ScottMill

1925 Hupmobile 3-door

16 posts in this topic

Hello All,

 

     My father left us a (rare?) 1925 Hupmobile, 3 door sedan.  The number from under the steering wheel is:  R176066.  

 

     I really have no skill or interest in restoring her and would like to sell to someone who will love/restore her to her original state - it but I have NO IDEA what she's worth.  I'd be interested in your expert opinions before I try.  She's been kept in a climate controlled garage/shelter for at least the last 30+ years (not sure how long Dad owned her, but if I remember right he said she was kept in a garage).

 

     Any help you could provide would be appreciated!  I've attached some photos, please let me know if the attachment doesn't work.  I don't have any current pictures as I'm in another state, but will see if my brother can get some for me.

 

Scott & Laura

1925 Hupmobile.PDF

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That looks like a clean it up and drive it sort of project.

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Posted (edited)

Keiser31:  The car actually ran fine many years ago (not sure how long ago since my brother drove it), but I know it's been awhile.    

 

JayG:  The car is in Nebraska.

 

Does anyone have any idea what we could sell it (as is) for?  Or know anything about a 3-door, 1925 Hupmobile?  There are a few 1926 3-doors, but I'm having a hard time finding 1925's.  I know it is a 1925 because my Dad bought it purposely because it was his birth year.

Edited by ScottMill (see edit history)

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22 minutes ago, mike6024 said:

Nice

Looks like a nice unrestored car or older restoration. I don't think the '20s sedans are in high demand. People seek more the open-top roadsters and touring cars. If your car is complete and with no major damage, I would estimate about $6500-$8500. If you can check it out in more detail, it will help your sale. Does engine turn freely? Any rust-through or rot? Does it look complete? If you have a car friend who can get it started, it would be a real plus.

 

Phil

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If those 1926 models are listed for sale,  I would use their prices as a guide to price yours.  The difference in value between the 2 years will be minimal if any. 

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That looks like the'25 that was owned and restored by Louis Seekon of Minneapolis Mn. I believe it was sold by Louis' family in the later 70's/ early 80's. Do you have any ownership history prior to your father's ownership? Contact me via PM or email scampoutatComcastdotnet.

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Thanks All,

 

We will pull her out this spring and get better pictures, try to get someone out for appraisal and get her running.  We were thinking somewhere in the 6-8K range but didn't have a clue.  Thanks for the tips, comments.

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There are a number of antique-auto appraisers out there,

Scott and Laura.  They have been discussed on this forum,

and not all experiences with appraisers have been good.

(I haven't used any, but other AACA members have.)

If you concur with our estimate of value, you probably don't

even need an appraiser.

 

And please remember:  Anyone who appraises an item

must not offer to purchase it.  That would be a conflict of

interest.  (I see some antique-car dealers offering "free

valuations," and that's probably their way of making an offer.)

 

I agree that getting the car running and driving properly

might help its sale;  but if you're handling an estate, don't 

feel you need to take on that extra project.  Plenty of true

antique-car fans will be undaunted, and might like to do

the mechanical work themselves.  All the best to you!

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In "as is" condition I believe 4-6,000 $$ is a more realistic expectation on a car with unknown running issues and its current cosmetic condition. The Orphan makes in that era (w/ the exception of Packards) are a tough sell. Getting it running and driving/stopping would help a lot. I am aware of a very nice example of that car (yes, a '25 Hupp) which was purchased by a local person for just under $7,000.

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John S and KKing - thank you both.  Our Dad passed away in 1992 (the date of the pictures).  Both my brother and I were young and thought we'd want to fix her up (hard to let go), but obviously 25 years later we have both decided it's time for the old car to have someone who is serious and will give her the respect she deserves.  We appreciate the advice.

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Here are a few excellent places to advertise a car of that vintage.

I list them in my order of preference for a car such as yours:

 

---The website of the Horseless Carriage Club of America,

www.hcca.org.  The club focuses on pre-1916 cars, but a

1925 car would be perfectly appropriate for their website.

Their for-sale entries are large and prominent on their website,

and not of huge quantity, so your ad would definitely be noticed.

 

---The magazine or newsletter (assuming there is one) of the

Hupmobile Club.  Specific clubs will attract the most serious buyers

of specific cars.

 

---AACA's national magazine, Antique Automobile.  The AACA is the

largest antique-car club and has thousands of dedicated members,

liking cars from all eras.

 

---The website prewarcar.com.  Focuses on pre-World War II cars.

 

---Hemmings Motor News, magazine and website www.hemmings.com.

The foremost place for buying and selling antique cars and parts.

You'll see over 20,000 collector cars for sale on their website, all

sorted by make.  I place Hemmings down on the list for this car

because your car is a bit obscure, and the more specific venues

may be better.  But it is good, too.

 

Be sure to include plenty of pictures in your ad, and price your

car reasonably.  Cars of 1925 and thereabouts don't have a huge

interest in the current market;  but all you need is one buyer!

Some people, especially antique-car dealers, try to price their

car far above its actual worth--even double--hoping someone will

come along.  Don't do it that way:  Be modest and forthcoming,

and patient if you need to be, and you'll find a good home for your dad's car. 

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John S - Thanks!  We will get to it this spring.  You have all been very helpful and really given us a starting point.  My first instinct was to contact Jay Leno, LOL.

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Their is a Hupp Club which I don't have the address but my brother has a 29 and he belongs.  Do a search on this forum for Hupp related post and you will find it.  There is also a Hupp catagory on this forum which you might ask your questions.

 

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