Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
1965rivgs

Need advice on purchasing `32 Cadillac

7 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Hi All,

  New to this forum as my interests have been in newer, lesser antique cars. I am considering purchasing a `32 Cadillac and could use some guidance. My experience is in `50`s and `60`s cars so I am a little lost as to looking for the general or generic pitfalls in purchasing an early `30`s car.

  I`m guessing because the sheetmetal is wrapped around wooden frames a major issue can be rot in the frames in spite of the sheetmetal looking OK?

Does this consideration largely go away with all steel construction later in the `30`s?

  I know a book can be written in response to my very general question but just a few pointers to get me rolling would be great!

  Thanks in advance,

  Tom

Edited by 1965rivgs
spelling (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎1‎/‎23‎/‎2017 at 0:19 AM, 1965rivgs said:

I`m guessing because the sheetmetal is wrapped around wooden frames a major issue can be rot in the frames in spite of the sheetmetal looking OK?

 

 

Unless it was partially rewooded in the past:   The lower door fit won't look right if the wood is starting to go bad.   Water gets into doors near the glass, so the door bottom wood goes bad first.  That makes the door twist a bit, and the rear lower corner will stick out too far.

 

I'd have a "32 Cad" looked at by someone who knows these cars, or at least that vintage of car, if you are new to this.  There are many things that need checking that could be very costly to repair.  Some expensive cars were better cared for over the last century, so that is somewhat promising.

 

 

 

.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 You definitely want someone who is familiar with prewar multicylinder coach built  cars.  With a rarity and difficulty of getting parts ,  in the expense of restoration ,  I would recommend you hire a multicylinder Cadillac expert.  It's  much less expensive to spend money on inspector and not buy the car then if you buy the car with incomplete or bad advice.  32 Cadillac 12s are terrific cars but they can be a handful for your first pre-war car. Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Super stylish car (and really impressive on the road too), though also the first year they dropped the body down over the frame - be careful of wood rot in the sills, lower door post at the sills, doors, around windshield/rear window and roof.    Look at how lower door fits, door sag, top moldings pulling from body, and ,,,,,,   Also, I recall calling a friend regarding a 1931 V-16 engine rebuild and he was $1000 a hole, 1000 for clutch/pilot/throw out, 2,500 for accessories, 1500/2000 for proper radiator and another 10K if I wanted it 100 point show cosmetics (basically 30K).  Also, you will pay a premium for missing parts (also replacement parts availability outside engine are a but sketchy).

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Thanks for the replies gentlemen, much appreciated. It seems the `32 has slipped thru my hands, maybe a good thing, maybe not. But I am still on the lookout and can use the tips supplied, thanks.

 Where would someone suggest finding a "multi cylinder" expert for hire? The Cadillac club?

 I am not familiar with full on "classics" such as the `32. Not very familiar with CCCA guidelines either...it is my understanding only certain models/years are qualified for membership and competition? Is there an online reference  so I can educate myself? Thanks again,

  Tom Mooney

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

You may enjoy a CCCA membership - we have a very well done publication(s)

 

Any prewar car buff should belong to the CCCA.  The publications are worth it all on their own.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0