna look at it tommorrow and will let you know

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It's a Powell. Has nothing to do with Crosley. My next door neighbor has three or four of them

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Posted (edited)

Yep. Nothing to do with Crosley. Powell Sport Wagon Company, Compton, California. Chassis were primarily 1941 Plymouth. Introduced 1954. Available in two styles....pickup and station wagon.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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Powel Crosley was the inventor who designed and built affordable radios, refrigerators etc. and yes, Crosley automobiles.  If you're interested, here's a link to a Wikipedia article on Powel (notice only one 'L') Crosley:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powel_Crosley,_Jr

 

I've never heard of a Powell vehicle.  Peter, it looks like you have a pick up truck.  Did they make cars as well?  Anyway, the front end looks like a cross between an early International Scout and Land Rover ... or sumthin'.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, keiser31 said:

Supposedly made with leftover Plymouth parts. Does it still have the trough, pullout tube shelves in the rear?

 

 

Like this?  Seen @ Ypsilanti Orphan Car Show in 2008. 

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Edited by CarFreak (see edit history)

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A few more photos.

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Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, capngrog said:

Powel Crosley was the inventor who designed and built affordable radios, refrigerators etc. and yes, Crosley automobiles.  If you're interested, here's a link to a Wikipedia article on Powel (notice only one 'L') Crosley:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powel_Crosley,_Jr

 

I've never heard of a Powell vehicle.  Peter, it looks like you have a pick up truck.  Did they make cars as well?  Anyway, the front end looks like a cross between an early International Scout and Land Rover ... or sumthin'.

 

Cheers,

Grog

Did you post the wrong link? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powell_Manufacturing_Company

 

PMC was also an early innovator in pickup and SUV design with several models produced in the 1950s using modified Plymouth chassis. The pickup was sold as the Sport Wagon and the SUV as the Station Wagon. Powell's designs were later echoed in the Ford Ranchero and Chevrolet El Camino models which appeared a few years later. Motor Life magazine, in its October 1955 issue (with a photo of the Powell Sport Wagon on the cover), called it "an obvious choice as one of the most interesting and unique automobiles in the U.S." In the February 1956 issue of Motor Trend, magazine co-founder[9] Walt Woron concluded his article: "The Powell Brothers, then, have succeeded in their purpose: to provide a vehicle that '... can't be beat for general utility...[that makes] the perfect runabout or 2nd family car..

 

The Powell manufacturing facility in Compton, California, 

 

efos9ufvprul2ymqwqrv.jpghttp://oppositelock.kinja.com/born-in-compton-powell-sport-wagon-1551165251

 

http://www.allpar.com/old/powell.html

 

Powell Registry - http://www.usscootermuseum.com/powell_01.htm

 

http://clubs.hemmings.com/powellregistry/features.html

 

Sportwagon is the name given to all Powell pickup trucks and station wagons; all were manufactured as 1955 through 1957 model-year vehicles. Our best estimate is that 1,020 pickups and 150 (revised January 2012) station wagons were manufactured over about a two-year period. 

All were built at the Powell factory in Compton, California, and sold through dealers who sold other independent brands or were used car dealers. We are fortunate to have copies of the sales records from a still-existent dealer in Portland, Oregon, and copies of original sales brochures. One contact reported personally seeing several Sportwagons brought to the former African Nation of Rhodesia by an American construction firm. 

The most unique feature of the Powell Sportwagon is that they were built using recycled major running gear components and sold as new cars. All except the original prototype Sportwagon were built on 1941 Plymouth chassis, most purchased from southern California wrecking yards. 

Junk cars were stripped of their bodies and the major components rebuilt as needed. Engines and transmissions from a wide range of Dodge, Plymouth and Chrysler industrial and marine vehicles were also purchased and used in the Sportwagon. The Plymouth instrument cluster, steering column and hubcaps are the only normally visible traces of their heritage. 

The body was constructed piece-by-piece, welded directly to the Plymouth frame. Pictures of the build process can be found on our Factory page. These original photographs were generously donated to the Registry by Motor Trend Magazine several years ago. 

The Sportwagon did not undergo model changes; however, many running changes were made throughout production. The basic body remained unchanged as did the sliding-door windows, and the trademark fishing rod carrier built into the rear fender(s). The very early vehicles, such as our second-oldest listed pickup, PMC-1508, had unique rear bed components, an oak tailgate, and oak bumpers. Early 1955 pickup doors opened all the way back against the front fender. Through mid 1956 all pickups had the rear bed panel and tailgate fashioned from diamond plate. Henry-J steering wheels replaced the Plymouth units in mid 1956. Station wagons were produced in late 1956. Closest to a model change is the additional trim and larger turn-signal lamps / integral taillights used on the very few 1957 trucks produced. As these vehicles were essentially hand-built, individual variations abound.

Edited by mike6024 (see edit history)

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Cool. The Chrysler flathead 6 at that time for light pickups was a 230 CID engine. Looks like a lot of the body is Fiberglass or am I mistaken??? Dandy Dave!  

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2 minutes ago, Dandy Dave said:

Cool. The Chrysler flathead 6 at that time for light pickups was a 230 CID engine. Looks like a lot of the body is Fiberglass or am I mistaken??? Dandy Dave!  

I believe the bodies are metal.

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Looks like Dandy Dave! is right there is fiberglass in these, at least the front end piece.

 

The often badly damaged or missing front panel (nose) is made of fiberglass.

 

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12 hours ago, CarFreak said:

And Peter, if you really are a sucker for an Orphan, this is a show you've got to visit one time or another. 

 

 

http://wardsauto.com/technology/17th-annual-ypsilanti-orphan-car-show#slide-0-field_images-851061

 

 

 

Nice video, especially having the shot of the early morning Park video of my 1928 Whippet on the trailer at Registration. The two Monarchs behind me are my friend's which at least one comes to this show annually.

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It does capture the general casual mood of this non judged and informative show.

Proceeds from this show go to support what was the last Hudson Dealership known as Ypsilanti Heritage Automotive Museum.

 

Go for it Peter, you and the car will become hits of any show and have some great fun! :)   

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12 hours ago, mike6024 said:

 

The link I posted,  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powel_Crosley,_Jr  was intended to link to a Wikipedia Article on Powel (notice only one 'L') Crosley, the industrialist and developer of the Crosley automobile.  I Googled the name "Crosley", and the Wikipedia Article was one of the many 'hits' that surfaced.  I just copied the address from the browser, and that's how I came up with the above link.  The problem I've encountered with the link is that it dead ends into the Wikipedia page with the header: "Powel Crosley, Jr".  This page states: "Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name." and goes on to suggest alternate search methods.  I don't understand this.  Searching from Google gets me to the full Wikipedia Article, but clicking on the saved/linked browser address of that same article gets me to a dead end.

 

It's just one more of the many things I fail to understand about comfuters.:blink:

 

Cheers,

Grog

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

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I think the question would be, why do you want it? Just being odd or different never seems to be quite enough. Restoration will cost the same as most any similar car. Why that one and it will take up the same amount of space as an alternative. What is the compelling force to own it?

Bernie

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Not trying to be a wet blanket here, but...

Didn't take the time to read all the links above, but I would think Googling Powells would bring up questions re' serious maintenance difficulties...I can't recall specifically whether mechanical, body, or both, but do recall a couple being driven around with prominent "LEMON" sighs attached (Tuscon AZ??)...

If all mechanicals were the well proven Plymouth/CCptn, problems must've been in assembly or bodywork???...vehicles seemed to appear and disappear rather quickly...

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A Powell is probably the very first 'recycled car'!!

 

Craig

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6 hours ago, mike6024 said:

 

Those work, but not the one I copied and pasted:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powel_Crosley,_Jr  It's all so very clear to me now:mellow:.  For the want of a comma, or period (not 'and'), all attempts at  communication were for naught:(.  But for my failure, Powel (note one 'L') Crosley would have been celebrated in this forum as an automotive titan (maybe semi-titan, if there is such a thing), and the value of my Crosley collection would have skyrocketed accordingly:D.  Now that I've got the comma/period, umm, err, comma/dot thing figgered out, I think it's time for me to tackle the 'pound' (#) thing ... or is it 'hash-mark'.  It'll take me awhile to sort this out since Webster's defines "hash" as "A mixture; a jumble; a mess." which makes me a bit reluctant to get hashed up in all of this 'tag' stuff at this time.

 

Back to the thread:

6 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

I think the question would be, why do you want it? Just being odd or different never seems to be quite enough.

 

Bernie,

 

Does there have to be a reason (logical or otherwise) to want a gnarly, old, impractical, difficult, unreliable (relatively), dollar-draining __________________ (fill in the blank, but be nice about it)?:o   I like the odd and/or different stuff, whether it's cars or ... but that's just me.  Does that make me odd?  Maybe, but at 72 yrs. of age, I don't really care:D.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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Going to require some patching of the fiberglass, outboard of the left front headlight. I like the concept. The Chevy suburban type one looks preferable though, it'd be good for going camping or long road trips. Like an International Harvester Travelall.

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There was an article on these some years ago, perhaps in Special Interest Autos. Good luck. Would be a fun one.

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